MCN Columnists
Mike Wilmington

By Mike Wilmington Wilmington@moviecitynews.com

Chicago Film Critics Association Awards 2013

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cFor 20 years, since 1993, I’ve taken part in the voting, and sometimes the awards shows, for The Chicago Film Critics Association — and I’ll be there again for the 2013 Awards.

The show, in the 1990s and  the years before I emigrated to Chicago from Los Angeles, used to be elaborate and star-studded, Then it went into a kind of limbo for a while; Now, in the last two years,  there’s been a campaign by the CFCA to make their awards celebration it a gala affair once more. If you’re in Chicago or thereabouts, you’ll have a chance to see it. (A graphic with information  is below.) Our list of 2012 winners — which interestingly doesn’t mention  Oscar favorite Argo — is below too.

 

CHICAGO FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION AWARDS FRO 1012

BEST PICTURE

 Zero Dark Thirty

BEST ACTOR

 Daniel Day-Lewis ( Lincoln) 

 

BEST ACTRESS

 Jessica Chastain (Zero Dark Thirty) 

 

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

Philip Seymour Hoffman (The Master) 

 

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

 Amy Adams  (The Master) 

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE PICTURE

Amour  

BEST DIRECTOR

Kathryn Bigelow (Zero Dark Thirty)

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

 Lincoln (Tony Kushner)

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY

Zero Dark Thirty (Mark Boam)

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

The Master  (Mihai Malaimare, Jr. )

BEST EDITING

Zero Dark Thirty (William Goldenberg & Dylan Tichenor)

BEST ART DIRECTION/PRODUCTION DESIGN

Moorise Kingdom (Gerald Sullivan and Adam Stockhausen)

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE

The Master (Jonny Greenwood)

BEST NONFICTION FILM

The Invisible War

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE

ParaNorman

 MOST PROMISING NEWCOMER

Quvenzhane Wallis (Beasts of the Southern Wild

MOST PROMISING FILMMAKER

Benh Zeitlin (Beasts of the Southern Wild)

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Here’s the ad and info on this year’s CFCA Awards Show. I hope you can make it.

 

THIS IS YOUR CHANCE to join “Glee” star Jane Lynch and The Chicago Film Critics Association at the CFCA’s 2013 Awards show! Don’t miss your chance to be part of Chicago’s own red carpet with the stars this Saturday!
If you can’t see the image below, view this premiere event directly online.HollywoodChicago.com Hookup for 2013 CFCA Awards

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Wilmington

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“By the time the draft was completed, and passed on to my frequent collaborator, director Kathryn Bigelow, I’d written something quite unlike the singular focus and sole protagonists of The Hurt Locker and Zero Dark Thirty. The effort to make Detroit a mirror of the chaotic times led to an ensemble piece, quickly shifting between characters in a nesting doll of movies within movies, a riot film that gives way to racial horror-crime that switches to a courtroom drama, with several detours along the way into a band’s journey, the miseducation of rookie cops and the adventures of a pair of young women experimenting with sexual freedom. It was, in short, a lot of ground to cover in a single picture. But Kathryn was encouraging, and over the proceeding draft we collaborated closely to hone the themes and scope, while attempting to keep alive the spirit of a tough and untamed narrative.”
~ Mark Boal on researching and writing Detroit

What are we doing wrong?
“Well, first of all, by “we” I assume you mean the public, the public approach or the public discourse, which means the discourse that takes place in the media. And for the purposes of this discussion, let us imagine that the media is white and thus approaches the topic of race as if they (the white people) were the answer and them (the black people) were the question. And so, in the interest of fairness, they take their turn (having first, of course, given it to themselves) and then invite comment by some different white people and some similar black people. They give what purports to be simply their point of view and then everyone else gives their beside-the-point of view.

“The customary way for white people to think about the topic of race—and it is only a topic to white people—is to ask, How would it be if I were black? But you can’t separate the “I” from being white. The “I” is so informed by the experience of being white that it is its very creation—it is this “I” in this context that is, in fact, the white man’s burden. People who think of themselves as well intentioned—which is, let’s face it, how people think of themselves—believe that the best, most compassionate, most American way to understand another person is to walk a mile in their shoes. And I think that’s conventionally the way this thing is approached. And that’s why the conversation never gets anywhere and that’s why the answers always come back wrong and the situation stays static—and worse than static.”
~ Fran Lebowitz, 1997