2012 Critics Awards: St. Louis Film Critics

2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013

Best Film:         Argo

Best Director:         Ben Affleck (Argo)

Best Actor:         Daniel Day-Lewis (Lincoln)

Best Actress:         Jessica Chastain (Zero Dark Thirty)

Best Supporting Actor:         Christoph Waltz (Django Unchained)

Best Supporting Actress:         (Tie): Ann Dowd (Compliance)  and Helen Hunt (The Sessions)

Best Original Screenplay:         Zero Dark Thirty (Mark Boal)

Best Adapted Screenplay:         (Tie): Lincoln (Tony Kushner)  and Silver Linings Playbook (David O. Russell)

Best Cinematography:         Skyfall (Roger Deakins)

Best Visual Effects:         Life of Pi

Best Music:         (Tie): Django Unchained and Moonrise Kingdom

Best Foreign-Language Film:         The Intouchables

Best Documentary:         Searching for Sugar Man

Best Comedy:         (Tie): Moonrise Kingdom and Ted

Best Animated Film:         Wreck-It Ralph

 

Special Merit (for best scene, cinematic technique or other memorable aspect or moment)

(Four-way Tie):

Django Unchained – The bag head bag/mask problems scene

Hitchcock – Anthony Hopkins in lobby conducting to music/audience’s reaction during Psycho screening

The Impossible – Opening tsunami scene

The Master – The first processing questioning scene between Philip Seymour Hoffman and Joaquin Phoenix

 

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“There are critics who see their job as to be on the side of the artist, or in a state of imaginative sympathy or alliance with the artist. I think it’s important for a critic to be populist in the sense that we’re on the side of the public. I think one of the reasons is, frankly, capitalism. Whether you’re talking about restaurants or you’re talking about movies, you’re talking about large-scale commercial enterprises that are trying to sell themselves and market themselves and publicize themselves. A critic is, in a way, offering consumer advice. I think it’s very, very important in a time where everything is commercialized, commodified, and branded, where advertising is constantly bleeding into other forms of discourse, for there to be an independent voice kind of speaking to—and to some extent on behalf of—the public.”
~ A. O. Scott On One Role Of The Critic

“Every night, we’d sit and talk for a long, long time and talk about the process and I knew he was very, very intrigued about what could be happening. Then of course, one of the fascinating things he told me about was how he had readers who were reading for him that never knew it was Stanley Kubrick. So if he heard of a novel, he would send it out to people. I think he did it through newspaper ads at the time. And he would send it out to people and ask for a kind of synopsis or a critique of the novel. And he would read those. And it was done anonymously. But he said there were housewives and there were barristers and all sorts of people doing that. And I thought, yeah, that’s a really good way to open up the possibilities. Because otherwise, you’re randomly looking, walking through a bookstore or an airport. I said, “How many people are doing this?” It was about 30 people.”
~ George Miller’s Conversations With Kubrick