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By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

WRITERS GUILD EAST ANNOUNCES TRIBUTE TO NORA EPHRON AT 2013 AWARDS CEREMONY

PRESS RELEASE

February 13, 2013

AUTHOR MEG WOLITZER LEADS TRIBUTE TO AWARD-WINNING WRITER AND DIRECTOR, THE LATE NORA EPHRON, AT AWARDS EAST COAST CEREMONY

New York City – Writers Guild of America, East today announced a tribute to award-winning, screenwriter, director, playwright, author, and Guild, East member Nora Ephron. The tribute to Ephron, who died in June, will be led by the author Meg Wolitzer, whose novel, “This Is My Life,” was adapted and directed by Ephron in 1992 and presented at the Writers Guild Awards East Coast ceremony on Sunday February 17, in New York City.

“At this year’s Writers Guild Awards East Coast ceremony, we will mark the passing of one of our most distinguished and creative members. Nora Ephron’s life and body of work were those of a quintessential New Yorker, but not only did she embody the sophistication, wit and energy of our city, she was also a loyal union member who walked the picket line and talked the talk on behalf of all her fellow writers,” said Michael Winship, President, Writers Guild of America, East.

During Ephron’s storied career as a journalist, essayist, playwright, screenwriter, novelist, producer and director, she came to embody the words “Written in New York,” with her iconic set-in-New York scripted films When Harry Met Sally and You’ve Got Mail.  Her most recent New York-centric work, the play, Lucky Guy, stars actor Tom Hanks and debuts on Broadway in March 2013.

Ephron was also a longtime Guild member and ardent supporter, and in 2003 received the union’s Ian McClellan Hunter Award honoring her body of work as a writer in motion pictures.

During her nearly four decades in film, Ephron wrote or co-wrote 14 produced screenplays, and had worked on or had in development many more. She directed eight films.  Her sister Delia Ephron was a frequent collaborator, co-writing Bewitched, Hanging Up, Michael, Mixed Nuts, You’ve Got Mail, and the off-Broadway play Love, Loss and What I Wore.

Nora Ephron was nominated three times– in 1984, 1990 and 1993, respectively– for the Academy Award in the category of “Best Writing, Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen,” for the films Silkwood, When Harry Met Sally and Sleepless in Seattle She was also nominated four times for the Writers Guild of America Award for Silkwood, When Harry Met Sally, Sleepless in Seattle and Julie & Julia.

Author, friend and Guild member Meg Wolitzer will speak and present a video with clips displaying Ephron’s characteristic style and charm from her films and television interviews.

The 2013 Writers Guild Awards will be held on Sunday, February 17, 2013, simultaneously at B.B. King Blues Club in New York City and the JW Marriott in Los Angeles. For more information about the 2013 Writers Guild Awards, please visit www.wgaeast.org or www.wga.org.

The 65th Annual Writers Guild Awards East Coast ceremony is supported this year by AT&T along with sponsors Ketel One, Raphael, Blue Moon Brewing Company and Corona Light. New York Magazine is the official media sponsor for the New York awards ceremony.

The Writers Guild of America, East (WGAE) and Writers Guild of America, West (WGAW) are labor unions representing writers in motion pictures, television, cable, digital media, and broadcast news. The Guilds negotiate and administer contracts that protect the creative and economic rights of their members; conduct programs, seminars, and events on issues of interest to writers; and present writers’ views to various bodies of government. For more information on the Writers Guild of America, East, visit www.wgaeast.org. For more information on the Writers Guild of America, West, visit www.wga.org.

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Tsangari: With my next film, White Knuckles, it comes with a budget — it’s going to be a huge new world for me. As always when I enter into a new thing, don’t you wonder how it’s going to be and how much of yourself you are going to have to sacrifice? The ballet of all of this. I’m already imaging the choreography — not of the camera, but the choreography of actually bringing it to life. It is as fascinating as the shooting itself. I find the producing as exciting as the directing. The one informs the other. There is this producer-director hat that I constantly wear. I’ve been thinking about these early auteurs, like Howard Hawks and John Ford and Preston Sturges—all of these guys basically were hired by the studio, and I doubt they had final cut, and somehow they had films that now we can say they had their signatures.  There are different ways of being creative within the parameters and limitations of production. The only thing you cannot negotiate is stupidity.
Filmmaker: And unfortunately, there is an abundance of that in the world.
Tsangari: This is the only big risk: stupidity. Everything else is completely worked out in the end.
~ Chevalier‘s Rachel Athina Tsangari

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