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By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Annapurna Pictures Raises A Beautiful, Declarative, Grandiloquent Middle Finger

Annapurna Pictures cuts together a brief, taut sizzle reel from its first productions, LawlessThe MasterThe GrandmasterKilling Them Softly, Zero Dark ThirtySpring Breakers, and does the litany of lines from them not sound like a bold declaration of intent? In part: “‘I’m bad news, I’m not your friend…’ ‘I knew y’all was special, it’s written on your faces…’ ‘Let’s cause some trouble now…’ ‘Don’ you ever touch me agin…’ ‘I just want to make something clear, there is nobody else, there’s just us…’  ’Everybody’s miserable here, they just see the same things…’ ‘If we are not helping him, then it is we who have failed him…’ ‘Don’ make me laugh, I’m livin’ in America and in America you’re on your own.’” And to add one more: “Ye shall know them by their fruits.”


One Response to “Annapurna Pictures Raises A Beautiful, Declarative, Grandiloquent Middle Finger”

  1. Keil S. says:

    Okay, I’d forgotten they did Killing Them Softly as well. They really did kick some ass last year. Either that or Megan has burrowed her way into my brain and taken thorough notes of my likes and dislikes.

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A statement from David Chase’s representative, Leslee Dart:

A journalist for Vox misconstrued what David Chase said in their interview. To simply quote David as saying,“ Tony Soprano is not dead,” is inaccurate. There is a much larger context for that statement and as such, it is not true. As David Chase has said numerous times on the record, “Whether Tony Soprano is alive or dead is not the point.” To continue to search for this answer is fruitless. The final scene of THE SOPRANOS raises a spiritual question that has no right or wrong answer.
~ David Chase Refutes Vox Writer

“By the time the sounds of the Von Trapp children warbling ‘Silent Night’ drift through The Giver, you may find yourself wondering what fresh movie hell this is. In truth, the enervating hash of dystopian dread, vague religiosity and commercial advertising-style uplift is nothing if not stale. Adapted from Lois Lowry’s book for young readers, the story involves an isolated society that, with its cubistic dwellings, mindless smiles, monochromatic environs and nebulous communitarianism, seem modeled on a Scandinavian country or an old Mentos commercial.”
~ Manohla Dargis’ Deadly Lede For Review Of The Giver