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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

My new nickname…

What with The Prize Fighter and The Carpetbagger and the Aging Sphincter, I decided it was time for my own nickname.

I couldn’t think of anything self-aggrandizing enough to really, really piss other people who write about Oscar season until young Glenn Kenny made an off-handed comment on Twitter and… KISMET!

I had to reject the initial design because it was even to over the top for me to think it was funny…

And now the branding begins. We’re going to put this up on every gas station, residence, warehouse, farmhouse, henhouse, outhouse and doghouse in the awards voting area. We will budget it as a DVD marketing spend, but it will really be about winning the hearts and minds of, well, every human being on earth.

5 Responses to “My new nickname…”

  1. Js Partisan says:

    Would it be wrong of us to spend this entire thread giving you different nicknames? How about Schumacher?

  2. YancySkancy says:

    I’d have gone with The PrognOSCARcator.

  3. Js Partisan says:

    Oh, that’s a good one.

  4. Chris says:

    The Fugitive!

    I win.

  5. KrazyEyes says:

    How about The Phantom?

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DENNIS COOPER

The next thing that really changed my world and thoroughly influenced my writing were the films of Robert Bresson. When I discovered them in the late seventies, I felt I had found the final ingredient I needed to write the fiction I wanted to write.

INTERVIEWER

What was the final ingredient?

DENNIS COOPER

Recognizing that the films were entirely about emotion and, to me, ­ profoundly moving while, at the same time, stylistically inexpressive and monotonic. On the surface, they were nothing but style, and the style was extremely rigorous to boot, but they seemed almost transparent and purely content driven. Bresson’s use of untrained nonactors influenced my concentration on characters who are amateurs or noncharacters or characters who are ill equipped to handle the job of manning a story line or holding the reader’s attention in a conventional way. Altogether, I think Bresson’s films had the greatest influence on my work of any art I’ve ever encountered. In fact, the first fiction of mine that was ever published was a chapbook called “Antoine Monnier,” which was a god-awful, incompetent attempt to rewrite Bresson’s film Le diable ­probablement as a pornographic novella. So I came to writing novels through a channel that included experimental fiction, poetry, and nonliterary influences pretty much exclusively. I never read normal novels with any real interest or close attention.
~ Dennis Cooper Discovers Bresson

The whole world within reach.
~ Filmmaker Peter Hutton

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