The Hobbit: Battle of the Five Armies
MCN Blogs
David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

Ed Koch, No Hero Of The AIDS Wars, Expressed His Support Late… As A Film Critic

How To Survive A Plague director David France explains…

6 Responses to “Ed Koch, No Hero Of The AIDS Wars, Expressed His Support Late… As A Film Critic”

  1. The Pope says:

    Given the vicious scale of loss suffered throughout the 80s and 90s, you really can only feel humbled by France’s sense of clemency towards those who shunned so many AIDS victims.

    Haven’t seen the documentary yet, but looking out for it.

  2. Think says:

    It’s available on Netflix (a wonderful way to watch films and television shows that DP never talks about for some reason).

  3. movieman says:

    I really thought “Plague” was among the most overrated of 2012 docs.
    It contained nothing new that I hadn’t already seen in a half dozen (or more) other AIDS/gay lib docs made in the past few years (“We Were Here,” “Vito,” et al).
    I’m guessing the crix who did cartwheels didn’t see any of those other films, or “Plague” wouldn’t have seemed so revelatory or groundbreaking.

  4. David Poland says:

    movieman… I felt Plague put it all together in a way that hadn’t happened before. Not groundbreaking. And not really great filmmaking, as such. But it had more perspective and seemed more definitive than anything I had seen before.

  5. movieman says:

    Maybe if you’d been following the history of AIDS activism as I have for 30+ years, “Plague” would have seemed like equally old news to you, DP.

    …but if you hadn’t, and had never made the acquaintance of Larry Kramer (who, truth be told, doesn’t get nearly as much credit as he deserves in the film).
    …or hadn’t seen any of the multitude of preceding AIDS/gay liberation docs…
    Personally, I’m still waiting for a gay Marcel Ophuls to make the definitive, defining film on the subject.
    As nobly intended as it may be, “How to Survive a Plague” just didn’t do it for me.
    Too much of it was, “been there, seen/heard that.”

  6. hendhogan says:

    I got to see this a couple of nights back. As someone who lived through the time, but hasn’t gone out of my way to learn the history of AIDS activism, I thought it was great. And maybe there have been better docs in the past about the subject. This one moved me. Not just about AIDS, but the need to do more. Activism has been reduced (with apologies to the Occupy movement, which was unfocused at best) to posting things on social media. Other people’s words.

    I have my own causes. I actively go out in the world and fight for those causes. This movie inspired me to do more. And demonstrated the importance of doing more. Because if we rely on the government to solve these problems, we could be waiting a very long time.

Leave a Reply

The Hot Blog

The Hobbit: Battle of the Five Armies

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Any time a movie causes a country to threaten nuclear retaliation, the higher-ups wanna get in a room with you… In terms of getting the word out about the movie, it’s not bad. If they actually make good on it, it would be bad for the world—but luckily that doesn’t seem like their style… We’ll make a movie that maybe for two seconds will make some 18-year-old think about North Korea in a way he never would have otherwise. Or who knows? We were told one of the reasons they’re so against the movie is that they’re afraid it’ll actually get into North Korea. They do have bootlegs and stuff. Maybe the tapes will make their way to North Korea and cause a fucking revolution. At best, it will cause a country to be free, and at worst, it will cause a nuclear war. Big margin with this movie.”
~ Seth Rogen In Rolling Stone 1224

“Yes, good movies sprout up, inevitably, in the cracks and seams between the tectonic plates on which all of these franchises stay balanced, and we are reassured of their hardiness. But we don’t see what we don’t see; we don’t see the effort, or the cost of the effort, or the movies of which we’re deprived because of the cost of the effort. Paul Thomas Anderson’s Inherent Vice may have come from a studio, but it still required a substantial chunk of outside financing, and at $35 million, it’s not even that expensive. No studio could find the $8.5 million it cost Dan Gilroy to make Nightcrawler. Birdman cost a mere $18 million and still had to scrape that together at the last minute. Imagine American movie culture for the last few years without Her or Foxcatcher or American Hustle or The Master or Zero Dark Thirty and it suddenly looks markedly more frail—and those movies exist only because of the fairy godmothership of independent producer Megan Ellison. The grace of billionaires is not a great business model on which to hang the hopes of an art form.”
~ Mark Harris On The State Of The Movies