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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30: Promised Land, co-writer/actor John Krasinski

3 Responses to “DP/30: Promised Land, co-writer/actor John Krasinski”

  1. Pete B. says:

    This lucky bastard is married to Emily Blunt. ARGH!

  2. Rob says:

    Terrific interview. David, you nailed why his Office performance has been oddly underrated. Hope he gets better opportunities than he’s had in movies thus far.

  3. Don R. Lewis says:

    I didn’t watch this interview yet but…I wanna say….

    THE PROMISED LAND is fucking fantastic. I’m so happy to have seen it and I’ve watched it twice. It’s absolutely NOT what anyone thinks it is (unless you know what it is from reading the Eggers story) and also, it’s simply NOT going to get noticed in this awards season. It’s a dead film walking, which, is unfortunate but also, who cares? This movie has much more going for it than awards bait.

    A movie as good as this deserves better than to be rolled by this field of nominees that are already decided. PROMISED LAND is not among them. That’s a fact. I wish Focus Features would ever so quietly back away from releasing it, sit back and wait till after the Oscars/the spring and let it live. It will find an audience.

    This movie is fucking great. Dropping it in theaters now will be a huge waste and relegate it to DVD/home viewing and thus take away from it’s impact. I don’t even know if a studio can like….quietly walk out right now but if they can, I wish it would sneak away and come back in the spring so it can be seen. So, so good.

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“One of my favorite things in watching any performance on film is when there isn’t a lot of cutting going on and when you get a chance to become really absorbed in the artist in hand. The same way we do, hopefully, at a concert, when we get a chance to really trip in to something that’s happening on stage. Whether the singer’s singing, or one of the other musicians is playing, we sort of stay there instead of cutting round with our eyes a lot.”
~ Jonathan Demme

“We’ve talked about this before in the past, my obsession with the Shakespearean histories having the ideal combination of the sweet and the sour. In ‘Henry IV, Part II’ which we’ve discussed before, in the end of that story it’s very complex and haunting because Prince Hal becomes Henry the King, and he has transcended his hoodlum days and at the ceremony is Falstaff, his good friend with whom he has really fucked around and been a loser with, and Falstaff comes up to him and says, ‘Now that you’re king we can really party,’ and the king famously says, ‘I know thee not, old man.’ It becomes Henry IV’s anointment and Falstaff’s catastrophe. That’s life. I have experienced very little unfettered triumph. There are moments, such as when my children are born, but even that comes with new fears and anxieties. In a sense the better you can communicate that life is both at once, the more powerful over time something becomes. One strives for something where the threads are there because it lasts in way that is very palpable. The idea of a tragedy is powerful in literature and theater, but in cinema it doesn’t work, certainly not commercially, and less so critically. Why is that? I think it has to do with how movies are so close to us.”
~ James Gray