By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

A24 Acquires Sundance breakout THE SPECTACULAR NOW

Park City, UT (January 21, 2013) – A24 announced the acquisition of North American rights to Sundance favorite THE SPECTACULAR NOW.  The James Ponsoldt directed film, from a script by Scott Neustadter and Michael Weber, has become one of the darlings of the Sundance Film Festival and features breakout performances by Miles Teller and Shailene Woodley. Film also features wonderful turns by Brie Larson, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Kyle Chandler and Andre Royo. Film premiered on Friday night at Sundance in US Dramatic Competition. A24 will release the film this summer.

“We fell in love with this film the minute that we watched it and we know the rest of the country will embrace this timeless love story. James has directed a wonderful film that depicts young love with complete authenticity and has two young stars giving incredible performances with Miles Teller and Shailene Woodley.” says A24.

Producer Andrew Lauren says, “I am so thrilled that the film has found a home with a company that has such passion for it.  It’s been an amazing Sundance and we are so gratified by the incredibly warm response here.”

THE SPECTACULAR NOW was produced by Tom McNulty, Shawn Levy, Andrew Lauren, and Michelle Krumm.

The deal was negotiated with A24 by UTA Independent Film Group on behalf of the filmmakers. James Ponsoldt is also represented by UTA.

FILM SYNOPSIS:

This adaptation of Tim Tharp’s novel The Spectacular Now captures the insecurity and confusion of adolescence without looking for tidy truths. Young actors rarely portray teens with the maturity that Teller and Woodley display, and they are phenomenal together.  THE SPECTACULAR NOW is a funny, compassionate and poignant love story written by (500) DAYS OF SUMMER scribes Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber, directed by James Ponsoldt (SMASHED) and produced by Tom McNulty, Shawn Levy, Andrew Lauren and Michelle Krumm.

*                      *                      *                      *

ABOUT A24

Launched in the summer of 2012 is a New York-based media company focused on the distribution, financing and production of feature films. The company will distribute, in all media, eight to ten films per year; its initial titles include Roman Coppola’s star-studded comedy A GLIMPSE INSIDE THE MIND OF CHARLES SWAN III, starring Charlie Sheen, Bill Murray and Jason Schwartzman, and Sally Potter’s critically acclaimed GINGER & ROSA starring Elle Fanning, Annette Bening, Alessandro Nivola and Christina Hendricks. The film is also releasing Harmony Korine’s highly-buzzed about SPRING BREAKERS starring Selena Gomez, Vanessa Hudgens, Ashley Benson, Rachel Korine, and James Franco. They also just announced the pick-up of Sofia Coppola’s latest THE BLING RING.

Facebook.com/A24Films

A24Films.com

 – 3 0 –

Leave a Reply

Quote Unquotesee all »

“The worst thing that we have in today’s movie culture is Rotten Tomatoes. It’s the destruction of our business. I have such respect and admiration for film criticism. When I was growing up film criticism was a real art. And there was intellect that went into that. And you would read Pauline’s Kael’s reviews, or some others, and that doesn’t exist anymore. Now it’s about a number. A compounded number of how many positives vs. negatives. Now it’s about, ‘What’s your Rotten Tomatoes score?’ And that’s sad, because the Rotten Tomatoes score was so low on Batman v Superman I think it put a cloud over a movie that was incredibly successful. People don’t realize what goes into making a movie like that. It’s mind-blowing. It’s just insane, it’s hurting the business, it’s getting people to not see a movie. In Middle America it’s, ‘Oh, it’s a low Rotten Tomatoes score so I’m not going to go see it because it must suck.’ But that number is an aggregate and one that nobody can figure out exactly what it means, and it’s not always correct. I’ve seen some great movies with really abysmal Rotten Tomatoes scores. What’s sad is film criticism has disappeared. It’s really sad.”
~ Brett Ratner Has A Sad

“The loss of a local newspaper critic is a real loss. People who know the local audience and know the local cultural scene are very important resources. You can’t just substitute the stuff that comes in from nowhere through syndication or the wire. I think at the same time, some of the newer outlets have really beefed up and improved their coverage and made room for criticism. The real problem is in the more specialized art forms — fine arts, classical music, dance and jazz, say. There is a real slowing of critical voices, partly because those art forms have smaller audiences. Newspapers and magazines can say that doesn’t get enough traffic, so we don’t have room for that. To me, that’s especially worrisome. This is the opposite of what newspapers are supposed to do, which is not to try to figure out what people are already interested in and recite that back to them, but to hopefully guide them to something that they should be interested in, connecting potential audiences with more interesting work.

“Then again, not everyone needs a critic. People have been going to movies for more than 100 years now, and probably the vast majority of those people have not read movie reviews or cared what critics thought. But there has always been an important subset that wants to know more, that wants to think about what they’ve seen and what they’re going to see, and wants someone to think along with. I think critics are important, not just as dispensers of consumer advice — though that’s certainly part of it, too — but as trusted voices and companions for people to argue with in your head when you’re going to movies or afterwards.”
~ A. O. Scott