By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Sundance World Premiere “UPSTREAM COLOR” Hits U.S. Theaters April 2013

ROR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Filmmaker Shane Carruth Leads Creative Distribution Team

New York, January 15, 2013 – In a move reflective of the new creative distribution options available to artists, filmmaker Shane Carruth has confirmed that his company, erbp, will be distributing UPSTREAM COLOR theatrically in the U.S. The second film from the award-winning writer and director will open in New York at the IFC Center on April 5, before expanding in a platform release schedule in over 20 markets including Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle, Boston, Dallas, and Chicago. Digital distribution will follow in May with Cable VOD, iTunes, Amazon, YouTube, Hulu, Xbox, Sony Entertainment Network, VUDU and Netflix and DVD/Blu-ray–all in fluidity with the film’s theatrical expansion.

“As a filmmaker you try to make a compelling case for an audience to stick around minute by minute with what is on the screen,” said Carruth. “By also crafting the marketing we’re still doing that, still storytelling, but we’re trying to make a case for an audience to show up. Hopefully for viewers, framing the film this way and staying true to the film’s intent makes it a bit more of an intimate relationship.”

Shane’s creative team, which will be comprised of specific moving parts that equal a scalable distribution model, includes theatrical booker Michael Tuckman, publicists Susan Norget at Susan Norget Film Promotion and Alex Klenert at Prodigy PR, online strategist Roger Tinch, producer Casey Gooden, and the Sundance Institute’s #ArtistServices Project.

UPSTREAM COLOR debuts in U.S. Dramatic Competition Monday, January 21 before audiences at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival–a venue Carruth returns to years later after winning the 2004 Grand Jury Prize there for his first film PRIMER. The cult hit was recently re-released on the top digital retailers along with direct downloads from the film’s website. UPSTREAM COLOR will have its European Premiere at the Berlin International Film Festival in mid-February.

Last night UPSTREAM COLOR screened privately for an industry-only audience of theatre owners and programmers who attend the annual Art House Convergence in Utah, an event taking place days before the Sundance Film Festival begins.

The film, starring Amy Seimetz, is written and directed by Carruth, who also composed the original score, is the director of photography, and co-edited the film alongside fellow Sundance Film Festival 2013 alumni David Lowery. It was produced by Casey Gooden, Ben LeClair. and Meredith Burke.

Upstream Color Site /  Twitter @UpstreamColor / Facebook Dot Com Slash Upstream Color

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