By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Sundance World Premiere “UPSTREAM COLOR” Hits U.S. Theaters April 2013

ROR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Filmmaker Shane Carruth Leads Creative Distribution Team

New York, January 15, 2013 – In a move reflective of the new creative distribution options available to artists, filmmaker Shane Carruth has confirmed that his company, erbp, will be distributing UPSTREAM COLOR theatrically in the U.S. The second film from the award-winning writer and director will open in New York at the IFC Center on April 5, before expanding in a platform release schedule in over 20 markets including Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle, Boston, Dallas, and Chicago. Digital distribution will follow in May with Cable VOD, iTunes, Amazon, YouTube, Hulu, Xbox, Sony Entertainment Network, VUDU and Netflix and DVD/Blu-ray–all in fluidity with the film’s theatrical expansion.

“As a filmmaker you try to make a compelling case for an audience to stick around minute by minute with what is on the screen,” said Carruth. “By also crafting the marketing we’re still doing that, still storytelling, but we’re trying to make a case for an audience to show up. Hopefully for viewers, framing the film this way and staying true to the film’s intent makes it a bit more of an intimate relationship.”

Shane’s creative team, which will be comprised of specific moving parts that equal a scalable distribution model, includes theatrical booker Michael Tuckman, publicists Susan Norget at Susan Norget Film Promotion and Alex Klenert at Prodigy PR, online strategist Roger Tinch, producer Casey Gooden, and the Sundance Institute’s #ArtistServices Project.

UPSTREAM COLOR debuts in U.S. Dramatic Competition Monday, January 21 before audiences at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival–a venue Carruth returns to years later after winning the 2004 Grand Jury Prize there for his first film PRIMER. The cult hit was recently re-released on the top digital retailers along with direct downloads from the film’s website. UPSTREAM COLOR will have its European Premiere at the Berlin International Film Festival in mid-February.

Last night UPSTREAM COLOR screened privately for an industry-only audience of theatre owners and programmers who attend the annual Art House Convergence in Utah, an event taking place days before the Sundance Film Festival begins.

The film, starring Amy Seimetz, is written and directed by Carruth, who also composed the original score, is the director of photography, and co-edited the film alongside fellow Sundance Film Festival 2013 alumni David Lowery. It was produced by Casey Gooden, Ben LeClair. and Meredith Burke.

Upstream Color Site /  Twitter @UpstreamColor / Facebook Dot Com Slash Upstream Color

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“When Bay keeps these absurd plot-gears spinning, he’s displaying his skill as a slick, professional entertainer. But then there are the images of motion—I hesitate to say, of things in motion, because it’s not clear how many things there are in the movie, instead of mere digital simulations of things. It doesn’t matter. What matters is that there’s a car chase through London, seen from the level of tires, that could have gone on for an hour, um, tirelessly. What matters is that the defenestrated Cade saves himself by leaping from drone to drone in midair like a frog skipping among lotus pads; that he and Vivian slide along the colossal, polished expanses of sharply tilting age-old fields of metal like luge Olympians. What matters is that, when this heroic duo find themselves thrust out into the void of inner space from a collapsing planet, it has a terrifyingly vast emptiness that Bay doesn’t dare hold for more than an instant lest he become the nightmare-master. What matters is that the enormous thing hurtling toward Earth is composed in a fanatical detail that would repay slow-motion viewing with near-geological patience. Bay has an authentic sense of the gigantic; beside the playful enormity of his Transformerized universe, the ostensibly heroic dimensions of Ridley Scott’s and Christopher Nolan’s massive visions seem like petulant vanities.”
~ Michael Bay Gives Richard Brody A Tingle

How do you see film evolving in this age of Netflix?

I thought the swing would be quicker and more violent. There have been two landmark moments in the history of French film. First in 1946, with the creation of the CNC under the aegis of Malraux. He saved French cinema by establishing the advance on receipts and support fund mechanisms. We’re all children of this political invention. Americans think that the State gives money to French films, but they’re wrong. Through this system, films fund themselves!

The other great turning point came by the hand of Jack Lang in the 1980s, after the creation of Canal+. While television was getting ready to become the nemesis of film, he created the decoder, and a specific broadcasting space between film and television, using new investments for film. That once again saved French film.

These political decisions are important. We’re once again facing big change. If our political masters don’t take control of the situation and new stakeholders like Netflix, Google and Amazon, we’re headed for disaster. We need to create obligations for Internet service providers. They can’t always be against film. They used to allow piracy, but now that they’ve become producers themselves, they’re starting to see things in a different light. This is a moment of transition, a strong political act needs to be put forward. And it can’t just be at national level, it has to happen at European level.

Filmmaker Cédric Klapisch