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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30 @ TIFF: The Hunt, co-writer/director Thomas Vinterberg

2 Responses to “DP/30 @ TIFF: The Hunt, co-writer/director Thomas Vinterberg”

  1. berg says:

    good int … obviously a lot of people have not seen The Hunt yet but it is quite the button pusher .. when I saw it last year it had this effect on me where I wanted to yell at the people on the screen who were persecuting Mads, and say “what’s wrong with you people” … which to me is the sign of a great movie

  2. AdamL says:

    My favourite film of the year, which I guess means it’s my favourite film of next year given it hasn’t been released in the States yet.

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