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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30: Zero Dark Thirty, actor Jessica Chastain

3 Responses to “DP/30: Zero Dark Thirty, actor Jessica Chastain”

  1. Sam says:

    Loved this interview. Jessica Chastain is a great conversationalist, and I like what she has to say about how she works. And I like how down to earth she is, despite having every reason not to be.

  2. jon says:

    She’s great.

  3. Djiggs says:

    The best Actress Oscar goes to Jessica Chastain this year & I think handily over Jennifer Lawrence.
    -the other 3 likely candidates Cotilliard, Riva, Weisz/Knightley are into pictures that are even more uncompromising in their artistic viewpoints than even ZD30 (not necessarily more successful story wise than ZD30 but definitely less appealing to an average moviegoer & academy member)
    -historical drama against screwball romantic comedy
    -sending praise to Obama’s administration approach to handling terrorists (e.g. Good detective work vs evil Cheney torture tactics)
    -Factoring along with their performances are Chastain’s career & Lawrence’s career in Oscar voters … Which I theorize will be like how the AL MVP went to Cabrera over Trout…Lawrence is still a young skyrocket with bigger mountains to climb while Chastain is hitting the beginning of her prime acting years after 10 plus years not having any substantial recognition until past two years
    -the biggest factors are screen time & how much each actor is carrying their film’s narrative; Lawrence is in a more defined ensemble movie & is not the character that is the audience’s narrative marker…Bradley Cooper is & Lawrence is the most important supporting but still a supporting player. Chastain’s Maya is the viewer ‘s prism into the world of ZD30. I think that this is the primary reason Streep was chosen over Davis…because she was in almost every single scene in her movie.

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“The evening’s curious vanity and irrelevance stay with me, if only because those qualities characterize so many of Hollywood’s best intentions. Social problems present themselves to many of these people in terms of a scenario, in which, once certain key scenes are licked (the confrontation on the courthouse steps, the revelation that the opposition leader has an anti-Semitic past, the presentation of the bill of participants to the President, a Henry Fonda cameo), the plot will proceed inexorably to an upbeat fade. Marlon Brando does not, in a well-plotted motion picture, picket San Quentin in vain: what we are talking about here is faith in a dramatic convention. Things “happen” in motion pictures. There is always a resolution, always a strong cause-effect dramatic line, and to perceive the world in those terms is to assume an ending for every social scenario… If the poor people march on Washington and camp out, there to receive bundles of clothes gathered on the Fox lot by Barbra Streisand, then some good must come of it (the script here has a great many dramatic staples, not the least of them in a sentimental notion of Washington as an open forum, cf. Mr. Deeds Goes to Washington), and doubts have no place in the story.”
~ Joan Didion On Hw’d In 1970

CAMPION: We were driving around the countryside the other day, and we happened to chance upon a lone bull and cow going through some sex rituals. I was so surprised to see how lengthy the whole process was for this bull. He started licking the cow’s shin and worked his way quite laboriously up toward her ass. And every now and again, you thought, “Maybe she’s ready now—he’ll try a quick move.”
TAYLOR-JOHNSON: She wasn’t ready.
CAMPION: She made it clear that that wasn’t the case. We couldn’t even wait; it was like 15 minutes, but it was really adorable. Even when we came back, they were still at it. The foreplay was phenomenal.
TAYLOR-JOHNSON: You don’t think of animal love in that way.
~ Jane Campion And Sam Taylor-Johnson in Interview

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