2012 Critics Awards: St. Louis Film Critics

2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013

Best Film:         Argo

Best Director:         Ben Affleck (Argo)

Best Actor:         Daniel Day-Lewis (Lincoln)

Best Actress:         Jessica Chastain (Zero Dark Thirty)

Best Supporting Actor:         Christoph Waltz (Django Unchained)

Best Supporting Actress:         (Tie): Ann Dowd (Compliance)  and Helen Hunt (The Sessions)

Best Original Screenplay:         Zero Dark Thirty (Mark Boal)

Best Adapted Screenplay:         (Tie): Lincoln (Tony Kushner)  and Silver Linings Playbook (David O. Russell)

Best Cinematography:         Skyfall (Roger Deakins)

Best Visual Effects:         Life of Pi

Best Music:         (Tie): Django Unchained and Moonrise Kingdom

Best Foreign-Language Film:         The Intouchables

Best Documentary:         Searching for Sugar Man

Best Comedy:         (Tie): Moonrise Kingdom and Ted

Best Animated Film:         Wreck-It Ralph

 

Special Merit (for best scene, cinematic technique or other memorable aspect or moment)

(Four-way Tie):

Django Unchained – The bag head bag/mask problems scene

Hitchcock – Anthony Hopkins in lobby conducting to music/audience’s reaction during Psycho screening

The Impossible – Opening tsunami scene

The Master – The first processing questioning scene between Philip Seymour Hoffman and Joaquin Phoenix

 

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“There’s a mass belief that if you’re texting, you’re somehow not interrupting the conversation—you’re not being rude. It’s an illusion of multitasking. I started filmmaking when people didn’t expect to have a phone on set, when it would’ve been seen as unprofessional to pull out a phone. Phones have become a huge distraction, and people work much better without them. At first it causes difficulty, but it really allows them to concentrate on what they’re doing. Everybody understands. I’ve had a lot of crews thank me. With a set, we’re trying to create a bubble of alternate reality.”
~ Christopher Nolan

“I’ve always loved films that approach sound in an impressionistic way and that is an unusual approach for a mainstream blockbuster, but I feel it’s the right approach for this experiential film. Many of the filmmakers I’ve admired over the years have used sound in bold and adventurous ways. I don’t agree with the idea that you can only achieve clarity through dialogue. Clarity of story, clarity of emotions—I try to achieve that in a very layered way using all the different things at my disposal—picture and sound.”
~ Christopher Nolan