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By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Sundance World Premiere “UPSTREAM COLOR” Hits U.S. Theaters April 2013

ROR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Filmmaker Shane Carruth Leads Creative Distribution Team

New York, January 15, 2013 – In a move reflective of the new creative distribution options available to artists, filmmaker Shane Carruth has confirmed that his company, erbp, will be distributing UPSTREAM COLOR theatrically in the U.S. The second film from the award-winning writer and director will open in New York at the IFC Center on April 5, before expanding in a platform release schedule in over 20 markets including Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle, Boston, Dallas, and Chicago. Digital distribution will follow in May with Cable VOD, iTunes, Amazon, YouTube, Hulu, Xbox, Sony Entertainment Network, VUDU and Netflix and DVD/Blu-ray–all in fluidity with the film’s theatrical expansion.

“As a filmmaker you try to make a compelling case for an audience to stick around minute by minute with what is on the screen,” said Carruth. “By also crafting the marketing we’re still doing that, still storytelling, but we’re trying to make a case for an audience to show up. Hopefully for viewers, framing the film this way and staying true to the film’s intent makes it a bit more of an intimate relationship.”

Shane’s creative team, which will be comprised of specific moving parts that equal a scalable distribution model, includes theatrical booker Michael Tuckman, publicists Susan Norget at Susan Norget Film Promotion and Alex Klenert at Prodigy PR, online strategist Roger Tinch, producer Casey Gooden, and the Sundance Institute’s #ArtistServices Project.

UPSTREAM COLOR debuts in U.S. Dramatic Competition Monday, January 21 before audiences at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival–a venue Carruth returns to years later after winning the 2004 Grand Jury Prize there for his first film PRIMER. The cult hit was recently re-released on the top digital retailers along with direct downloads from the film’s website. UPSTREAM COLOR will have its European Premiere at the Berlin International Film Festival in mid-February.

Last night UPSTREAM COLOR screened privately for an industry-only audience of theatre owners and programmers who attend the annual Art House Convergence in Utah, an event taking place days before the Sundance Film Festival begins.

The film, starring Amy Seimetz, is written and directed by Carruth, who also composed the original score, is the director of photography, and co-edited the film alongside fellow Sundance Film Festival 2013 alumni David Lowery. It was produced by Casey Gooden, Ben LeClair. and Meredith Burke.

Upstream Color Site /  Twitter @UpstreamColor / Facebook Dot Com Slash Upstream Color

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“Oh it was just hellish. This is the worst thing that ever happened to me. It would be stupid for me to say that I didn’t know what I was getting into. It has taken me five years to decide on a first film and I always held out for something like this. The lesson to be learned is that you can’t take on an enterprise of this size and scope if you don’t have a movie like The Terminator or Jaws behind you. Because when everybody’s wringing their handkerchiefs and sweating and puking blood over the money, it’s very nice to be able to say, ‘This is the guy who directed the biggest grossing movie of all time, sit down, shut up and feel lucky that you’ve got him.’ It’s another thing when you are there and you’re going ‘Trust me, this is really what I believe in,’ and they turn round and say ‘Well, who the hell is this guy?’ If I make ten shitty movies, I’ll deserve the flak and if I go on to make 10 great ones, this’ll probably be looked upon as my first bungled masterpiece.”
~ David Fincher, 1992

 

“I was a brat back when I made Pootie Tang. I was dealing with people every day whose pressures I didn’t understand, and I wasn’t very nice about how I said no to them. I put myself in a position I didn’t have to be in. A lot of what makes this kind of stuff work is empathy. If you’re taking money from somebody, they have a right to look after it. It’s all just trying to be clear about the arrangement. That’s why when I set up ‘Louie,’ I just said, ‘This is what I’m comfortable doing, and if you don’t want to do it, I don’t blame you. But in exchange, I’ll take very little money.’ I was only getting $200,000 per show from them, which is insane, and it goes up just by tiny increments every year. The other part of the arrangement with FX is that if this stops working for them, they should just tell me and we’ll stop doing it. Contractually, FX has a right to demand that the scripts be filtered through them before I shoot them, just like any other show. But from the beginning, they haven’t read anything, and they like the show. If I start turning in shit, then they’re going to start asking to see scripts, and that’s perfectly fair.”
~ Louis C. K.

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