MCN Blogs
David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

Evolution Of A Blog: The Next Step

Maybe I am not supposed to write this entry.

I have rewritten it twice as it sat on my desktop, day after day, only to have the last version disappear when I pushed “publish.”

Here’s the punchline… time for change.

I don’t know what the change will be. There are many things I love about the work I do. And I get reminded of this by people who I cherish… people who have been around long enough to have perspective. People who give a shit, in spite of all the ugliness into which we have seen the entertainment journalism business devolve.

I want to write more. I want to complain less. I love doing DP/30, but almost a thousand  interviews in, I want it to be better. I am not a shark, but if I don’t feel like I am moving forward, I feel like I might as well be dead (figuratively, for those prone to literalism). And right now, I must admit, I am not 100% sure where to go in The New Normal… which will be the New Normal for a while, whether it is great or shit.

It’s a new year tomorrow. Some room to breath. Some time to seriously consider what the boundaries of that New Normal are and what contribution I can make that would be worth making.

It’s that simple and that complex.

I will discuss, consider, and experiment in the months to come.

There is plenty I despise about what’s happened to journalism in recent years. But push comes to shove, there is still a lot that I absolutely adore… that I do not want to live without… that I want to see through rose-colored glasses again.

Wish me luck…

12 Responses to “Evolution Of A Blog: The Next Step”

  1. movielocke says:

    Don’t try and find “the new normal;” just do your thing and your thing will be normal–your normal will become part of the aggregate new normal, but if you’re chasing the aggregate you’ll never get included and somehow always wind up left behind or left out.

    The cool kids never chase the cool, they just assume what they’re doing is cool by virtue of their doing it. Do that.

  2. Brady says:

    Nicely said, movielocke.

    Greatness is a product of conviction. It’s tough watching such talented people adapt to a world that diminishes their potential.

  3. David Poland says:

    That’s kinda my point, movielocke.

    Not interested in being the new normal. Never have been. Never will be. But I can’t pretend it’s not there. It’s there. And it has a real effect. It must be accounted for.

  4. sanj says:

    DP – you need to be more clear about what type of journalism your talking about … it is aimed at the movie industry or the general movie audience cause you sorta do both … all the industry stuff belongs in variety or hollywood reporter but they won’t have you .. lots of words written about netflix and digital downloads but no real interviews with any of those people .

    will you stop doing dp/30’s ? cause there seems to be a movie festival every month with 100’s of actors out there ….

    i figured if you stoped doing mcn – you’d just end up being in charge of a movie festival doing behind the scenes work . you’d still talk to a lot of people in the movie business.

    DP – can you make another channel on youtube with interviews that aren’t about movies 100% – just random
    videos with people who have something to say about entertainment .just use iphone to video .

    – there’s one person who i’ve seen change on tv doing several different things – Karina Huber – she did music / science and business on tv.

    check her videos

    http://karinahuber.com/

  5. Glamourboy says:

    So in other words…you’re still thinking about it.

    I’ll alert the media.

  6. LYT says:

    David, your niche right now, like it or not, is looking at other people’s journalism, telling them what they’re doing wrong and how to do it better.

    That is a niche not many are filling (other than maybe Criticwire). It might be something you should corner the market on. I say that as one who’s fallen victim occasionally.

  7. Sam says:

    Agree with LYT. I read just about everything here, but it’s the journalistic take on journalism that stands out as the unique offering.

  8. anghus says:

    you are brutally and laboriously over thinking this.

    It’s like that scene in Tommy Boy where they’re at the diner and Farley explains how he destroys every opportunity for a sale by tearing apart a dinner roll.

    Sam said it best. You are the guy who analyzes the guy. You are Nero who stands back and watches it all burn and comments on the rapidly deteriorating standards. Maybe you’re uncomfortable in that role, but i agree with Sam: it’s kind of your thing.

  9. Captain Celluloid says:

    Good luck.

    I’m sure it will be interesting.

  10. celluloidkid says:

    David, I’m mostly a lurker, but just wanted to say that I’ve always appreciated your thorough and thoughtful film reviews and I’m hoping that whatever you decide to do, you might continue giving us the occasional one.

  11. Krillian says:

    Good luck finding your new thing.

  12. arisp says:

    Long-time reader (and occasional misanthropic poster) – good luck DP. I’ll still be around.

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