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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30: Promised Land, co-writer/actor John Krasinski

3 Responses to “DP/30: Promised Land, co-writer/actor John Krasinski”

  1. Pete B. says:

    This lucky bastard is married to Emily Blunt. ARGH!

  2. Rob says:

    Terrific interview. David, you nailed why his Office performance has been oddly underrated. Hope he gets better opportunities than he’s had in movies thus far.

  3. Don R. Lewis says:

    I didn’t watch this interview yet but…I wanna say….

    THE PROMISED LAND is fucking fantastic. I’m so happy to have seen it and I’ve watched it twice. It’s absolutely NOT what anyone thinks it is (unless you know what it is from reading the Eggers story) and also, it’s simply NOT going to get noticed in this awards season. It’s a dead film walking, which, is unfortunate but also, who cares? This movie has much more going for it than awards bait.

    A movie as good as this deserves better than to be rolled by this field of nominees that are already decided. PROMISED LAND is not among them. That’s a fact. I wish Focus Features would ever so quietly back away from releasing it, sit back and wait till after the Oscars/the spring and let it live. It will find an audience.

    This movie is fucking great. Dropping it in theaters now will be a huge waste and relegate it to DVD/home viewing and thus take away from it’s impact. I don’t even know if a studio can like….quietly walk out right now but if they can, I wish it would sneak away and come back in the spring so it can be seen. So, so good.

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“You can’t make films about something the audience knows nothing about. The trick is getting the audience to tell their own stories in the story so that they know what will happen. And then, just before they get bored, you must surprise them and move the story in a new direction.”
~ Mogens Rukov

“In some parts of the world, for instance among intellectuals in Italy, you do still feel the need to defend entertainment – where there is still a commitment to a certain traditional left realist project, or the ideas of Brecht or Godard and so on. But in Great Britain and North America and many parts of Europe, no, I don’t think there is a need. The question is: is there such a thing as entertainment anymore? That’s what I am not sure about. Entertainment is very much posited upon an idea of escape. When I started thinking about entertainment people would say things like ‘It takes you out of yourself’, or ‘It takes your mind off things’. And of course people still have problems, but there was very much the sense then that most of life was hard but you had entertainment to take you away from it for a bit. While now, because of all sorts of changes, you can listen to music anywhere you go all the time – and even choose the music, not just accept the music that is there. That sense of a gap between a bad life and something to escape into has disappeared or is greatly diminished. I don’t know whether that is a good or a bad thing but it changes the nature of entertainment. In that sense I would no longer know what I would then be defending. That despising of the popular, that despising of what is enjoyable, may still be there, but it is not a discourse that has so much weight anymore.”
~ Critic-Academic Richard Dyer On “Entertainment”

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