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By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Sundance World Premiere “UPSTREAM COLOR” Hits U.S. Theaters April 2013

ROR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Filmmaker Shane Carruth Leads Creative Distribution Team

New York, January 15, 2013 – In a move reflective of the new creative distribution options available to artists, filmmaker Shane Carruth has confirmed that his company, erbp, will be distributing UPSTREAM COLOR theatrically in the U.S. The second film from the award-winning writer and director will open in New York at the IFC Center on April 5, before expanding in a platform release schedule in over 20 markets including Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle, Boston, Dallas, and Chicago. Digital distribution will follow in May with Cable VOD, iTunes, Amazon, YouTube, Hulu, Xbox, Sony Entertainment Network, VUDU and Netflix and DVD/Blu-ray–all in fluidity with the film’s theatrical expansion.

“As a filmmaker you try to make a compelling case for an audience to stick around minute by minute with what is on the screen,” said Carruth. “By also crafting the marketing we’re still doing that, still storytelling, but we’re trying to make a case for an audience to show up. Hopefully for viewers, framing the film this way and staying true to the film’s intent makes it a bit more of an intimate relationship.”

Shane’s creative team, which will be comprised of specific moving parts that equal a scalable distribution model, includes theatrical booker Michael Tuckman, publicists Susan Norget at Susan Norget Film Promotion and Alex Klenert at Prodigy PR, online strategist Roger Tinch, producer Casey Gooden, and the Sundance Institute’s #ArtistServices Project.

UPSTREAM COLOR debuts in U.S. Dramatic Competition Monday, January 21 before audiences at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival–a venue Carruth returns to years later after winning the 2004 Grand Jury Prize there for his first film PRIMER. The cult hit was recently re-released on the top digital retailers along with direct downloads from the film’s website. UPSTREAM COLOR will have its European Premiere at the Berlin International Film Festival in mid-February.

Last night UPSTREAM COLOR screened privately for an industry-only audience of theatre owners and programmers who attend the annual Art House Convergence in Utah, an event taking place days before the Sundance Film Festival begins.

The film, starring Amy Seimetz, is written and directed by Carruth, who also composed the original score, is the director of photography, and co-edited the film alongside fellow Sundance Film Festival 2013 alumni David Lowery. It was produced by Casey Gooden, Ben LeClair. and Meredith Burke.

Upstream Color Site /  Twitter @UpstreamColor / Facebook Dot Com Slash Upstream Color

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“Film criticism as a business operates like the film industry itself: The people in charge like to hire people who remind them of themselves, and those people at the top are by and large straight white dudes (baseball caps are an option). That’s not to say they can’t have wildly diverging opinions on a variety of topics, but privilege comes with blinders that are often hard to acknowledge and even tougher to remove. The past few months have seen some of the most prominent film publications taking on new writers who are for the most part white men: Rolling Stone, Film Comment, Indiewire, and of course, Owen Gleiberman at Variety. Many of them have championed underdog filmmakers, but you can’t get over the sense of gatekeeping going on. Film criticism often feels like the treehouse girls are banned from entering, and it’s not hard to assume the conversations we’re missing out on aren’t exactly centered on women in the business… Our world and our art suffers when we limit the number of perspectives allowed to not only tell the story but to discuss it. Women are no better or worse in their opinions than men, but the key differences we bring allow further dimensions in the narrative. Whether they’re conscious of it or not, the ingrained biases of white maleness will continue unchallenged without contrasting voices under the banner, and the commodification of women’s faces and bodies will exacerbate to increasingly damaging levels.”
~ Ceilidhann

DENNIS COOPER

The next thing that really changed my world and thoroughly influenced my writing were the films of Robert Bresson. When I discovered them in the late seventies, I felt I had found the final ingredient I needed to write the fiction I wanted to write.

INTERVIEWER

What was the final ingredient?

DENNIS COOPER

Recognizing that the films were entirely about emotion and, to me, ­ profoundly moving while, at the same time, stylistically inexpressive and monotonic. On the surface, they were nothing but style, and the style was extremely rigorous to boot, but they seemed almost transparent and purely content driven. Bresson’s use of untrained nonactors influenced my concentration on characters who are amateurs or noncharacters or characters who are ill equipped to handle the job of manning a story line or holding the reader’s attention in a conventional way. Altogether, I think Bresson’s films had the greatest influence on my work of any art I’ve ever encountered. In fact, the first fiction of mine that was ever published was a chapbook called “Antoine Monnier,” which was a god-awful, incompetent attempt to rewrite Bresson’s film Le diable ­probablement as a pornographic novella. So I came to writing novels through a channel that included experimental fiction, poetry, and nonliterary influences pretty much exclusively. I never read normal novels with any real interest or close attention.
~ Dennis Cooper Discovers Bresson

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