MCN Blogs

By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Picturing David Gordon Green’s JOE

From David Gordon Green’s “gritty” Southern drama Joe, with Nicolas Cage and Tye Sheridan (Mud, Tree of Life), selling at the Berlinale EFM. “Joe is written by Gary Hawkins based on the Larry Brown novel, and produced by Green, his longtime producer Lisa Muskat, and Worldview CEO Christopher Woodrow, alongside Derrick Tseng.

“In the dirty unruly world of smalltown Texas, ex-convict Joe Ransom (Cage) has tried to put his dark past behind him and to live a simple life. He works for a lumber company by day, drinks by night. But when 15-year-old Gary (Sheridan)—a kid trying to support his family—comes to town, desperate for work, Joe has found a way to atone for his sins—to finally be someone’s hero. As Joe tries to protect Gary, the pair will take the twisting road to redemption in the hope for a better life in this tough, hard-hitting but incredibly moving story.”

Leave a Reply

Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

“I am just grateful I am still around. I would love to be Steven Soderbergh, but I am lucky to be Joe Swanberg. Actors want to work with me, people want to give me money, and my nightmare scenario remains: Getting in bed with a studio, spending years on a movie, and it turns out horrible, but now I’m rich.”

Actually, by Hollywood standards, you’re right, I said. That is unambitious.

“It is, and yet, if you can go to bed happy at night, doing what you want, isn’t that ambition for a lifetime?”
~ Swanberg On Swanberg By Borelli

“In retrospect, nothing of that kind surprised me about Philip, because his intuition was luminous from the instant you met him. So was his intelligence. A lot of actors act intelligent, but Philip was the real thing: a shining, artistic polymath with an intelligence that came at you like a pair of headlights and enveloped you from the moment he grabbed your hand, put a huge arm round your neck and shoved a cheek against yours; or if the mood took him, hugged you to him like a big, pudgy schoolboy, then stood and beamed at you while he took stock of the effect.”
John le Carré on Philip Seymour Hoffman