By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

SONY PICTURES CLASSICS ACQUIRES FOR NO GOOD REASON

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                        

NEW YORK (January 30, 2013) – Sony Pictures Classics announced today that they have acquired all North American rights to Charlie Paul’s directorial debut, FOR NO GOOD REASON from Itch Film.   Foreign sales are being handled by Independent Film Sales.  Charlie Paul, who has been a director in advertising for years and is a former artist himself, spent 10 years making FOR NO GOOD REASON. Produced by Itch Film’s co-founder Lucy Paul, the intimate documentary portrait focuses on Ralph Steadman and features Johnny Depp observing Steadman’s fascinating working process at his home studio.

 

Ralph Steadman is most frequently celebrated for his brilliant illustrations accompanying the writings of Hunter S Thompson, and their collaborations defined the Gonzo school of journalism that emerged to pick at the scabs of the American establishment during the turbulent eras of Vietnam and Nixon. Among his many achievements, Steadman has drawn political and satirical work informed by a deep social conscience, illustrated classics such as Alice in Wonderland and Animal Farm, printed etchings on writers from Shakespeare to Burroughs, and published books on the lives of Sigmund Freud, Leonardo da Vinci and God. FOR NO GOOD REASON presents Steadman as a driven artist with a voracious creative instinct.

 

The film also features a phenomenal and inventive soundtrack with collaborations from Slash, All American Rejects, Jason Mraz, Lynval Golding, Ed Harcourt, James Blake, Crystal Castles and more. Grammy nominated and two time Ivor Novello winner, Sacha Skarbek is the music director.

 

“Working with Ralph Steadman and using his art as the palette to construct this film, created the perfect canvass for me to make something personal, profound and very beautiful,” says Director Charlie Paul.

 

Producer Lucy Paul adds, “We are thrilled to be working with Sony Pictures Classics, whose love of the film and inventive approach to marketing will ensure our film finds the exposure and audience it deserves.”

 

“Ralph Steadman is one of the most profound and innovative artists of our generation.  We have always admired his work and in this wonderful film, Charlie Paul opens Steadman’s studio and unique creative process to both his admirers and new fans in the process,” states Sony Pictures Classics.

 

 

 

 

‘For No Good Reason Pic1’ – Ralph Steadman and Johnny Depp in Ralph’s Studio, Kent, UK.

Photographer:Charlie Paul

 

 

‘HUNTER-Vintage DR. GONZO’ – Ralph Steadman art created for Fear & Loathing in Las Vegas

 

 

ABOUT SONY PICTURES CLASSICS

 

Michael Barker and Tom Bernard serve as co-presidents of Sony Pictures Classics—an autonomous division of Sony Pictures Entertainment they founded with Marcie Bloom in January 1992, which distributes, produces, and acquires independent films from around the world.

 

Barker and Bernard have released prestigious films that have won 29 Academy Awards® (25 of those at Sony Pictures Classics) and have garnered 135 Academy Award® nominations (109 at Sony Pictures Classics) including Best Picture nominations for AMOUR, MIDNIGHT IN PARIS, AN EDUCATION, CAPOTE, HOWARDS END, AND CROUCHING TIGER, HIDDEN DRAGON.

 

 

ABOUT SONY PICTURES ENTERTAINMENT

 

Sony Pictures Entertainment (SPE) is a subsidiary of Sony Corporation of America, a subsidiary of Tokyo-based Sony Corporation. SPE’s global operations encompass motion picture production and distribution; television production and distribution; home entertainment acquisition and distribution; a global channel network; digital content creation and distribution; operation of studio facilities; development of new entertainment products, services and technologies; and distribution of entertainment in more than 142 countries. For additional information, go to http://www.sonypictures.com/.

 

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“When Bay keeps these absurd plot-gears spinning, he’s displaying his skill as a slick, professional entertainer. But then there are the images of motion—I hesitate to say, of things in motion, because it’s not clear how many things there are in the movie, instead of mere digital simulations of things. It doesn’t matter. What matters is that there’s a car chase through London, seen from the level of tires, that could have gone on for an hour, um, tirelessly. What matters is that the defenestrated Cade saves himself by leaping from drone to drone in midair like a frog skipping among lotus pads; that he and Vivian slide along the colossal, polished expanses of sharply tilting age-old fields of metal like luge Olympians. What matters is that, when this heroic duo find themselves thrust out into the void of inner space from a collapsing planet, it has a terrifyingly vast emptiness that Bay doesn’t dare hold for more than an instant lest he become the nightmare-master. What matters is that the enormous thing hurtling toward Earth is composed in a fanatical detail that would repay slow-motion viewing with near-geological patience. Bay has an authentic sense of the gigantic; beside the playful enormity of his Transformerized universe, the ostensibly heroic dimensions of Ridley Scott’s and Christopher Nolan’s massive visions seem like petulant vanities.”
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How do you see film evolving in this age of Netflix?

I thought the swing would be quicker and more violent. There have been two landmark moments in the history of French film. First in 1946, with the creation of the CNC under the aegis of Malraux. He saved French cinema by establishing the advance on receipts and support fund mechanisms. We’re all children of this political invention. Americans think that the State gives money to French films, but they’re wrong. Through this system, films fund themselves!

The other great turning point came by the hand of Jack Lang in the 1980s, after the creation of Canal+. While television was getting ready to become the nemesis of film, he created the decoder, and a specific broadcasting space between film and television, using new investments for film. That once again saved French film.

These political decisions are important. We’re once again facing big change. If our political masters don’t take control of the situation and new stakeholders like Netflix, Google and Amazon, we’re headed for disaster. We need to create obligations for Internet service providers. They can’t always be against film. They used to allow piracy, but now that they’ve become producers themselves, they’re starting to see things in a different light. This is a moment of transition, a strong political act needs to be put forward. And it can’t just be at national level, it has to happen at European level.

Filmmaker Cédric Klapisch