By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

OSCILLOSCOPE IS HOT FOR A TEACHER

 

Sundance Favorite Scheduled For Release This Year

 

(New York, NY) February 13, 2013—Oscilloscope Laboratories announced today that it has acquired North American rights to Hannah Fidell’s feature directorial debut A TEACHER.  The film premiered last month to critical and audience acclaim at the Sundance Film Festival and is headed to Austin next month where it will play South By Southwest.  O-Scope plans a theatrical, video-on-demand and digital release later this year.

Part psychological thriller and part provocative character study, A TEACHER explores the unraveling of a young high school teacher, Diana (Lindsay Burdge), after she begins an affair with one of her teenage students, Eric (Will Brittain).  What starts as a seemingly innocent fling becomes increasingly complex—and dangerous—as the beautiful and confident Diana gets fully consumed by her emotions, crossing boundaries and acting out in progressively startling ways. Lindsay Burdge delivers a deeply compelling and seamlessly naturalistic performance that brings us into the mind of an adult driven to taboo against her better judgment.

O-Scope’s David Laub and Dan Berger said, “A TEACHER is a remarkably assured debut, and demonstrates two immense new talents, one in front of and one behind the camera. We couldn’t be more excited to welcome the film into O-Scope’s ranks and present it to the world.”

Hannah Fidell said, “We’re so thrilled to be joining the Oscilloscope family.  Their films represent everything we love about cinema and we are honored A TEACHER has found such an ideal home.”

A TEACHER was produced by Kim Sherman and Hannah Fidell.

The deal was negotiated by David Laub and Dan Berger for Oscilloscope with ICM Partners on behalf of the filmmakers.  ICM Partners also represents Hannah Fidell and Lindsay Burdge.

 

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About Oscilloscope Laboratories:

 

Oscilloscope Laboratories is a film production and theatrical distribution entity launched in 2008 by Adam Yauch of Beastie Boys. Yauch modeled the company after the indie record labels he grew up around, choosing films and then releasing them with the same artistic integrity with which they were made.  The company, which is an extension of Yauch’s recording studio of the same name, has an in-house DVD distribution and production arm, and its paper packaging is reminiscent of the heyday of LP record jackets. All of the company’s plastic-free DVD packaging is printed on FSC Certified 80% post-consumer waste paper and produced in a carbon-neutral hydroelectric plant.  Previous and current releases include Lynne Ramsay’s Golden Globe® Nominated WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT KEVIN starring Tilda Swinton, John C. Reilly, and Ezra Miller; Marshall Curry’s Oscar-nominated documentary IF A TREE FALLS: A STORY OF THE EARTH LIBERATION FRONT; Oren Moverman’s Oscar-nominated THE MESSENGER starring Ben Foster, Woody Harrelson and Samantha Morton; Kelly Reichardt’s MEEK’S CUTOFF starring Michelle Williams; Evan Glodell’s Sundance hit BELLFLOWER; Kelly Reichardt’s WENDY & LUCY starring Michelle Williams; Anders Østergaard’s Oscar-nominated documentary BURMA VJ; Kurt Keunne’s acclaimed documentary DEAR ZACHARY; Bradley Rust Gray’s THE EXPLODING GIRL starring Zoe Kazan; Scott Hamilton Kennedy’s Oscar-nominated documentary THE GARDEN; Dylan Southern and Will Lovelace’s LCD Soundsystem documentary SHUT UP AND PLAY THE HITS; Ron Fricke and Mark Magidson’s SAMSARA; Andrea Arnold’s WUTHERING HEIGHTS, Matt Ross’s 28 HOTEL ROOMS, and the acclaimed documentaries TCHOUPITOULAS by Bill and Turner Ross and ONLY THE YOUNG by Jason Tippet and Elizabeth Mims.  Upcoming releases include Keith Miller’s Slamdance Grand Prize Winner WELCOME TO PINE HILL, Matteo Garrone’s Cannes Grand Prix-winner REALITY, Todd Berger’s IT’S A DISASTER, starring David Cross, Julia Stiles, and America Ferrara; Rowan Athale’s WASTELAND, Andrew Dosunmu’s MOTHER OF GEORGE, and Omar Mullick and Bassam Tariq’s THESE BIRDS WALK.

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