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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

My new nickname…

What with The Prize Fighter and The Carpetbagger and the Aging Sphincter, I decided it was time for my own nickname.

I couldn’t think of anything self-aggrandizing enough to really, really piss other people who write about Oscar season until young Glenn Kenny made an off-handed comment on Twitter and… KISMET!

I had to reject the initial design because it was even to over the top for me to think it was funny…

And now the branding begins. We’re going to put this up on every gas station, residence, warehouse, farmhouse, henhouse, outhouse and doghouse in the awards voting area. We will budget it as a DVD marketing spend, but it will really be about winning the hearts and minds of, well, every human being on earth.

5 Responses to “My new nickname…”

  1. Js Partisan says:

    Would it be wrong of us to spend this entire thread giving you different nicknames? How about Schumacher?

  2. YancySkancy says:

    I’d have gone with The PrognOSCARcator.

  3. Js Partisan says:

    Oh, that’s a good one.

  4. Chris says:

    The Fugitive!

    I win.

  5. KrazyEyes says:

    How about The Phantom?

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