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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

Anyone Want A Free Copy Of The Master in Blu?

Enter to win, here.

8 Responses to “Anyone Want A Free Copy Of The Master in Blu?”

  1. John says:

    sure…

  2. Stephen says:

    Ya..

  3. Banksy says:

    Yes, please.

  4. Ray Pride says:

    Click through the link to enter.

  5. Lex says:

    Who the hell has a Blu-ray machine?

    You guys must be millionaires or something, I still use VHS and a 1999 DVD player with a 1998 SD TV.

  6. Denise Perry says:

    You can deliver it in April. :-)

  7. Rashad says:

    Lex, blu ray players are cheap now, or if you enjoy video games too, get a PS3. Plus if you love sports, and movies, HD is a must.

  8. berg says:

    everyone should have a big screen HD television with state of the art 3D – 1080 please … if you don’t, get one …. yeah I have an 8mm projector, a 16mm projector (mid-50s model that’s in mint condition for some reason); 2 VHS players (one of which is SVHS), a Sony camcorder and of course blu-ray, don’t get me started on the audio line-up (LPs natch) …. regarding the Master blu … it has as an extra, the John Huston (banned) documentary Let There Be Light about WWII soldiers with *syndrome … there’s also an 8 minute behind the scenes short that has among other clips a shot of the principal and supporting actors, all in an elevator, and someone farts and they slowly one by one lose it (in a good way)

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“There are critics who see their job as to be on the side of the artist, or in a state of imaginative sympathy or alliance with the artist. I think it’s important for a critic to be populist in the sense that we’re on the side of the public. I think one of the reasons is, frankly, capitalism. Whether you’re talking about restaurants or you’re talking about movies, you’re talking about large-scale commercial enterprises that are trying to sell themselves and market themselves and publicize themselves. A critic is, in a way, offering consumer advice. I think it’s very, very important in a time where everything is commercialized, commodified, and branded, where advertising is constantly bleeding into other forms of discourse, for there to be an independent voice kind of speaking to—and to some extent on behalf of—the public.”
~ A. O. Scott On One Role Of The Critic

“Every night, we’d sit and talk for a long, long time and talk about the process and I knew he was very, very intrigued about what could be happening. Then of course, one of the fascinating things he told me about was how he had readers who were reading for him that never knew it was Stanley Kubrick. So if he heard of a novel, he would send it out to people. I think he did it through newspaper ads at the time. And he would send it out to people and ask for a kind of synopsis or a critique of the novel. And he would read those. And it was done anonymously. But he said there were housewives and there were barristers and all sorts of people doing that. And I thought, yeah, that’s a really good way to open up the possibilities. Because otherwise, you’re randomly looking, walking through a bookstore or an airport. I said, “How many people are doing this?” It was about 30 people.”
~ George Miller’s Conversations With Kubrick