2012 Critics Awards: San Francisco Film Critics

2003 | 2004 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013

Best Picture: The Master

Best Director: Kathryn Bigelow

Best Documentary: The Waiting Room

Best Foreign Language Film: Amour

Best Animated Film: ParaNorman

Best Editing: William Goldenberg, Argo

Best Production Design: Adam Stockhausen, Moonrise Kingdom

Best Cinematography: Claudio Miranda, Life of Pi

Best Adapted Screenplay: Tony Kushner, Lincoln

Best Original Screenplay: Mark Boal, Zero Dark Thirty

Best Supporting Actress: Helen Hunt, The Sessions

Best Supporting Actor: Tommy Lee Jones, Lincoln

Best Actress: Emmanuelle Riva, Amour

Best Actor: Joaquin Phoenix, The Master

Special Citation: Girl Walk//All Day by Jacob Krupnick

Marlon Riggs Award: Peter Nicks for The Waiting Room

3 Responses to “2012 Critics Awards: San Francisco Film Critics”

  1. YancySkancy says:

    Marabou?

  2. YancySkancy says:

    Oh, and I think the link said THE MASTER was their Best Pic choice.

  3. Ray Pride says:

    Actually, the page was wrong. THE MASTER is correct. Fixed, thanks. [RP]

Quote Unquotesee all »

What’s up with your people mover shot, where it seems like people are kind of floating along?
Oh, my signature shot? That’s just a new way for people to move! It’s really become my Alfred Hitchcock cameo. I did not invent that shot, but Ernest and I did it on the set of Mo Better Blues, when Shorty had to walk [through the park], and I thought, “Let’s try it.” But after that, we tried to have a reason for it. For example, that wonderful sequence in Malcolm X where you hear the great song, “A Change Is Gonna Come.” The final scene is like that, Malcolm floating along to his destiny. In 25th Hour, after Philip Seymour Hoffman has kissed Anna Paquin, we did a shot like that, and it shows his state of mind. In Inside Man, after Denzel thinks he’s witnessed the murder of a hostage, we did the floating shot there.

So you just like the way it looks?
Yeah!
~ Spike Lee To Matt Zoller Seitz

“I never accepted the term contrarian. I think that’s offensive, frankly. And my response to that is: if I’m a contrarian, what are other reviewers? What I strive to do is be a good critic, not somebody who simply accepts the product put in front of me. I guess it scares people to think that they don’t have any originality; that they don’t have the capacity to think for themselves.

“There’s a line a lot of reviewers use that I don’t like at all. They say ‘accept the film on its own terms.’ What that really means is, ‘accept the film as it is advertised.’ That’s got nothing to do with criticism. Nothing to do with having a response as a film watcher. A thinking person has to analyze what’s on screen, not simply rubber-stamp it or kowtow to marketing.”m

“To me, everything does have a political component and I think it’s an interesting way to look at art. It’s one way that makes film reviewing, I think, a politically relevant form of journalism. We do live in a political world, and we bring our political sense to the movies with us – unless you’re the kind of person who goes to the movies and shuts off the outside world. I’m not that kind of person.”
~ Armond White to Luke Buckmaster