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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

My Favorite Films/Statues From The Olly Moss Oscar Poster

You can find and explore and purchase the full poster here

4 Responses to “My Favorite Films/Statues From The Olly Moss Oscar Poster”

  1. KrazyEyes says:

    Not bad. Not quite as creative as some of Moss’s other works (Studio Ghibli, Star Wars) but some work quite nicely. I think your picks are pretty spot-on too.

    Overall though, I think they work much better as the single poster than as individual pieces.

  2. movielocke says:

    I’d happily view the full poster, but that appears to not be possible. I guess I’ll have to hope I’m lucky enough to see it in person plastered somewhere around LA. Too bad the full poster isn’t available for viewing, here or at any of the links. No fucking way in hell I’m going to click through 85 times for every individual fucking movie (and I’m guessing a new ad with a 10 second hold every time I try to advance) at the official oscar.go website. Blech.

  3. berg says:

    I clicked through all the pics and it didn’t take that long …. waaahh … also just watched part 2 of the Boal DP 30 on youtube, and it was great

  4. hcat says:

    Movielocke, go to the Empire site they allow you to highlight different quadrants of the poster.

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