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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30: Zero Dark Thirty, actor Jessica Chastain

3 Responses to “DP/30: Zero Dark Thirty, actor Jessica Chastain”

  1. Sam says:

    Loved this interview. Jessica Chastain is a great conversationalist, and I like what she has to say about how she works. And I like how down to earth she is, despite having every reason not to be.

  2. jon says:

    She’s great.

  3. Djiggs says:

    The best Actress Oscar goes to Jessica Chastain this year & I think handily over Jennifer Lawrence.
    -the other 3 likely candidates Cotilliard, Riva, Weisz/Knightley are into pictures that are even more uncompromising in their artistic viewpoints than even ZD30 (not necessarily more successful story wise than ZD30 but definitely less appealing to an average moviegoer & academy member)
    -historical drama against screwball romantic comedy
    -sending praise to Obama’s administration approach to handling terrorists (e.g. Good detective work vs evil Cheney torture tactics)
    -Factoring along with their performances are Chastain’s career & Lawrence’s career in Oscar voters … Which I theorize will be like how the AL MVP went to Cabrera over Trout…Lawrence is still a young skyrocket with bigger mountains to climb while Chastain is hitting the beginning of her prime acting years after 10 plus years not having any substantial recognition until past two years
    -the biggest factors are screen time & how much each actor is carrying their film’s narrative; Lawrence is in a more defined ensemble movie & is not the character that is the audience’s narrative marker…Bradley Cooper is & Lawrence is the most important supporting but still a supporting player. Chastain’s Maya is the viewer ‘s prism into the world of ZD30. I think that this is the primary reason Streep was chosen over Davis…because she was in almost every single scene in her movie.

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