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By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

SONY PICTURES CLASSICS ACQUIRES FOR NO GOOD REASON

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                        

NEW YORK (January 30, 2013) - Sony Pictures Classics announced today that they have acquired all North American rights to Charlie Paul’s directorial debut, FOR NO GOOD REASON from Itch Film.   Foreign sales are being handled by Independent Film Sales.  Charlie Paul, who has been a director in advertising for years and is a former artist himself, spent 10 years making FOR NO GOOD REASON. Produced by Itch Film’s co-founder Lucy Paul, the intimate documentary portrait focuses on Ralph Steadman and features Johnny Depp observing Steadman’s fascinating working process at his home studio.

 

Ralph Steadman is most frequently celebrated for his brilliant illustrations accompanying the writings of Hunter S Thompson, and their collaborations defined the Gonzo school of journalism that emerged to pick at the scabs of the American establishment during the turbulent eras of Vietnam and Nixon. Among his many achievements, Steadman has drawn political and satirical work informed by a deep social conscience, illustrated classics such as Alice in Wonderland and Animal Farm, printed etchings on writers from Shakespeare to Burroughs, and published books on the lives of Sigmund Freud, Leonardo da Vinci and God. FOR NO GOOD REASON presents Steadman as a driven artist with a voracious creative instinct.

 

The film also features a phenomenal and inventive soundtrack with collaborations from Slash, All American Rejects, Jason Mraz, Lynval Golding, Ed Harcourt, James Blake, Crystal Castles and more. Grammy nominated and two time Ivor Novello winner, Sacha Skarbek is the music director.

 

“Working with Ralph Steadman and using his art as the palette to construct this film, created the perfect canvass for me to make something personal, profound and very beautiful,” says Director Charlie Paul.

 

Producer Lucy Paul adds, “We are thrilled to be working with Sony Pictures Classics, whose love of the film and inventive approach to marketing will ensure our film finds the exposure and audience it deserves.”

 

“Ralph Steadman is one of the most profound and innovative artists of our generation.  We have always admired his work and in this wonderful film, Charlie Paul opens Steadman’s studio and unique creative process to both his admirers and new fans in the process,” states Sony Pictures Classics.

 

 

 

 

‘For No Good Reason Pic1’ – Ralph Steadman and Johnny Depp in Ralph’s Studio, Kent, UK.

Photographer:Charlie Paul

 

 

‘HUNTER-Vintage DR. GONZO’ – Ralph Steadman art created for Fear & Loathing in Las Vegas

 

 

ABOUT SONY PICTURES CLASSICS

 

Michael Barker and Tom Bernard serve as co-presidents of Sony Pictures Classics—an autonomous division of Sony Pictures Entertainment they founded with Marcie Bloom in January 1992, which distributes, produces, and acquires independent films from around the world.

 

Barker and Bernard have released prestigious films that have won 29 Academy Awards® (25 of those at Sony Pictures Classics) and have garnered 135 Academy Award® nominations (109 at Sony Pictures Classics) including Best Picture nominations for AMOUR, MIDNIGHT IN PARIS, AN EDUCATION, CAPOTE, HOWARDS END, AND CROUCHING TIGER, HIDDEN DRAGON.

 

 

ABOUT SONY PICTURES ENTERTAINMENT

 

Sony Pictures Entertainment (SPE) is a subsidiary of Sony Corporation of America, a subsidiary of Tokyo-based Sony Corporation. SPE’s global operations encompass motion picture production and distribution; television production and distribution; home entertainment acquisition and distribution; a global channel network; digital content creation and distribution; operation of studio facilities; development of new entertainment products, services and technologies; and distribution of entertainment in more than 142 countries. For additional information, go to http://www.sonypictures.com/.

 

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“Chad Harbach spent ten years writing his novel. It was his avocation, for which he was paid nothing, with no guarantee he’d ever be paid anything, while he supported himself doing freelance work, for which I don’t think he ever made $30,000 a year. I sold his book for an advance that equated to $65,000 a year—before taxes and commission—for each of the years of work he’d put in. The law schools in this country churn out first-year associates at white-shoe firms that pay them $250,000 a year, when they’re twenty-five years of age, to sit at a desk doing meaningless bullshit to grease the wheels of the corporatocracy, and people get upset about an excellent author getting $65,000 a year? Give me a fucking break.”
~ Book Agent Chris Parris-Lamb On The State Of The Publishing Industry

INTERVIEWER
Do you think this anxiety of yours has something to do with being a woman? Do you have to work harder than a male writer, just to create work that isn’t dismissed as being “for women”? Is there a difference between male and female writing?

FERRANTE
I’ll answer with my own story. As a girl—twelve, thirteen years old—I was absolutely certain that a good book had to have a man as its hero, and that depressed me. That phase ended after a couple of years. At fifteen I began to write stories about brave girls who were in serious trouble. But the idea remained—indeed, it grew stronger—that the greatest narrators were men and that one had to learn to narrate like them. I devoured books at that age, and there’s no getting around it, my models were masculine. So even when I wrote stories about girls, I wanted to give the heroine a wealth of experiences, a freedom, a determination that I tried to imitate from the great novels written by men. I didn’t want to write like Madame de La Fayette or Jane Austen or the Brontës—at the time I knew very little about contemporary literature—but like Defoe or Fielding or Flaubert or Tolstoy or Dostoyevsky or even Hugo. While the models offered by women novelists were few and seemed to me for the most part thin, those of male novelists were numerous and almost always dazzling. That phase lasted a long time, until I was in my early twenties, and it left profound effects.
~ Elena Ferrante, Paris Review Art Of Fiction No. 228

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