By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

2012 Independent Spirit Awards

BEST FEATURE Silver Linings Playbook

BEST DIRECTOR David O. Russell, Silver Linings Playbook

BEST SCREENPLAY Silver Linings Playbook

BEST FIRST FEATURE The Perks of Being a Wallflower

BEST FIRST SCREENPLAY Safety Not Guaranteed

JOHN CASSAVETES AWARD (Best feature made for under $500,000) Middle of Nowhere

BEST FEMALE LEAD Jennifer Lawrence, Silver Linings Playbook

BEST MALE LEAD John Hawkes, The Sessions

BEST SUPPORTING FEMALE Helen Hunt, The Sessions

BEST SUPPORTING MALE Matthew McConaughey, Magic Mike

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY Beasts of the Southern Wild

BEST DOCUMENTARY The Invisible War

BEST INTERNATIONAL FILM Amour

16th ANNUAL PIAGET PRODUCERS AWARD ($25,000) Mynette Louie

19th ANNUAL SOMEONE TO WATCH AWARD ($25,000) Adam Leon, Gimme the Loot

STELLA ARTOIS TRUER THAN FICTION AWARD ($25,000) Peter Nicks, The Waiting Room

ROBERT ALTMAN AWARD (Director, casting director, ensemble cast) Starlet
Director Sean Baker
Casting Director Julia Kim
Cast Dree Hemingway, Besedka Johnson, Karren Karagulian, Stella Maeve, James Ransone

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“One of my favorite things in watching any performance on film is when there isn’t a lot of cutting going on and when you get a chance to become really absorbed in the artist in hand. The same way we do, hopefully, at a concert, when we get a chance to really trip in to something that’s happening on stage. Whether the singer’s singing, or one of the other musicians is playing, we sort of stay there instead of cutting round with our eyes a lot.”
~ Jonathan Demme

“We’ve talked about this before in the past, my obsession with the Shakespearean histories having the ideal combination of the sweet and the sour. In ‘Henry IV, Part II’ which we’ve discussed before, in the end of that story it’s very complex and haunting because Prince Hal becomes Henry the King, and he has transcended his hoodlum days and at the ceremony is Falstaff, his good friend with whom he has really fucked around and been a loser with, and Falstaff comes up to him and says, ‘Now that you’re king we can really party,’ and the king famously says, ‘I know thee not, old man.’ It becomes Henry IV’s anointment and Falstaff’s catastrophe. That’s life. I have experienced very little unfettered triumph. There are moments, such as when my children are born, but even that comes with new fears and anxieties. In a sense the better you can communicate that life is both at once, the more powerful over time something becomes. One strives for something where the threads are there because it lasts in way that is very palpable. The idea of a tragedy is powerful in literature and theater, but in cinema it doesn’t work, certainly not commercially, and less so critically. Why is that? I think it has to do with how movies are so close to us.”
~ James Gray