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2012 Critics Awards: San Francisco Film Critics

2003 | 2004 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013

Best Picture: The Master

Best Director: Kathryn Bigelow

Best Documentary: The Waiting Room

Best Foreign Language Film: Amour

Best Animated Film: ParaNorman

Best Editing: William Goldenberg, Argo

Best Production Design: Adam Stockhausen, Moonrise Kingdom

Best Cinematography: Claudio Miranda, Life of Pi

Best Adapted Screenplay: Tony Kushner, Lincoln

Best Original Screenplay: Mark Boal, Zero Dark Thirty

Best Supporting Actress: Helen Hunt, The Sessions

Best Supporting Actor: Tommy Lee Jones, Lincoln

Best Actress: Emmanuelle Riva, Amour

Best Actor: Joaquin Phoenix, The Master

Special Citation: Girl Walk//All Day by Jacob Krupnick

Marlon Riggs Award: Peter Nicks for The Waiting Room

3 Responses to “2012 Critics Awards: San Francisco Film Critics”

  1. YancySkancy says:

    Marabou?

  2. YancySkancy says:

    Oh, and I think the link said THE MASTER was their Best Pic choice.

  3. Ray Pride says:

    Actually, the page was wrong. THE MASTER is correct. Fixed, thanks. [RP]

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DENNIS COOPER

The next thing that really changed my world and thoroughly influenced my writing were the films of Robert Bresson. When I discovered them in the late seventies, I felt I had found the final ingredient I needed to write the fiction I wanted to write.

INTERVIEWER

What was the final ingredient?

DENNIS COOPER

Recognizing that the films were entirely about emotion and, to me, ­ profoundly moving while, at the same time, stylistically inexpressive and monotonic. On the surface, they were nothing but style, and the style was extremely rigorous to boot, but they seemed almost transparent and purely content driven. Bresson’s use of untrained nonactors influenced my concentration on characters who are amateurs or noncharacters or characters who are ill equipped to handle the job of manning a story line or holding the reader’s attention in a conventional way. Altogether, I think Bresson’s films had the greatest influence on my work of any art I’ve ever encountered. In fact, the first fiction of mine that was ever published was a chapbook called “Antoine Monnier,” which was a god-awful, incompetent attempt to rewrite Bresson’s film Le diable ­probablement as a pornographic novella. So I came to writing novels through a channel that included experimental fiction, poetry, and nonliterary influences pretty much exclusively. I never read normal novels with any real interest or close attention.
~ Dennis Cooper Discovers Bresson

The whole world within reach.
~ Filmmaker Peter Hutton

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