By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

National Society Of Film Critics 2012 Awards

National Society Of Film Critics

Best Picture: Amour
Best Director: Michael Haneke
Best Actor: Daniel Day-Lewis
Best Actress: Emmanuelle Riva
Best Screenplay: Tony Kushner
Best Supporting Actor: Matthew McConaughey, Magic Mike and Bernie
Best Supporting Actress: Amy Adams, The Master
Best Cinematography: Mihai Malaimare, Jr., The Master
Best Nonfiction Film: The Gatekeepers
Best Experimental Film: This Is Not a Film
Film Heritage Prizes: Laurence Kardish; Milestone Film and Video

2 Responses to “National Society Of Film Critics 2012 Awards”

  1. Daniella Isaacs says:

    Hummm. Well, I have to say they’ve had the best track record (in terms of my taste, anyway) of all the awards giving groups in the past, though I wouldn’t give prizes to Kushner or McConaughey this year. I guess I have to see AMOUR as soon as it comes my way.

  2. Al Alexander says:

    Amour is incredibly overrated. And Amy Adams, really? Almost as nonsensical as McConaughey choice. Spots should have gone to Sally Field and Alan Arkin

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“There are critics who see their job as to be on the side of the artist, or in a state of imaginative sympathy or alliance with the artist. I think it’s important for a critic to be populist in the sense that we’re on the side of the public. I think one of the reasons is, frankly, capitalism. Whether you’re talking about restaurants or you’re talking about movies, you’re talking about large-scale commercial enterprises that are trying to sell themselves and market themselves and publicize themselves. A critic is, in a way, offering consumer advice. I think it’s very, very important in a time where everything is commercialized, commodified, and branded, where advertising is constantly bleeding into other forms of discourse, for there to be an independent voice kind of speaking to—and to some extent on behalf of—the public.”
~ A. O. Scott On One Role Of The Critic

“Every night, we’d sit and talk for a long, long time and talk about the process and I knew he was very, very intrigued about what could be happening. Then of course, one of the fascinating things he told me about was how he had readers who were reading for him that never knew it was Stanley Kubrick. So if he heard of a novel, he would send it out to people. I think he did it through newspaper ads at the time. And he would send it out to people and ask for a kind of synopsis or a critique of the novel. And he would read those. And it was done anonymously. But he said there were housewives and there were barristers and all sorts of people doing that. And I thought, yeah, that’s a really good way to open up the possibilities. Because otherwise, you’re randomly looking, walking through a bookstore or an airport. I said, “How many people are doing this?” It was about 30 people.”
~ George Miller’s Conversations With Kubrick