By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

ADRIAN SMITH NAMED PRESIDENT, SONY PICTURES RELEASING DOMESTIC DISTRIBUTION


Adam Bergerman and John Spinello Named Assistant General Sales Managers

CULVER CITY, Calif., January 29, 2013 – Adrian Smith has been promoted to the position of president of Sony Pictures Releasing Domestic Distribution, it was announced today by Rory Bruer, president of Worldwide Distribution for Sony Pictures Entertainment.  In conjunction with the promotion, Adam Bergerman and John Spinello have been named Assistant General Sales Managers for Domestic Distribution and each will report to Smith.

The promotions are part of a realignment of the studio’s domestic distribution division. Commenting on the announcement, Bruer said, “For nearly 25 years, Adrian has helped to make our domestic team the best in the business. He is one of the most savvy and skilled sales executives in our industry. Adrian is both respected and beloved by our team and our exhibition partners.”

Smith added, “Adam and John collectively bring over 30 years of experience to the company – both have been with us since the mid-1990s and have played key roles in building all of our key franchises, from Spider-Man and Men in Black to Robert Langdon, not to mention the three biggest James Bond films of all time.  It’s an honor to work with two of the most accomplished and well regarded sales executives in the industry and these promotions are well-deserved. I feel privileged to work with such a dynamic and experienced distribution team.”
Smith is a veteran of hundreds of release campaigns, joining Sony Pictures in 1989 as western district manager for TriStar Pictures.  In 2000, he was named senior vice president and western division manager for Sony Pictures Releasing, and in 2011, he was appointed executive vice president and general sales manager, overseeing domestic sales for all Sony Pictures films.  He began his career at Mann Theatres in Westwood in 1976, then segued to the sales department at United Artists in 1979.  He joined 20th Century Fox in 1983, then was appointed branch manager at Cannon Releasing in 1985.

Spinello joined Sony Pictures in 1997 as managing director, Eastern Sales Division and was promoted to vice president, Eastern Sales Division in 2003.  He was again promoted to senior vice president / division manager Eastern Sales Division in 2008.  He began his career at United Artists Theaters in 1991, joining their film division in 1992 and overseeing numerous territories.

Bergerman joined Sony Pictures in 1996 as a booker for the Eastern Division, was promoted to sales manager Eastern Division in 1998, district manager for the Eastern Division in 2001, vice president / managing director for the Eastern Division in 2009, and senior vice president / division manager for the Western Division last year.

About Sony Pictures Entertainment
Sony Pictures Entertainment (SPE) is a subsidiary of Sony Corporation of America, a subsidiary of Tokyo-based Sony Corporation. SPE’s global operations encompass motion picture production and distribution; television production and distribution; home entertainment acquisition and distribution; a global channel network; digital content creation and distribution; operation of studio facilities; development of new entertainment products, services and technologies; and distribution of entertainment in 159 countries. For additional information, go to http://www.sonypictures.com/

– 3 0 –

Leave a Reply

Quote Unquotesee all »

“I was 15 when I first watched Sally Hardesty escape into the back of a pickup truck, covered in blood and cackling like a goddamn witch. All of her friends were dead. She had been kidnapped, tortured and even forced to feed her own blood to her cannibalistic captors’ impossibly shriveled patriarch. Being new to the horror genre, I was sure she was going to die. It had been a few months since I survived a violent sexual assault, where I subsequently ran from my assailant, tripped, fell and fought like hell. I crawled home with bloody knees, makeup-stained cheeks and a new void in both my mind and heart. My sense of safety, my ability to trust others, my willingness to form new relationships and my love of spending time with people I cared about were all taken from me. It wasn’t until I found the original The Texas Chain Saw Massacre that something clicked. It was Sally’s strength, and her resilience. It was watching her survive blows to the head from a hammer. It was watching her break free from her bonds and burst through a glass window. It was watching her get back up after she’d been stabbed. It was watching her crawl into the back of a truck, laughing as it drove away from Leatherface. She was the last one to confront the killer, and live. I remember sitting in front of the TV and thinking, There I am. That’s me.”
~ Lauren Milici On “The Final Girl”

“‘Thriller’ enforced its own reality principle; it was there, part of the every commute, a serenade to every errand, a referent to every purchase, a fact of every life. You didn’t have to like it, you only had to acknowledge it. By July 6, 1984, when the Jacksons played the first show of their ‘Victory’ tour, in Kansas City, Missouri, Jacksonism had produced a system of commodification so complete that whatever and whoever was admitted to it instantly became a new commodity. People were no longer comsuming commodities as such things are conventionally understood (records, videos, posters, books, magazines, key rings, earrings necklaces pins buttons wigs voice-altering devices Pepsis t-shirts underwear hats scarves gloves jackets – and why were there no jeans called Bille Jeans?); they were consuming their own gestures of consumption. That is, they were consuming not a Tayloristic Michael Jackson, or any licensed facsimile, but themselves. Riding a Mobius strip of pure capitalism, that was the transubstantiation.”
~ Greil Marcus On Michael Jackson