2012 Critics Awards: Detroit Film Critics Society

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BEST FILMSilver Linings Playbook

BEST DIRECTOR: David O. Russell, Silver Linings Playbook

BEST ACTOR: Daniel Day-Lewis, Lincoln

BEST ACTRESS Jennifer Lawrence, Silver Linings Playbook

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR Robert De Niro, Silver Linings Playbook

List with nominees here.

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS Anne Hathaway, Les Miserables

BEST ENSEMBLE Lincoln

BREAKTHROUGH Zoe Kazan, Ruby Sparks

BEST SCREENPLAY David O. Russell, Silver Linings Playbook

BEST DOCUMENTARY Jiro Dreams of Sushi

Full list with nominees here.

One Response to “2012 Critics Awards: Detroit Film Critics Society”

  1. Joe Clinton says:

    Bravo! A romantic comedy/drama is easy to dismiss amonst all the other “important” films out now. It is the execution by all concerned that lifts “Silver Linings” above so many of its genre. I am quite pleased with these choices.

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“I am just grateful I am still around. I would love to be Steven Soderbergh, but I am lucky to be Joe Swanberg. Actors want to work with me, people want to give me money, and my nightmare scenario remains: Getting in bed with a studio, spending years on a movie, and it turns out horrible, but now I’m rich.”

Actually, by Hollywood standards, you’re right, I said. That is unambitious.

“It is, and yet, if you can go to bed happy at night, doing what you want, isn’t that ambition for a lifetime?”
~ Swanberg On Swanberg By Borelli

“In retrospect, nothing of that kind surprised me about Philip, because his intuition was luminous from the instant you met him. So was his intelligence. A lot of actors act intelligent, but Philip was the real thing: a shining, artistic polymath with an intelligence that came at you like a pair of headlights and enveloped you from the moment he grabbed your hand, put a huge arm round your neck and shoved a cheek against yours; or if the mood took him, hugged you to him like a big, pudgy schoolboy, then stood and beamed at you while he took stock of the effect.”
John le Carré on Philip Seymour Hoffman