By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

WRITERS GUILD EAST ANNOUNCES TRIBUTE TO NORA EPHRON AT 2013 AWARDS CEREMONY

PRESS RELEASE

February 13, 2013

AUTHOR MEG WOLITZER LEADS TRIBUTE TO AWARD-WINNING WRITER AND DIRECTOR, THE LATE NORA EPHRON, AT AWARDS EAST COAST CEREMONY

New York City – Writers Guild of America, East today announced a tribute to award-winning, screenwriter, director, playwright, author, and Guild, East member Nora Ephron. The tribute to Ephron, who died in June, will be led by the author Meg Wolitzer, whose novel, “This Is My Life,” was adapted and directed by Ephron in 1992 and presented at the Writers Guild Awards East Coast ceremony on Sunday February 17, in New York City.

“At this year’s Writers Guild Awards East Coast ceremony, we will mark the passing of one of our most distinguished and creative members. Nora Ephron’s life and body of work were those of a quintessential New Yorker, but not only did she embody the sophistication, wit and energy of our city, she was also a loyal union member who walked the picket line and talked the talk on behalf of all her fellow writers,” said Michael Winship, President, Writers Guild of America, East.

During Ephron’s storied career as a journalist, essayist, playwright, screenwriter, novelist, producer and director, she came to embody the words “Written in New York,” with her iconic set-in-New York scripted films When Harry Met Sally and You’ve Got Mail.  Her most recent New York-centric work, the play, Lucky Guy, stars actor Tom Hanks and debuts on Broadway in March 2013.

Ephron was also a longtime Guild member and ardent supporter, and in 2003 received the union’s Ian McClellan Hunter Award honoring her body of work as a writer in motion pictures.

During her nearly four decades in film, Ephron wrote or co-wrote 14 produced screenplays, and had worked on or had in development many more. She directed eight films.  Her sister Delia Ephron was a frequent collaborator, co-writing Bewitched, Hanging Up, Michael, Mixed Nuts, You’ve Got Mail, and the off-Broadway play Love, Loss and What I Wore.

Nora Ephron was nominated three times– in 1984, 1990 and 1993, respectively– for the Academy Award in the category of “Best Writing, Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen,” for the films Silkwood, When Harry Met Sally and Sleepless in Seattle She was also nominated four times for the Writers Guild of America Award for Silkwood, When Harry Met Sally, Sleepless in Seattle and Julie & Julia.

Author, friend and Guild member Meg Wolitzer will speak and present a video with clips displaying Ephron’s characteristic style and charm from her films and television interviews.

The 2013 Writers Guild Awards will be held on Sunday, February 17, 2013, simultaneously at B.B. King Blues Club in New York City and the JW Marriott in Los Angeles. For more information about the 2013 Writers Guild Awards, please visit www.wgaeast.org or www.wga.org.

The 65th Annual Writers Guild Awards East Coast ceremony is supported this year by AT&T along with sponsors Ketel One, Raphael, Blue Moon Brewing Company and Corona Light. New York Magazine is the official media sponsor for the New York awards ceremony.

The Writers Guild of America, East (WGAE) and Writers Guild of America, West (WGAW) are labor unions representing writers in motion pictures, television, cable, digital media, and broadcast news. The Guilds negotiate and administer contracts that protect the creative and economic rights of their members; conduct programs, seminars, and events on issues of interest to writers; and present writers’ views to various bodies of government. For more information on the Writers Guild of America, East, visit www.wgaeast.org. For more information on the Writers Guild of America, West, visit www.wga.org.

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MB Cool. I was really interested in the aerial photography from Enter the Void and how one could understand that conceptually as a POV, while in fact it’s more of an objective view of the city where the story takes place. So it’s an objective and subjective camera at the same time. I know that you’re interested in Kubrick. We’ve talked about that in the past because it’s something that you and I have in common—

GN You’re obsessed with Kubrick, too.

MB Does he still occupy your mind or was he more of an early influence?

GN He was more of an early influence. Kubrick has been my idol my whole life, my own “god.” I was six or seven years old when I saw 2001: A Space Odyssey, and I never felt such cinematic ecstasy. Maybe that’s what brought me to direct movies, to try to compete with that “wizard of Oz” behind the film. So then, years later, I tried to do something in that direction, like many other directors tried to do their own, you know, homage or remake or parody or whatever of 2001. I don’t know if you ever had that movie in mind for your own projects. But in my case, I don’t think about 2001 anymore now. That film was my first “trip” ever. And then I tried my best to reproduce on screen what some drug trips are like. But it’s very hard. For sure, moving images are a better medium than words, but it’s still very far from the real experience. I read that Kubrick said about Lynch’s Eraserhead, that he wished he had made that movie because it was the film he had seen that came closest to the language of nightmares.

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