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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

Video: Harry Hanrahan’s Hit By A Bus (NSFBOAS)

NSFBOAS – Not Safe For Backing Onto A Street

9 Responses to “Video: Harry Hanrahan’s Hit By A Bus (NSFBOAS)”

  1. Triple Option says:

    There are so many of these! I never realized. It’s the modern day equivalent to slipping on a banana peel. I didn’t get a chance to watch the whole thing but kinda surprised that even though I know generally what’s coming on some I was still cracking up.

  2. YancySkancy says:

    Amazing how many of these cheat the sound of the approaching vehicle, a tradition that goes back at least to the 1942 CAT PEOPLE.

    Has there been a supercut of a related trope, the sudden smashing of a vehicle from the side, shot from inside the car? These days, anytime I see a shot through a side window, I brace myself for the sudden impact.

  3. berg says:

    I kept waiting for the Margaret clip …. Star Trek was good too, The City on the Edge of Forever is my favorite episode (although the camera cuts before the connect) next to Mirror Mirror … the first time I remember seeing this full-on effect was in Meet Joe Black

  4. cadavra says:

    Just proves how tiresome this cliche has become, even when it’s intended satirically.

  5. Lex says:

    LOL, pretty funny… Its sister cliche (even more tired and nowhere near as funny) is the “car getting hit at full speed on the passenger side,” which is always always telegraphed by a really terrible matte shot of the actor in the passenger seat that gives you just enough time to tense up at the lens-flared headlights before the ear-shattering crash.

  6. YancySkancy says:

    Lex: That’s what I said a few posts up, but you said it more concisely. It’s not always on the passenger’s side though. I think the first time I saw that one was in ADAPTATION.

  7. Lex says:

    Damn, I didn’t read Yancy’s comment, sorry.

    I always think of THE FORGOTTEN with Julianne Moore as one of the first big ones of that, but it seems to happen in just about everything now.

  8. etguild2 says:

    Pretty good. Hanrahan’s clips are the best…”100 Greatest Insults of All Time” is still the best.

  9. christian says:

    OFFICE SPACE did it before ADAPTATION…

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