By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

2012 Independent Spirit Awards

BEST FEATURE Silver Linings Playbook

BEST DIRECTOR David O. Russell, Silver Linings Playbook

BEST SCREENPLAY Silver Linings Playbook

BEST FIRST FEATURE The Perks of Being a Wallflower

BEST FIRST SCREENPLAY Safety Not Guaranteed

JOHN CASSAVETES AWARD (Best feature made for under $500,000) Middle of Nowhere

BEST FEMALE LEAD Jennifer Lawrence, Silver Linings Playbook

BEST MALE LEAD John Hawkes, The Sessions

BEST SUPPORTING FEMALE Helen Hunt, The Sessions

BEST SUPPORTING MALE Matthew McConaughey, Magic Mike

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY Beasts of the Southern Wild

BEST DOCUMENTARY The Invisible War

BEST INTERNATIONAL FILM Amour

16th ANNUAL PIAGET PRODUCERS AWARD ($25,000) Mynette Louie

19th ANNUAL SOMEONE TO WATCH AWARD ($25,000) Adam Leon, Gimme the Loot

STELLA ARTOIS TRUER THAN FICTION AWARD ($25,000) Peter Nicks, The Waiting Room

ROBERT ALTMAN AWARD (Director, casting director, ensemble cast) Starlet
Director Sean Baker
Casting Director Julia Kim
Cast Dree Hemingway, Besedka Johnson, Karren Karagulian, Stella Maeve, James Ransone

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“There are critics who see their job as to be on the side of the artist, or in a state of imaginative sympathy or alliance with the artist. I think it’s important for a critic to be populist in the sense that we’re on the side of the public. I think one of the reasons is, frankly, capitalism. Whether you’re talking about restaurants or you’re talking about movies, you’re talking about large-scale commercial enterprises that are trying to sell themselves and market themselves and publicize themselves. A critic is, in a way, offering consumer advice. I think it’s very, very important in a time where everything is commercialized, commodified, and branded, where advertising is constantly bleeding into other forms of discourse, for there to be an independent voice kind of speaking to—and to some extent on behalf of—the public.”
~ A. O. Scott On One Role Of The Critic

“Every night, we’d sit and talk for a long, long time and talk about the process and I knew he was very, very intrigued about what could be happening. Then of course, one of the fascinating things he told me about was how he had readers who were reading for him that never knew it was Stanley Kubrick. So if he heard of a novel, he would send it out to people. I think he did it through newspaper ads at the time. And he would send it out to people and ask for a kind of synopsis or a critique of the novel. And he would read those. And it was done anonymously. But he said there were housewives and there were barristers and all sorts of people doing that. And I thought, yeah, that’s a really good way to open up the possibilities. Because otherwise, you’re randomly looking, walking through a bookstore or an airport. I said, “How many people are doing this?” It was about 30 people.”
~ George Miller’s Conversations With Kubrick