By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

National Society Of Film Critics 2012 Awards

National Society Of Film Critics

Best Picture: Amour
Best Director: Michael Haneke
Best Actor: Daniel Day-Lewis
Best Actress: Emmanuelle Riva
Best Screenplay: Tony Kushner
Best Supporting Actor: Matthew McConaughey, Magic Mike and Bernie
Best Supporting Actress: Amy Adams, The Master
Best Cinematography: Mihai Malaimare, Jr., The Master
Best Nonfiction Film: The Gatekeepers
Best Experimental Film: This Is Not a Film
Film Heritage Prizes: Laurence Kardish; Milestone Film and Video

2 Responses to “National Society Of Film Critics 2012 Awards”

  1. Daniella Isaacs says:

    Hummm. Well, I have to say they’ve had the best track record (in terms of my taste, anyway) of all the awards giving groups in the past, though I wouldn’t give prizes to Kushner or McConaughey this year. I guess I have to see AMOUR as soon as it comes my way.

  2. Al Alexander says:

    Amour is incredibly overrated. And Amy Adams, really? Almost as nonsensical as McConaughey choice. Spots should have gone to Sally Field and Alan Arkin

Quote Unquotesee all »

“I never accepted the term contrarian. I think that’s offensive, frankly. And my response to that is: if I’m a contrarian, what are other reviewers? What I strive to do is be a good critic, not somebody who simply accepts the product put in front of me. I guess it scares people to think that they don’t have any originality; that they don’t have the capacity to think for themselves.

“There’s a line a lot of reviewers use that I don’t like at all. They say ‘accept the film on its own terms.’ What that really means is, ‘accept the film as it is advertised.’ That’s got nothing to do with criticism. Nothing to do with having a response as a film watcher. A thinking person has to analyze what’s on screen, not simply rubber-stamp it or kowtow to marketing.”m

“To me, everything does have a political component and I think it’s an interesting way to look at art. It’s one way that makes film reviewing, I think, a politically relevant form of journalism. We do live in a political world, and we bring our political sense to the movies with us – unless you’re the kind of person who goes to the movies and shuts off the outside world. I’m not that kind of person.”
~ Armond White to Luke Buckmaster

“One of comedy’s defining pathologies, alongside literal pathologies like narcissism and self-loathing, is its swaggering certainty that it is part of the political vanguard, while upholding one of the most rigidly patriarchal hierarchies of any art form.”
~ Lindy West