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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

Best SNL Sketch This Week

11 Responses to “Best SNL Sketch This Week”

  1. Joe Leydon says:

    Pretty damn funny, I must admit.

  2. Geoff says:

    Funnier than Djesus Uncrossed? Even though I’ll admit that one could have been more clever….

  3. Matthew says:

    Hah, she has a funny voice and apparently foreign people are backwards! This is comedy that is both innovative and unique.

  4. christian says:

    Djesus Uncrossed= Bill Hicks rip=off

  5. David Poland says:

    That was such a “Richard Pryor curses to much” response, Matthew.

  6. Matthew says:

    Well, arguing about humor is always a lose/lose situation; I would venture that it’s one of the most personal tastes when it comes to entertainment.

    I will say that whoever this actress is has a career ahead of her in voice acting should she want one – those trills aren’t easy to pull off so rapidly.

  7. Krillian says:

    I liked that one. Djesus Uncrossed and What Have You Become? were pretty good too.

  8. Water bucket says:

    This was my favorite sketch too! I think it was her energy that really made the whole thing funny. Like Will Ferrell used to elevate bad materials by just being so darn committed to the sketches.

  9. Lex says:

    women r not funny ever

    no straight man likes funny women.

  10. Joe Leydon says:

    Lex: Well, in the immortal words of Cary Grant in Bringing Up Baby, I guess I just went gay all of a sudden.

  11. cadavra says:

    C’mon, Joe. Lex has no idea who Cary Grant was or what BRINGING UP BABY is.

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