2012 Critics Awards: St. Louis Film Critics

2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013

Best Film:         Argo

Best Director:         Ben Affleck (Argo)

Best Actor:         Daniel Day-Lewis (Lincoln)

Best Actress:         Jessica Chastain (Zero Dark Thirty)

Best Supporting Actor:         Christoph Waltz (Django Unchained)

Best Supporting Actress:         (Tie): Ann Dowd (Compliance)  and Helen Hunt (The Sessions)

Best Original Screenplay:         Zero Dark Thirty (Mark Boal)

Best Adapted Screenplay:         (Tie): Lincoln (Tony Kushner)  and Silver Linings Playbook (David O. Russell)

Best Cinematography:         Skyfall (Roger Deakins)

Best Visual Effects:         Life of Pi

Best Music:         (Tie): Django Unchained and Moonrise Kingdom

Best Foreign-Language Film:         The Intouchables

Best Documentary:         Searching for Sugar Man

Best Comedy:         (Tie): Moonrise Kingdom and Ted

Best Animated Film:         Wreck-It Ralph

 

Special Merit (for best scene, cinematic technique or other memorable aspect or moment)

(Four-way Tie):

Django Unchained – The bag head bag/mask problems scene

Hitchcock – Anthony Hopkins in lobby conducting to music/audience’s reaction during Psycho screening

The Impossible – Opening tsunami scene

The Master – The first processing questioning scene between Philip Seymour Hoffman and Joaquin Phoenix

 

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“I am just grateful I am still around. I would love to be Steven Soderbergh, but I am lucky to be Joe Swanberg. Actors want to work with me, people want to give me money, and my nightmare scenario remains: Getting in bed with a studio, spending years on a movie, and it turns out horrible, but now I’m rich.”

Actually, by Hollywood standards, you’re right, I said. That is unambitious.

“It is, and yet, if you can go to bed happy at night, doing what you want, isn’t that ambition for a lifetime?”
~ Swanberg On Swanberg By Borelli

“In retrospect, nothing of that kind surprised me about Philip, because his intuition was luminous from the instant you met him. So was his intelligence. A lot of actors act intelligent, but Philip was the real thing: a shining, artistic polymath with an intelligence that came at you like a pair of headlights and enveloped you from the moment he grabbed your hand, put a huge arm round your neck and shoved a cheek against yours; or if the mood took him, hugged you to him like a big, pudgy schoolboy, then stood and beamed at you while he took stock of the effect.”
John le Carré on Philip Seymour Hoffman