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By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

Oscar Sidebars

  • In the acting categories, four individuals are first-time nominees (Bradley Cooper, Hugh Jackman, Emmanuelle Riva, Quvenzhané Wallis). Nine of the nominees, including all of the Supporting Actor nominees, are previous acting winners (Daniel Day-Lewis, Denzel Washington, Alan Arkin, Robert De Niro, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Tommy Lee Jones, Christoph Waltz, Sally Field, Helen Hunt).
  • Jessica Chastain is the only one of this year’s acting nominees who was also nominated last year. She received a Supporting Actress nomination for The Help.
  • At 85 years old, Emmanuelle Riva becomes the oldest Best Actress nominee. Nine-year-old Quvenzhané Wallis becomes the youngest Best Actress nominee. This marks the first time since the earliest Awards that records for the oldest and youngest nominees in a single acting category have been set in the same year. The oldest nominee across all the acting categories remains Gloria Stuart, who was 87 when she received a Supporting Actress nomination for Titanic (1997). The youngest acting nominee overall is Justin Henry, who was eight years old when he received a Supporting Actor nomination for Kramer vs. Kramer (1979).
  • Amour is the fifth film to be nominated for both Best Picture and Best Foreign Language Film. The others were Z, which won the Foreign Language Film award in 1969; The Emigrants, a Foreign Language Film nominee in 1971 and a Best Picture nominee in 1972; Life Is Beautiful, which won the Foreign Language Film award in 1998; and Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, the Foreign Language Film winner in 2000.
  • Emmanuelle Riva’s nominated performance is in French. Five performers have won Academy Awards for roles using spoken languages other than English. They are Sophia Loren (1961, Actress in Two Women), Robert De Niro (1974, Supporting Actor in The Godfather Part II), Roberto Benigni (1998, Actor in Life Is Beautiful), Benicio Del Toro (2000, Supporting Actor in Traffic) and Marion Cotillard (2007, Actress in La Vie en Rose). In addition, Marlee Matlin received the 1986 Best Actress award for a performance almost entirely in American Sign Language.
  • Silver Linings Playbook is the first film to receive nominations for Best Picture, Directing, Writing and all four acting categories since Reds (1981).
  • Kathleen Kennedy and Steven Spielberg share the record for the most Best Picture nominations for individual producers with eight each.
  • With his Best Picture nomination for Argo, George Clooney joins Warren Beatty as the only individuals to have competitive nominations for Best Picture, directing, writing and acting.
  • John Williams has more nominations than any other living person, extending his lead with 48 (the only person with more is Walt Disney at 59). Woody Allen has the second-highest number of nominations among living persons at 23. Williams also extends his record for the most music scoring nominations with 43.
  • Michael Kahn is now the most-nominated film editor, having received his eighth nomination this year.
  • Thomas Newman’s nomination for Original Score for Skyfall is his eleventh and brings the total for members of the Newman family (Alfred, Lionel, Emil, Thomas, David and Randy) to 87, more than any other family. With his Original Screenplay nomination for Moonrise Kingdom, Roman Coppola becomes the sixth member of the extended Coppola family (Carmine Coppola, Francis Ford Coppola, Talia Shire, Nicolas Cage and Sofia Coppola) to receive a nomination, for a family total of 24.

Best Picture Release Dates

  • Beasts of the Southern Wild – June 27, 2012
  • Argo – October 12, 2012
  • Lincoln – November 9, 2012
  • Silver Linings Playbook – November 16, 2012
  • Life of Pi – November 21, 2012
  • Amour – December 19, 2012
  • Zero Dark Thirty – December 19, 2012
  • Les Misérables – December 24, 2012
  • Django Unchained – December 25, 2012

Best Picture:

  • Scott Rudin has 4 pic noms in the last three years
  • Spielberg and Kennedy extend their best pic nom count to 8; most of any persons since the award started going to individual producers beginning with the 1951 (24th) awards
  • George Clooney becomes only the second person (along with Warren Beatty) to have competitive nominations for picture, directing, writing and acting. (n.b. Chaplin honorary 1927/28 (1st) – To Charles Chaplin, for acting, writing, directing and producing “The Circus.”)

Les Miserables info:

  • Last musical nommed for best picture was Chicago (2002 75th) [there have been other music-related films after this, just not musicals per se]
  • Last actress nommed from a musical was Penelope Cruz, Nine (2009 82nd)
  • Last actor nommed from a musical was Johnny Depp, Sweeney Todd (2007 80th)

Age:

  • Trintignant would be oldest leading actor at 82 years
  • Riva would be oldest leading actress at 85 (Gloria Stuart is oldest over all acting noms)
  • Q. Wallis would be youngest nominee in leading actress at 9 years (Justin Henry is youngest over all acting noms at 8 years and most likely Jackie Cooper is also younger at 9 years.) Honorary winners who are younger include: Shirley Temple (6), Vincent Winter (7), Margaret O’Brien (8)
  • Jennifer Lawrence would be the 3rd youngest 2-time actress nominee, and the 4th youngest 2-time acting nominee (Angela Lansbury, Sal Mineo, Kate Winslet)

Nomination spans:

  • Maggie Smith would have nominations spanning 48 years (first nom for Othello, 1965 38th), second only to Katharine Hepburn spanning 49 years (1932/33 6th – 1981 54th)
  • Alan Arkin would have nominations spanning 47 years (first nom for The Russians Are Coming, 1966 39th)

Kathryn Bigelow:

  • First woman to have more than one directing nomination
  • First woman to be nominated for directing and picture twice (only other woman to have dir & pic noms is Sofia Coppola)
  • Only the sixth woman to have more than one pic nom

Family groups:

  • Roman Coppola would be the 6th member of the Coppola family to be nominated (matched only by the Newmans)
  • Thomas Newman would bring the total noms for the Newman family to 86+, more than any other family.

John Williams:

  • Extends his record for most noms of any living filmmaker with 48 noms
  • Extends his record for most music scoring noms with 43 noms

Film Editing:

  • Michael Kahn would become the most nominated film editor with 8 noms

Foreign Language:

  • France extends its lead of most noms to 37.
  • France and/or Canada would have 5 noms in the last 10 years

Makeup:

  • Rick Baker extends his lead for most noms to 12

Sound Editing:

  • Richard Hymns would have the most noms with 9

Christopher Boyes:

  • Has the most nominations of any person over the last 10 years (2003 76th – 2012 85th) with 9+ noms

Visual Effects

  • Chris Corbould multi-noms: only 4 people have 2 vis fx noms in same year: Glenn Robinson (1976), Richard Edlund (1984), Tom Woodruff (1992), John Frazier (2007). No one has had 3 noms in same year.
  • John Frazier and/or Joe Letteri would have 6 noms in this category over the last 10 years (2003 76th – 2012 85th)

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Tsangari: With my next film, White Knuckles, it comes with a budget — it’s going to be a huge new world for me. As always when I enter into a new thing, don’t you wonder how it’s going to be and how much of yourself you are going to have to sacrifice? The ballet of all of this. I’m already imaging the choreography — not of the camera, but the choreography of actually bringing it to life. It is as fascinating as the shooting itself. I find the producing as exciting as the directing. The one informs the other. There is this producer-director hat that I constantly wear. I’ve been thinking about these early auteurs, like Howard Hawks and John Ford and Preston Sturges—all of these guys basically were hired by the studio, and I doubt they had final cut, and somehow they had films that now we can say they had their signatures.  There are different ways of being creative within the parameters and limitations of production. The only thing you cannot negotiate is stupidity.
Filmmaker: And unfortunately, there is an abundance of that in the world.
Tsangari: This is the only big risk: stupidity. Everything else is completely worked out in the end.
~ Chevalier‘s Rachel Athina Tsangari

“The middle-range movies that I was doing have largely either stopped being made, or they’ve moved to television, now that television is a go-to medium for directors who can’t get work in theatricals, because there are so few theatricals being made. But also with the new miniseries concept, you can tell a long story in detail without having to cram it all into 90 minutes. You don’t have to cut the characters and take out the secondary people. You can actually put them all on a big canvas. And it is a big canvas, because people have bigger screens now, so there’s no aesthetic difference between the way you shoot a movie and the way you shoot a TV show.

“Which is all for the good. But what’s happened in the interim is that theatrical movies being a spectacle business are now either giant blockbuster movies that run three hours—even superhero movies run three hours, they used to run like 58 minutes!—and the others, which are dysfunctional family independent movies or the slob comedy or the kiddie movie, and those are all low-budget. So the middle ground of movies that were about things, they’re just gone. Or else they’re on HBO. Like the Bryan Cranston LBJ movie, which years ago would’ve been made for theaters.

“You’ve got people like Paul Schrader and Walter Hill who can’t get their movies theatrically distributed because there’s no market for it. So they end up going to VOD, and VOD is a model from which no one makes any money, because most of the time, as soon as they get on the site, they’re pirated. So the whole model of the system right now is completely broken. And whether or not anybody’s going to try to fix, or if it even can be fixed, I don’t know. But it’s certainly not the same business that I got into in the ’70s.”
~ Joe Dante

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