By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

ENTERTAINMENT ONE EATS UP THE US RIGHTS TO JIM MICKLE THRILLER WE ARE WHAT WE ARE

CRITICALLY ACCLAIMED SUNDANCE FILM ACQUIRED BY eONE FOR U.S. THEATRICAL DISTRIBUTION

 

LOS ANGELES/TORONTO – January 26, 2013 – Entertainment One (“eOne”) has acquired the U.S. rights to Jim Mickle’s suspenseful horror thriller WE ARE WHAT WE ARE for a theatrical release planned for later this year.  The film premiered to major critical acclaim this week at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival.

In WE ARE WHAT WE ARE, a re-imagining of the 2010 Mexican film of the same name, Jim Mickle paints a gripping and gruesome portrait of an introverted family struggling to keep their macabre traditions alive.

A seemingly wholesome and benevolent family, the Parkers have always kept to themselves, and for good reason. Behind closed doors, patriarch Frank (Bill Sage, “Boardwalk Empire”) rules his family with a rigorous ferver, determined to keep his ancestral customs intact at any cost.  As a torrential rainstorm moves into the area, tragedy strikes and his daughters Iris (Ambyr Childers, THE MASTER) and Rose (Julia Garner, MARTHA MARCY MAY MARLENE) are forced to assume responsibilities that extend beyond those of a typical family.  The film also stars Michael Parks (DJANGO UNCHAINED), Kelly McGillis (STAKELAND), Nick Damici (STAKELAND), Wyatt Russell (THIS IS 40) and newcomer Jack Gore.

WE ARE WHAT WE ARE was written by Mickle and Damici.  The two previously collaborated on the screenplays for Mickle’s first two features, MULBERRY STREET and STAKELAND (winner of the “Midnight Madness” Audience Award at the 2010 Toronto International Film Festival).

WE ARE WHAT WE ARE was produced by Rodrigo Bellott, Andrew D. Corkin, Linda Moran, Nicholas Shumaker and Jack Turner.

“We’re so very excited to add WE ARE WHAT WE ARE to our US slate,” said Dylan Wiley, VP Theatrical Marketing and Distribution, eOne Films North America. “Jim Mickle’s talent was obvious in MULBERRY STREET and STAKE LAND, but this film fulfills his vision on a whole new level and will put him in his rightful place among the masters of genre filmmaking.  It will be our pleasure to introduce him to an even wider fan base and we’re confident that audiences will eat up the film.”

“On behalf of the incredible cast and crew of WE ARE WHAT WE ARE, I’m extremely pleased to team up with eOne on a theatrical release and beyond.  The response at Sundance has been amazing and we look forward to continuing the journey with our new partners in crime,” said Jim Mickle.

The deal was negotiated by Mark Ankner and Christine D’Souza for WME Global, Andre des Rochers for Gray Krauss Stratford Des Rochers LLP, Emilie Georges for Memento Films International and Sejin Croninger, VP Worldwide Acquisitions for eOne.  As previously announced, eOne also acquired rights to WE ARE WHAT WE ARE in the UK, Canada, France, Scandinavia and South Africa.  Memento Films International is handling international sales.

WE ARE WHAT WE ARE is expected to hit theatres in the US in late 2013, adding to eOne’s exciting upcoming US lineup which includes; Brian de Palma’s PASSION and Sergio Castellitto’s TWICE BORNThe team is also looking forward to making additional acquisition announcements in the coming weeks.

 

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About Entertainment One

Entertainment One (LSE:ETO) is a leading international entertainment company that specializes in the acquisition, production and distribution of film and television content.  The company’s comprehensive network extends around the globe including Canada, the U.S., the UK, Ireland, Benelux, Spain, France, Scandinavia, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and South Korea.  Through established Entertainment and Distribution divisions, the company provides extensive expertise in film distribution, television and music production, kids programming and merchandising and licensing. Its current rights library is exploited across all media formats and includes more than 35,000 film and television titles, 2,700 hours of television programming and 45,000 music tracks.

 

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Julian Schnabel: Years ago, I was down there with my cousin’s wife Corky. She was wild — she wore makeup on her legs, and she had a streak in her hair like Yvonne De Carlo in “The Munsters.” She liked to paint. I had overalls on with just a T-shirt and looked like whatever. We were trying to buy a bunch of supplies with my cousin Jesse’s credit card. They looked at the credit card, and then they looked at us and thought maybe we stole the card, so they called Jesse up. He was a doctor who became the head of trauma at St. Vincent’s. They said, “There’s somebody here with this credit card and we want to know if it belongs to you.”

He said, “Well, does the woman have dyed blonde hair and fake eyelashes and look like she stepped out of the backstage of some kind of silent movie, and is she with some guy who has wild hair and is kind of dressed like a bum?”

“Yeah, that’s them.”

“Yeah, that’s my cousin and my wife. It’s okay, they can charge it on my card.”
~ Julian Schnabel Remembers NYC’s Now-Shuttered Pearl Paint

MB Cool. I was really interested in the aerial photography from Enter the Void and how one could understand that conceptually as a POV, while in fact it’s more of an objective view of the city where the story takes place. So it’s an objective and subjective camera at the same time. I know that you’re interested in Kubrick. We’ve talked about that in the past because it’s something that you and I have in common—

GN You’re obsessed with Kubrick, too.

MB Does he still occupy your mind or was he more of an early influence?

GN He was more of an early influence. Kubrick has been my idol my whole life, my own “god.” I was six or seven years old when I saw 2001: A Space Odyssey, and I never felt such cinematic ecstasy. Maybe that’s what brought me to direct movies, to try to compete with that “wizard of Oz” behind the film. So then, years later, I tried to do something in that direction, like many other directors tried to do their own, you know, homage or remake or parody or whatever of 2001. I don’t know if you ever had that movie in mind for your own projects. But in my case, I don’t think about 2001 anymore now. That film was my first “trip” ever. And then I tried my best to reproduce on screen what some drug trips are like. But it’s very hard. For sure, moving images are a better medium than words, but it’s still very far from the real experience. I read that Kubrick said about Lynch’s Eraserhead, that he wished he had made that movie because it was the film he had seen that came closest to the language of nightmares.

Matthew Barney and Gaspar Noé