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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30s with Oscar Nominees

Someone requested a list today… so I figured some of you might like to have it as well. (after the jump)

Yes, watching all of these would take you at least 5x as long as watching the ™ show itself tonight.

Also, let’s see if anyone can find the DP/30 scheduled to be in the actual show tonight.

Argo
Ben Affleck Producer
Chris Terrio Screenplay
Alexander Desplat Composer

Lincoln
Sally Field Supporting Actress
Tony Kushner Adapted Screenplay
Janusz Kaminski Cinematography
Joanna Johnston Costumes
Rick Carter Production Design

Silver Linings Playbook
David O Russell Director/Screenplay
Jennifer Lawrence Actress
Bradley Cooper Actor
Jacki Weaver Supporting Actress
Jay Cassidy Editor

Zero Dark Thirty
Mark Boal producer/screenwriter
Mark Boal (Pt 2)
Jessica Chastain actor
William Goldenberg editor
Dylan Tichenor editor
Paul N.J. Ottoson sound designer

Beasts of the Southern Wild
Behn Zeitlin Director/Writer
Quvenzhané Wallis Actress
Lucy Alibar Writer
Ben Richardson Cinematographer

Amour
Michael Haneke (Cannes) writer/director

Life of Pi
Mychael Danna Composer

Moonrise Kingdom
Wes Anderson Producer/Screenplay

The Impossible
Naomi Watts Actress

The Sessions
Helen Hunt Supporting Actress

The Master
Amy Adams Supporting Actress

DOCUMENTARIES
The Gatekeepers Dror Moreh 
How to Survive A Plague David France 
The Invisible War Kirby Dick
Searching for Sugar Man John Battsek

FOREIGN LANGUAGE
A Royal Affair Nikolaj Arcel
War Witch Kim Nguyen
Amour Michael Haneke (LA)

ANIMATED FEATURE
Brave Mark Andrews
ParaNorman Sam Fell/Chris Butler 

Anna Karenina
Sarah Greenwood production design

Hitchcock
Howard Berger make-up

The Avengers
Jeff White fx supervisor

Skyfall
Greg Russell sound re-recording mixer

Django Unchained
Wylie Stateman Sound Mixing

The Hobbit
Joe Letteri Visual Effects

Flight
John Gatins Original Screenplay

Paperman
Animated Short John Behrs

One Response to “DP/30s with Oscar Nominees”

  1. The Pope says:

    Thank you David. Very grateful. Just one of the many reason I like visiting at your house.

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“I’ve been pleasantly surprised by how many recappers, while clearly over their heads, are baseline sympathetic to finding themselves routinely unmoored, even if that means repeating over and over that this is closer to “avant-garde art” than  normal TV to meet the word count. My feed was busy connecting the dots to Peter Tscherkassky (gas station), Tony Conrad (the giant staring at feedback of what we’ve just seen), Pat O’Neill (bombs away) et al., and this is all apposite — visual and conceptual thinking along possibly inadvertent parallel lines. If recappers can’t find those exact reference points to latch onto, that speaks less to willful ignorance than to how unfortunately severed experimental film is from nearly all mainstream discussions of film because it’s generally hard to see outside of privileged contexts (fests, academia, the secret knowledge of a self-preserving circle working with a very finite set of resources and publicity access to the larger world); resources/capital/access/etc. So I won’t assign demerits for willful incuriosity, even if some recappers are reduced, in some unpleasantly condescending/bluffing cases, to dismissing this as a “student film” — because presumably experimentation is something the seasoned artist gets out of their system in maturity, following the George Lucas Model of graduating from Bruce Conner visuals to Lawrence Kasdan’s screenwriting.”
~ Vadim Rizov Goes For It, A Bit

“On the first ‘Twin Peaks,’ doing TV was like going from a mansion to a hut. But the arthouses are gone now, so cable television is a godsend — they’re the new art houses. You’ve got tons of freedom to do the work you want to do on TV, but there is a restriction in terms of picture and sound. The range of television is restricted. It’s hard for the power and the glory to come through. In other words, you can have things in a theater much louder and also much quieter. With TV, the quieter things have to be louder and the louder things have to be quieter, so you have less dynamics. The picture quality — it’s fine if you have a giant television with a good speaker system, but a lot of people will watch this on their laptops or whatever, so the picture and the sound are going to suffer big time. Optimally, people should be watching TV in a dark room with no disturbances and with as big and good a picture as possible and with as great sound as possible.”
~ David Lynch