2012 Critics Awards: St. Louis Film Critics

2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013

Best Film:         Argo

Best Director:         Ben Affleck (Argo)

Best Actor:         Daniel Day-Lewis (Lincoln)

Best Actress:         Jessica Chastain (Zero Dark Thirty)

Best Supporting Actor:         Christoph Waltz (Django Unchained)

Best Supporting Actress:         (Tie): Ann Dowd (Compliance)  and Helen Hunt (The Sessions)

Best Original Screenplay:         Zero Dark Thirty (Mark Boal)

Best Adapted Screenplay:         (Tie): Lincoln (Tony Kushner)  and Silver Linings Playbook (David O. Russell)

Best Cinematography:         Skyfall (Roger Deakins)

Best Visual Effects:         Life of Pi

Best Music:         (Tie): Django Unchained and Moonrise Kingdom

Best Foreign-Language Film:         The Intouchables

Best Documentary:         Searching for Sugar Man

Best Comedy:         (Tie): Moonrise Kingdom and Ted

Best Animated Film:         Wreck-It Ralph

 

Special Merit (for best scene, cinematic technique or other memorable aspect or moment)

(Four-way Tie):

Django Unchained – The bag head bag/mask problems scene

Hitchcock – Anthony Hopkins in lobby conducting to music/audience’s reaction during Psycho screening

The Impossible – Opening tsunami scene

The Master – The first processing questioning scene between Philip Seymour Hoffman and Joaquin Phoenix

 

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“The purpose of film isn’t to present the kindness of the world.”
~ Isabelle Huppert

The Promised Land steers into the fact that the United States can mean whatever people want it to mean. You may not be able to be Elvis, but you can sure as shit impersonate him for a living. America, like its current President (at least as of this article’s publication), is so dangerous precisely because it’s a blank canvas on which anyone can project their dreams. Whatever it is that you see for yourself, there’s someone you can pay for the pleasure of believing that it’s possible. In his view, the pursuit of happiness is the ultimate con, a delusion that prevents us from seeing our circumstances for what they are.

“Forget the Matrix, it’s the invention of happiness that blinded us to the truth. The rich got richer and the poor help them do it. Jarecki doesn’t argue that the American Dream is dead; he argues that it was never alive in the first place — that we were all lobsters in a pot full of water that was boiling too slowly for any of us to notice. And now it’s time for dinner. Donald J. Trump is the President of the United States. Elvis has left the building.”
~ David Ehrlich