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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

Sundance ’13: Day One

The tone seems to be being set by opening night this year.

There is a Pablo Larrain thing going on, as he produced Crystal Fairy & The Magical Cactus and 2012, and his star from No co-created the doc, Who Is Diyani Cristal ?. Pablo’s Oscar-nominated No is also here. Of course, part of the “Pablo thing” is a South American thing, as the indie world continues to lean harder and harder on international films and not American Indie. A.I. is still in the house, in the Dramatic Competition, but I feel like there is a sense that the awards show is becoming the ghetto here and the real interesting stuff is elsewhere. (Crystal Fairy is in the World Dramatic Competition.)

Blue Caprice is going to be a hot topic as the festival moves on (it opens Saturday), combining the cool distance of European cinema with a very American issue – especially right now – of gun violence as a solution for the disaffected. Add on top of that an awards-level performance by Isaiah Washington and there will be talk about why the film is in the “Next” section and not in the main competition over some of the more expected Sundance fare.

And then there is the sex. We’ve already seen Gaby Hoffman running around buck naked – and not highly sexualized – in the title role of Crystal Fairy. But just wait til they get a load of dick. James Franco is the finger in the ass of Sundance this year, with two strong pieces. One is, in theory, about recreating the missing footage from Billy Friedkin’s Cruising. But it’s not. It’s much more about the idea of how much sex of a presumably different persuasion a straight guy can take. And then, Kink.com, which Franco produced, is about a fetish site that produces a lot of content of all flavors. Of course, they are also a business, so almost exactly like Gawker, they rank the response to the material each in-house director creates and everyone is paid accordingly. But both movies are about limits, ultimately. What are they? Should we all be considering broader ones… even if we ultimately reject them? And how much of this is choice – not on a participatory level, but on one’s personal turn-ons or offs – and how much of it is just part of who each of us is.

Let’s hope the entire festival is a bumpy, bumpy ride.

2 Responses to “Sundance ’13: Day One”

  1. A Moose says:

    Billy?

    Really- who the bloody hell are you to refer to Mr Friedkin in that matter?

  2. brack says:

    Hey David, did you catch Before Midnight?

    I hear the buzz on that one is good. Guess I will buy the inevitable Blu-ray box set.

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