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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

DP/30s with Oscar Nominees

Someone requested a list today… so I figured some of you might like to have it as well. (after the jump)

Yes, watching all of these would take you at least 5x as long as watching the ™ show itself tonight.

Also, let’s see if anyone can find the DP/30 scheduled to be in the actual show tonight.

Argo
Ben Affleck Producer
Chris Terrio Screenplay
Alexander Desplat Composer

Lincoln
Sally Field Supporting Actress
Tony Kushner Adapted Screenplay
Janusz Kaminski Cinematography
Joanna Johnston Costumes
Rick Carter Production Design

Silver Linings Playbook
David O Russell Director/Screenplay
Jennifer Lawrence Actress
Bradley Cooper Actor
Jacki Weaver Supporting Actress
Jay Cassidy Editor

Zero Dark Thirty
Mark Boal producer/screenwriter
Mark Boal (Pt 2)
Jessica Chastain actor
William Goldenberg editor
Dylan Tichenor editor
Paul N.J. Ottoson sound designer

Beasts of the Southern Wild
Behn Zeitlin Director/Writer
Quvenzhané Wallis Actress
Lucy Alibar Writer
Ben Richardson Cinematographer

Amour
Michael Haneke (Cannes) writer/director

Life of Pi
Mychael Danna Composer

Moonrise Kingdom
Wes Anderson Producer/Screenplay

The Impossible
Naomi Watts Actress

The Sessions
Helen Hunt Supporting Actress

The Master
Amy Adams Supporting Actress

DOCUMENTARIES
The Gatekeepers Dror Moreh 
How to Survive A Plague David France 
The Invisible War Kirby Dick
Searching for Sugar Man John Battsek

FOREIGN LANGUAGE
A Royal Affair Nikolaj Arcel
War Witch Kim Nguyen
Amour Michael Haneke (LA)

ANIMATED FEATURE
Brave Mark Andrews
ParaNorman Sam Fell/Chris Butler 

Anna Karenina
Sarah Greenwood production design

Hitchcock
Howard Berger make-up

The Avengers
Jeff White fx supervisor

Skyfall
Greg Russell sound re-recording mixer

Django Unchained
Wylie Stateman Sound Mixing

The Hobbit
Joe Letteri Visual Effects

Flight
John Gatins Original Screenplay

Paperman
Animated Short John Behrs

One Response to “DP/30s with Oscar Nominees”

  1. The Pope says:

    Thank you David. Very grateful. Just one of the many reason I like visiting at your house.

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