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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30: Promised Land, co-writer/actor John Krasinski

3 Responses to “DP/30: Promised Land, co-writer/actor John Krasinski”

  1. Pete B. says:

    This lucky bastard is married to Emily Blunt. ARGH!

  2. Rob says:

    Terrific interview. David, you nailed why his Office performance has been oddly underrated. Hope he gets better opportunities than he’s had in movies thus far.

  3. Don R. Lewis says:

    I didn’t watch this interview yet but…I wanna say….

    THE PROMISED LAND is fucking fantastic. I’m so happy to have seen it and I’ve watched it twice. It’s absolutely NOT what anyone thinks it is (unless you know what it is from reading the Eggers story) and also, it’s simply NOT going to get noticed in this awards season. It’s a dead film walking, which, is unfortunate but also, who cares? This movie has much more going for it than awards bait.

    A movie as good as this deserves better than to be rolled by this field of nominees that are already decided. PROMISED LAND is not among them. That’s a fact. I wish Focus Features would ever so quietly back away from releasing it, sit back and wait till after the Oscars/the spring and let it live. It will find an audience.

    This movie is fucking great. Dropping it in theaters now will be a huge waste and relegate it to DVD/home viewing and thus take away from it’s impact. I don’t even know if a studio can like….quietly walk out right now but if they can, I wish it would sneak away and come back in the spring so it can be seen. So, so good.

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