By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

National Society Of Film Critics 2012 Awards

National Society Of Film Critics

Best Picture: Amour
Best Director: Michael Haneke
Best Actor: Daniel Day-Lewis
Best Actress: Emmanuelle Riva
Best Screenplay: Tony Kushner
Best Supporting Actor: Matthew McConaughey, Magic Mike and Bernie
Best Supporting Actress: Amy Adams, The Master
Best Cinematography: Mihai Malaimare, Jr., The Master
Best Nonfiction Film: The Gatekeepers
Best Experimental Film: This Is Not a Film
Film Heritage Prizes: Laurence Kardish; Milestone Film and Video

2 Responses to “National Society Of Film Critics 2012 Awards”

  1. Daniella Isaacs says:

    Hummm. Well, I have to say they’ve had the best track record (in terms of my taste, anyway) of all the awards giving groups in the past, though I wouldn’t give prizes to Kushner or McConaughey this year. I guess I have to see AMOUR as soon as it comes my way.

  2. Al Alexander says:

    Amour is incredibly overrated. And Amy Adams, really? Almost as nonsensical as McConaughey choice. Spots should have gone to Sally Field and Alan Arkin

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Actually, by Hollywood standards, you’re right, I said. That is unambitious.

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~ Swanberg On Swanberg By Borelli

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