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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

The Map Of Critics Groups Best Picture Choices Around America

With apologies to Nate Silver…

I’m still not over the presidential elections… so in that spirit, our first ever national critics map. I’ve broken up California and Texas. If anyone is feeling that part of their state is being misrepresented, feel free to speak up and I will address it in the next edition.

Anyone who is wanting to put in claims about which state is leaning which way is also welcome to voice that opinion.

10 Responses to “The Map Of Critics Groups Best Picture Choices Around America”

  1. anoncoward says:

    Unskewed polls says Last Once of Courage and The Oogieloves in the Big Balloon Adventure are clearly going to carry the day. You say tomato, I say a joke from 2 months ago.

  2. Joshua says:

    In case of ambiguity …

    Argo: Florida, Oklahoma, Phoenix, San Diego, St. Louis

    Zero Dark Thirty: Austin, Chicago, New York, Utah, plus also Washington DC (not shown on map), Boston (not shown on map)

    Lincoln: Dallas/Fort Worth

    Silver Linings Playbook: Detroit

    The Master: San Francisco, Kansas City (shown as Kansas on map)

    Safety Not Guaranteed: Indiana

    Amour: Los Angeles

    Life of Pi (assigned a yellowish-green color on map, but not labeled in legend): Las Vegas

  3. Nevada Film Critics Society today went with Argo, so I guess just the Vegas section should be assigned Life of Pi.

  4. Bitplayer says:

    Anybody else think Reacher would have opened bigger with the Rock in the lead instead of Cruise? That casting also would have been a little closer to how he’s portrayed in the book. To me this was a tone deaf attempt at box office pandering, ala casting Tyler Perry in Alex Cross, and it failed miserably. I saw the trailer and a couple of people in the audience said, “when is he gonna give it up?”

  5. GexL says:

    The South Carolina Pee Dee Critics Association* gave it on the first ballot to Skyfall.

    *covers the Florence-Myrtle Beach metro corridor, including Lake City and Olanta

  6. Js Partisan says:

    Yeah, “Jack Reacher” is a tremendous movie and like other people in here, the “Jack Reacher” trailer played great in my “Skyfall” screening.

  7. etguild2 says:

    What the hell is in the water in Indiana? I mean, cute movie and all, but in what universe is “Safety” a contender for any critics’ award?

  8. palmtree says:

    Ditto how I feel about SLP.

  9. Krillian says:

    Massachusetts, New York, Illinois, Texas and Utah all agree on Zero Dark Thirty being Best Picture. If that’s not a bipartisan collection, then Doctor Who shouldn’t have bothered forestalling our Mayan Apocalypse.

  10. SamLowry says:

    I concur with the WTF responses to “Safety”. If not for Aubrey Plaza I would’ve considered it a waste of my time and $1.20 rental fee. But it was still terribly predictable and I decided halfway through that a) we will see a time machine at the end, and b) it will work, for one simple reason: the machine’s creator was portrayed as “Hollywood crazy”, meaning cute and quirky and easy to like, as opposed to “bag lady crazy”, where you just want to run away from this horrific beast while trying without success to scrub their insane ramblings from your brain.

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