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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

DP/30 Sneak Peek: Alex Gibney on Zero Dark Thirty @ Sundance 2013

One Response to “DP/30 Sneak Peek: Alex Gibney on Zero Dark Thirty @ Sundance 2013”

  1. JAB says:

    Mr. Gibney nailed it when he said the subject of torture in ZDT is “too hot” right now. I have tremendous respect for him so his opinion actually counts to me.
    I disagree with him here. The first third of the movie probably comes down “pro-torture”. The cut from black screen voices being heard (which mentions the title of the best post 9/11 film, “United 93″, & I doubt I’m the only Paul Greengrass fan who picked up on that unintended reference) to the “enhanced interrogation” is brilliant. The middle of the film muddles the effectiveness of that tactic & by the end of the film it became an afterthought.
    This may sound ridiculous, but Ms. Bigelow did not categorically deny that she her & Mr. Boal may have been spun by sources when she appeared on “The Colbert Report” a couple of weeks ago in that fascinating interview (Colbert=ridiculous?, I know).
    This is 2012′s best film.
    Like Mr. Gibney, I’m a big fan of Bigelow’s but I didn’t like “K19…” & “The Weight Of Water”.

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DEADLINE: How does a visualist feel about people watching your films on a phone or VOD?
REFN: It depends on what kind of movie you make. We had great success with Only God Forgives on multiple platforms in the U.S. Young people will decide how they see it, when they want to see it. Don’t try to fight it. Embrace it. That’s a wonderful opportunity. We’re at the most exciting time since the invention of the wheel, in terms of creativity because distribution and accessibility have changed everything. A camera is still a camera whether it’s digital or not; there’s still sound; an actor is an actor. Ninety-nine percent of what you do is going to be seen on a smart phone – I know this is the greatest thing ever made because it allows people to choose, watching what you do on this format or go into a theater and see it on a screen. That means more people than ever will see what I do, which is personally satisfying in terms of vanity. But you have to be able to adapt, to accept things in different order and length than we’re used to. We are in a very, very exciting time.
~ Nic Refn to Jen Yamato

DEADLINE: You mention Tarantino, who with Christopher Nolan and a few other giants, saved film stock from extinction. To him, showing a digital film in a theater is the equivalent of watching TV in public. Make an argument for why digital is a good film making canvas.
REFN: Costwise, it’s a very effective way for young people to start making movies. You can make your movie on an iPhone. It’s wonderful seeing how my own children use technology to enhance creativity. For me it’s a wonderful canvas. Sure, I love grain in film. I love celluloid. But I also like creativity. I like crayons, I like pencils, I like paint. It’s all relative. Technology is more inclusive. A hundred years ago when film was invented, it was an elitist club. Very few people got to make it, very few people controlled it and very few people owned it. A hundred years later, storytelling through images is everyone’s domain. It’s ultimate capitalism. There are no rules, and no barriers and no Hays Code. Where does this go in another hundred years? I don’t know but I would love to see it.
~ Nic Refn To Jen Yamato