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DP/30 Sneak Peek: Alex Gibney on Zero Dark Thirty @ Sundance 2013

One Response to “DP/30 Sneak Peek: Alex Gibney on Zero Dark Thirty @ Sundance 2013”

  1. JAB says:

    Mr. Gibney nailed it when he said the subject of torture in ZDT is “too hot” right now. I have tremendous respect for him so his opinion actually counts to me.
    I disagree with him here. The first third of the movie probably comes down “pro-torture”. The cut from black screen voices being heard (which mentions the title of the best post 9/11 film, “United 93″, & I doubt I’m the only Paul Greengrass fan who picked up on that unintended reference) to the “enhanced interrogation” is brilliant. The middle of the film muddles the effectiveness of that tactic & by the end of the film it became an afterthought.
    This may sound ridiculous, but Ms. Bigelow did not categorically deny that she her & Mr. Boal may have been spun by sources when she appeared on “The Colbert Report” a couple of weeks ago in that fascinating interview (Colbert=ridiculous?, I know).
    This is 2012’s best film.
    Like Mr. Gibney, I’m a big fan of Bigelow’s but I didn’t like “K19…” & “The Weight Of Water”.

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“One of my favorite things in watching any performance on film is when there isn’t a lot of cutting going on and when you get a chance to become really absorbed in the artist in hand. The same way we do, hopefully, at a concert, when we get a chance to really trip in to something that’s happening on stage. Whether the singer’s singing, or one of the other musicians is playing, we sort of stay there instead of cutting round with our eyes a lot.”
~ Jonathan Demme

“We’ve talked about this before in the past, my obsession with the Shakespearean histories having the ideal combination of the sweet and the sour. In ‘Henry IV, Part II’ which we’ve discussed before, in the end of that story it’s very complex and haunting because Prince Hal becomes Henry the King, and he has transcended his hoodlum days and at the ceremony is Falstaff, his good friend with whom he has really fucked around and been a loser with, and Falstaff comes up to him and says, ‘Now that you’re king we can really party,’ and the king famously says, ‘I know thee not, old man.’ It becomes Henry IV’s anointment and Falstaff’s catastrophe. That’s life. I have experienced very little unfettered triumph. There are moments, such as when my children are born, but even that comes with new fears and anxieties. In a sense the better you can communicate that life is both at once, the more powerful over time something becomes. One strives for something where the threads are there because it lasts in way that is very palpable. The idea of a tragedy is powerful in literature and theater, but in cinema it doesn’t work, certainly not commercially, and less so critically. Why is that? I think it has to do with how movies are so close to us.”
~ James Gray