By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Sundance Film MILKSHAKE Acquired For Kevin Smith Movie Club

Phase 4 Films acquires Sundance 2013 NEXT film, MILKSHAKE, the directorial debut of David Andalman and Mariko Munro, for its Kevin Smith Movie Club


New York, January 28, 2013 – Berry Meyerowitz, President & CEO of Phase 4 Films, announced today that the Company has acquired the dark comedy MILKSHAKE from Sundance’s NEXT program.  Starring Tyler Ross (Wise Kids), Shareeka Epps (Half Nelson), Georgia Ford and Eshan Bay, MILKSHAKE is the directorial debut for David Andalman and Mariko Munro.  The film was written and produced by David Andalman and Mariko Munro and executive produced by Vinay Singh and Jason Sosnoff.

Set in the mid-1990s, MILKSHAKE follows the tragic sex life of Jolie Jolson (Tyler Ross), a wannabe thug (and great-great-grandson of legendary vaudevillian Al Jolson) in suburban DC as he strives to become something he can never be – black.

MILKSHAKE will be released this summer in theaters and on VOD via the Company’s KEVIN SMITH MOVIE CLUB across all cable, telco and digital platforms.

Sundance Alum Kevin Smith says “I love Milkshake!  There: have fun at the fat guy’s expense. As a guy who shopped at Oak Tree for most of the 90’s, the yearnin’-to-be-urban main character brought so vividly to life by Tyler Ross really hit home with me.  Shareeka Epps dazzles as the long-suffering sorta-girlfriend, quietly commanding the screen like she did in Half Nelson.  Packed with laughs and the benefit of hindsight, this realistic high school indie reminded me of the best entries in that genre – a sort of Welcome to the Dollhouse for fly guys.  We’re hyped ’cause we’re amped to bring David Andalman and Mariko Munro’s Milkshake to the Kevin Smith Movie Club!”

“We are excited by the opportunity to share our movie with Kevin Smith – a writer-director who we deeply respect.  We now know our film will be seen by an audience that will enjoy the shenanigans that make up Milkshake,” says first time filmmaker Mariko Munro.

Fellow co-director and writer David Andalman says, “We are thrilled to be working with Phase 4 Films and Kevin Smith.  As first time Sundance filmmakers, who were inspired at a young age by “Clerks,” among other Kevin Smith movies, we feel there couldn’t be a better pairing for Milkshake.”

The deal was negotiated by Phase 4’s Katharyn Howe and Linzee Troubh of Cinetic Media on behalf of the filmmakers.

About Phase 4 Films
Phase 4 Films distributes feature films and special interest content across all traditional theatrical and new media platforms in North America.  The company’s previous releases include the provocatively sexy road movie HICK, starring Chloë Grace Moretz, Blake Lively, and Eddie Redmayne; 2011 Sundance award-winner ANOTHER HAPPY DAY, Sam Levinson’s dark comedy about a dysfunctional family, starring Ellen Barkin, Demi Moore, and Ezra Miller; the Canadian tour of Kevin Smith’s RED STATE, starring Michael Parks, Melissa Leo and John Goodman; and Carrie Preston’s Sundance 2012 hit comedy THAT’S WHAT SHE SAID starring Anne Heche, Marcia DeBonis, and Alia Shawkat. Upcoming releases for the company include Megan Griffith’s 2012 SXSW Audience Award Winner, EDEN, starring Jamie Chung and Beau Bridges, and Mark L Mann’s directorial debut GENERATION UM, starring Keanu Reeves (THE MATRIX, CONSTANTINE).  For more information, please visit  HYPERLINK “http://www.phase4films.com” www.phase4films.com.

 

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“When Bay keeps these absurd plot-gears spinning, he’s displaying his skill as a slick, professional entertainer. But then there are the images of motion—I hesitate to say, of things in motion, because it’s not clear how many things there are in the movie, instead of mere digital simulations of things. It doesn’t matter. What matters is that there’s a car chase through London, seen from the level of tires, that could have gone on for an hour, um, tirelessly. What matters is that the defenestrated Cade saves himself by leaping from drone to drone in midair like a frog skipping among lotus pads; that he and Vivian slide along the colossal, polished expanses of sharply tilting age-old fields of metal like luge Olympians. What matters is that, when this heroic duo find themselves thrust out into the void of inner space from a collapsing planet, it has a terrifyingly vast emptiness that Bay doesn’t dare hold for more than an instant lest he become the nightmare-master. What matters is that the enormous thing hurtling toward Earth is composed in a fanatical detail that would repay slow-motion viewing with near-geological patience. Bay has an authentic sense of the gigantic; beside the playful enormity of his Transformerized universe, the ostensibly heroic dimensions of Ridley Scott’s and Christopher Nolan’s massive visions seem like petulant vanities.”
~ Michael Bay Gives Richard Brody A Tingle

How do you see film evolving in this age of Netflix?

I thought the swing would be quicker and more violent. There have been two landmark moments in the history of French film. First in 1946, with the creation of the CNC under the aegis of Malraux. He saved French cinema by establishing the advance on receipts and support fund mechanisms. We’re all children of this political invention. Americans think that the State gives money to French films, but they’re wrong. Through this system, films fund themselves!

The other great turning point came by the hand of Jack Lang in the 1980s, after the creation of Canal+. While television was getting ready to become the nemesis of film, he created the decoder, and a specific broadcasting space between film and television, using new investments for film. That once again saved French film.

These political decisions are important. We’re once again facing big change. If our political masters don’t take control of the situation and new stakeholders like Netflix, Google and Amazon, we’re headed for disaster. We need to create obligations for Internet service providers. They can’t always be against film. They used to allow piracy, but now that they’ve become producers themselves, they’re starting to see things in a different light. This is a moment of transition, a strong political act needs to be put forward. And it can’t just be at national level, it has to happen at European level.

Filmmaker Cédric Klapisch