MCN Blogs
David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

Random Video: Driving While Stoned In Washington State

5 Responses to “Random Video: Driving While Stoned In Washington State”

  1. actionman says:

    contestant envy…

  2. Jon says:

    So the moral is: don’t get intoxicated on something and drive.

    In other words, don’t be an idiot.

  3. Ripon Kumar says:

    Army Wives S1–awesome film by Actor Daniel Bostic.A real acting by Daniel Bostic. I am real fan of Daniel Bostic.His Movie is really entertaining.Waiting for his coming movies
    https://twitter.com/debostic
    https://www.facebook.com/actordanielbostic

  4. KrazyEyes says:

    My takeaway is that they need to raise the legal limit a bit.

  5. leahnz says:

    ha, everybody knows stoned drivers drive slow and super cautious — as long as you’re not off your face that’s certainly preferable to boozing and driving like an over-confident bat out of hell (the driving instructor guy was pretty funny)

Leave a Reply

The Hot Blog

Quote Unquotesee all »

“I am just grateful I am still around. I would love to be Steven Soderbergh, but I am lucky to be Joe Swanberg. Actors want to work with me, people want to give me money, and my nightmare scenario remains: Getting in bed with a studio, spending years on a movie, and it turns out horrible, but now I’m rich.”

Actually, by Hollywood standards, you’re right, I said. That is unambitious.

“It is, and yet, if you can go to bed happy at night, doing what you want, isn’t that ambition for a lifetime?”
~ Swanberg On Swanberg By Borelli

“In retrospect, nothing of that kind surprised me about Philip, because his intuition was luminous from the instant you met him. So was his intelligence. A lot of actors act intelligent, but Philip was the real thing: a shining, artistic polymath with an intelligence that came at you like a pair of headlights and enveloped you from the moment he grabbed your hand, put a huge arm round your neck and shoved a cheek against yours; or if the mood took him, hugged you to him like a big, pudgy schoolboy, then stood and beamed at you while he took stock of the effect.”
John le Carré on Philip Seymour Hoffman