85th Academy Awards: Winners

2010 | 2011 | 2012

Best Picture: Argo
Actor: Daniel Day-Lewis, Lincoln
Actress: Jennifer Lawrence, Silver Linings Playbook
Supporting Actor: Christoph Waltz, Django Unchained
Supporting Actress: Anne Hathaway, Les Miserables
Directing: Ang Lee, Life of Pi
Foreign Language Film: Amour
Adapted Screenplay: Chris Terrio, Argo
Original Screenplay: Quentin Tarantino, Django Unchained
Animated Feature Film: Brave
Production Design: Lincoln
Cinematography: Life of Pi
Sound Mixing: Les Miserables
Sound Editing (tie): Skyfall, Zero Dark Thirty
Original Score: Life of Pi, Mychael Danna
Original Song: Skyfall from Skyfall, Adele Adkins and Paul Epworth
Costume: Anna Karenina
Documentary Feature: Searching for Sugar Man
Documentary (short subject): Inocente
Film Editing: Argo
Makeup and Hairstyling: Les Miserables
Animated Short Film: Paperman
Live Action Short Film: Curfew
Visual Effects: Life of Pi

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“One of my favorite things in watching any performance on film is when there isn’t a lot of cutting going on and when you get a chance to become really absorbed in the artist in hand. The same way we do, hopefully, at a concert, when we get a chance to really trip in to something that’s happening on stage. Whether the singer’s singing, or one of the other musicians is playing, we sort of stay there instead of cutting round with our eyes a lot.”
~ Jonathan Demme

“We’ve talked about this before in the past, my obsession with the Shakespearean histories having the ideal combination of the sweet and the sour. In ‘Henry IV, Part II’ which we’ve discussed before, in the end of that story it’s very complex and haunting because Prince Hal becomes Henry the King, and he has transcended his hoodlum days and at the ceremony is Falstaff, his good friend with whom he has really fucked around and been a loser with, and Falstaff comes up to him and says, ‘Now that you’re king we can really party,’ and the king famously says, ‘I know thee not, old man.’ It becomes Henry IV’s anointment and Falstaff’s catastrophe. That’s life. I have experienced very little unfettered triumph. There are moments, such as when my children are born, but even that comes with new fears and anxieties. In a sense the better you can communicate that life is both at once, the more powerful over time something becomes. One strives for something where the threads are there because it lasts in way that is very palpable. The idea of a tragedy is powerful in literature and theater, but in cinema it doesn’t work, certainly not commercially, and less so critically. Why is that? I think it has to do with how movies are so close to us.”
~ James Gray