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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30: Zero Dark Thirty, actor Jessica Chastain

3 Responses to “DP/30: Zero Dark Thirty, actor Jessica Chastain”

  1. Sam says:

    Loved this interview. Jessica Chastain is a great conversationalist, and I like what she has to say about how she works. And I like how down to earth she is, despite having every reason not to be.

  2. jon says:

    She’s great.

  3. Djiggs says:

    The best Actress Oscar goes to Jessica Chastain this year & I think handily over Jennifer Lawrence.
    -the other 3 likely candidates Cotilliard, Riva, Weisz/Knightley are into pictures that are even more uncompromising in their artistic viewpoints than even ZD30 (not necessarily more successful story wise than ZD30 but definitely less appealing to an average moviegoer & academy member)
    -historical drama against screwball romantic comedy
    -sending praise to Obama’s administration approach to handling terrorists (e.g. Good detective work vs evil Cheney torture tactics)
    -Factoring along with their performances are Chastain’s career & Lawrence’s career in Oscar voters … Which I theorize will be like how the AL MVP went to Cabrera over Trout…Lawrence is still a young skyrocket with bigger mountains to climb while Chastain is hitting the beginning of her prime acting years after 10 plus years not having any substantial recognition until past two years
    -the biggest factors are screen time & how much each actor is carrying their film’s narrative; Lawrence is in a more defined ensemble movie & is not the character that is the audience’s narrative marker…Bradley Cooper is & Lawrence is the most important supporting but still a supporting player. Chastain’s Maya is the viewer ‘s prism into the world of ZD30. I think that this is the primary reason Streep was chosen over Davis…because she was in almost every single scene in her movie.

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DENNIS COOPER

The next thing that really changed my world and thoroughly influenced my writing were the films of Robert Bresson. When I discovered them in the late seventies, I felt I had found the final ingredient I needed to write the fiction I wanted to write.

INTERVIEWER

What was the final ingredient?

DENNIS COOPER

Recognizing that the films were entirely about emotion and, to me, ­ profoundly moving while, at the same time, stylistically inexpressive and monotonic. On the surface, they were nothing but style, and the style was extremely rigorous to boot, but they seemed almost transparent and purely content driven. Bresson’s use of untrained nonactors influenced my concentration on characters who are amateurs or noncharacters or characters who are ill equipped to handle the job of manning a story line or holding the reader’s attention in a conventional way. Altogether, I think Bresson’s films had the greatest influence on my work of any art I’ve ever encountered. In fact, the first fiction of mine that was ever published was a chapbook called “Antoine Monnier,” which was a god-awful, incompetent attempt to rewrite Bresson’s film Le diable ­probablement as a pornographic novella. So I came to writing novels through a channel that included experimental fiction, poetry, and nonliterary influences pretty much exclusively. I never read normal novels with any real interest or close attention.
~ Dennis Cooper Discovers Bresson

The whole world within reach.
~ Filmmaker Peter Hutton

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