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Ray Pride

By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Yo La Tengo’s “I’ll Be Around” (4’49”), as seen in Bon Appetit

Video by Phil Morrison.
From Bon Appetit:
Why did you decide to put the recipe, and the rest of the text, over the video?
Ira Kaplan: It was the director’s idea, and we liked it. I think the first thought was that we liked the idea of information–there’s lyrics, there’s lyrics that aren’t part of the song, and there’s the recipe onscreen. I think it’s at a point where the text provides information, but it also obfuscates as well. I don’t think anyone knew until they saw it if it was going to work, but conceptually, it had the capacity of touching on a couple of bases that would otherwise be hard to show visually.
Why the eating scene?
IK: I’m not dying to talk about the meaning of the song, but we felt that it was appropriate to the spirit of the song, and I don’t think in particularly obscure ways… [Bass player] James McNew has made the tortilla before, but we hadn’t made the tortilla soup. So the tortilla was the first part of the menu, then we needed a complete meal.
And were you actually cooking it on-screen?
IK: Oh yeah. We’re not actors.

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DENNIS COOPER

The next thing that really changed my world and thoroughly influenced my writing were the films of Robert Bresson. When I discovered them in the late seventies, I felt I had found the final ingredient I needed to write the fiction I wanted to write.

INTERVIEWER

What was the final ingredient?

DENNIS COOPER

Recognizing that the films were entirely about emotion and, to me, ­ profoundly moving while, at the same time, stylistically inexpressive and monotonic. On the surface, they were nothing but style, and the style was extremely rigorous to boot, but they seemed almost transparent and purely content driven. Bresson’s use of untrained nonactors influenced my concentration on characters who are amateurs or noncharacters or characters who are ill equipped to handle the job of manning a story line or holding the reader’s attention in a conventional way. Altogether, I think Bresson’s films had the greatest influence on my work of any art I’ve ever encountered. In fact, the first fiction of mine that was ever published was a chapbook called “Antoine Monnier,” which was a god-awful, incompetent attempt to rewrite Bresson’s film Le diable ­probablement as a pornographic novella. So I came to writing novels through a channel that included experimental fiction, poetry, and nonliterary influences pretty much exclusively. I never read normal novels with any real interest or close attention.
~ Dennis Cooper Discovers Bresson

The whole world within reach.
~ Filmmaker Peter Hutton

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