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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

DP/30 Sneak Peek: Alex Gibney on Zero Dark Thirty @ Sundance 2013

One Response to “DP/30 Sneak Peek: Alex Gibney on Zero Dark Thirty @ Sundance 2013”

  1. JAB says:

    Mr. Gibney nailed it when he said the subject of torture in ZDT is “too hot” right now. I have tremendous respect for him so his opinion actually counts to me.
    I disagree with him here. The first third of the movie probably comes down “pro-torture”. The cut from black screen voices being heard (which mentions the title of the best post 9/11 film, “United 93″, & I doubt I’m the only Paul Greengrass fan who picked up on that unintended reference) to the “enhanced interrogation” is brilliant. The middle of the film muddles the effectiveness of that tactic & by the end of the film it became an afterthought.
    This may sound ridiculous, but Ms. Bigelow did not categorically deny that she her & Mr. Boal may have been spun by sources when she appeared on “The Colbert Report” a couple of weeks ago in that fascinating interview (Colbert=ridiculous?, I know).
    This is 2012′s best film.
    Like Mr. Gibney, I’m a big fan of Bigelow’s but I didn’t like “K19…” & “The Weight Of Water”.

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