By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

SONY PICTURES CLASSICS ACQUIRES SUNDANCE HIT KILL YOUR DARLINGS

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                        

NEW YORK (January 22, 2013) – Sony Pictures Classics announced today that they have acquired all US, Australian, New Zealand, South African, African TV, and Eastern European (minus CIS which has already been sold) rights to John Krokidas’ directorial feature debut, KILL YOUR DARLINGS. Co-written by Krokidas and Austin Bunn, KILL YOUR DARLINGS stars Daniel Radcliffe, Dane DeHaan, Michael C. Hall, Ben Foster, Jack Huston, Elizabeth Olsen, David Cross, and Jennifer Jason Leigh. The film is a US Dramatic competition feature at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival and premiered to a standing ovation on Friday.

KILL YOUR DARLINGS is produced by Krokidas, Benaroya Pictures’ Michael Benaroya, Christine Vachon of Killer Films and Rose Ganguzza and is executive produced by Benaroya Pictures’ Head of Production Joe Jenckes, Stefan Sonnenfeld, Jared Ian Goldman, Killer Films’ Pamela Koffler, and Randy Manis.

The film is the previously untold story of a murder that brought together a young Allen Ginsberg (Radcliffe), Jack Kerouac (Huston) and William Burroughs (Foster) at Columbia University in 1944, providing the spark that would lead to their Beat Revolution.

“To be considered amongst the ranks of Pedro Almodóvar and Woody Allen is beyond my wildest dreams,” said Krokidas. “Sony Pictures Classics is truly the perfect place for this film. This is a dream come true.”

Sony Pictures Classics adds, “This is an amazing movie, a great American drama, thriller, and perfect evocation of New York in the 1940’s as you have never seen on screen before. With an ensemble cast that is truly mind-blowing led by Daniel Radcliffe in a profoundly moving performance as Allen Ginsberg, we are witnessing the birth of a major new American filmmaker. Producers Michael Benaroya and Christine Vachon have truly outdone themselves here. It is a privilege to bring a film that works on so many levels to American audiences.”

KILL YOUR DARLINGS was negotiated by SPC and UTA’s Rena Ronson along with Cassian Elwes.

ABOUT SONY PICTURES CLASSICS

Michael Barker and Tom Bernard serve as co-presidents of Sony Pictures Classics—an autonomous division of Sony Pictures Entertainment they founded with Marcie Bloom in January 1992, which distributes, produces, and acquires independent films from around the world.

Barker and Bernard have released prestigious films that have won 29 Academy Awards (25 of those at Sony Pictures Classics) and have garnered 135 Academy Award nominations (109 at Sony Pictures Classics) including Best Picture nominations for AMOUR, MIDNIGHT IN PARIS, AN EDUCATION, CAPOTE, HOWARDS END, AND CROUCHING TIGER, HIDDEN DRAGON.

ABOUT SONY PICTURES ENTERTAINMENT

Sony Pictures Entertainment (SPE) is a subsidiary of Sony Corporation of America, a subsidiary of Tokyo-based Sony Corporation. SPE’s global operations encompass motion picture production and distribution; television production and distribution; home entertainment acquisition and distribution; a global channel network; digital content creation and distribution; operation of studio facilities; development of new entertainment products, services and technologies; and distribution of entertainment in more than 142 countries. For additional information, go to http://www.sonypictures.com/.

 

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Tsangari: With my next film, White Knuckles, it comes with a budget — it’s going to be a huge new world for me. As always when I enter into a new thing, don’t you wonder how it’s going to be and how much of yourself you are going to have to sacrifice? The ballet of all of this. I’m already imaging the choreography — not of the camera, but the choreography of actually bringing it to life. It is as fascinating as the shooting itself. I find the producing as exciting as the directing. The one informs the other. There is this producer-director hat that I constantly wear. I’ve been thinking about these early auteurs, like Howard Hawks and John Ford and Preston Sturges—all of these guys basically were hired by the studio, and I doubt they had final cut, and somehow they had films that now we can say they had their signatures.  There are different ways of being creative within the parameters and limitations of production. The only thing you cannot negotiate is stupidity.
Filmmaker: And unfortunately, there is an abundance of that in the world.
Tsangari: This is the only big risk: stupidity. Everything else is completely worked out in the end.
~ Chevalier‘s Rachel Athina Tsangari

“The middle-range movies that I was doing have largely either stopped being made, or they’ve moved to television, now that television is a go-to medium for directors who can’t get work in theatricals, because there are so few theatricals being made. But also with the new miniseries concept, you can tell a long story in detail without having to cram it all into 90 minutes. You don’t have to cut the characters and take out the secondary people. You can actually put them all on a big canvas. And it is a big canvas, because people have bigger screens now, so there’s no aesthetic difference between the way you shoot a movie and the way you shoot a TV show.

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~ Joe Dante

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