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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30: Promised Land, co-writer/actor John Krasinski

3 Responses to “DP/30: Promised Land, co-writer/actor John Krasinski”

  1. Pete B. says:

    This lucky bastard is married to Emily Blunt. ARGH!

  2. Rob says:

    Terrific interview. David, you nailed why his Office performance has been oddly underrated. Hope he gets better opportunities than he’s had in movies thus far.

  3. Don R. Lewis says:

    I didn’t watch this interview yet but…I wanna say….

    THE PROMISED LAND is fucking fantastic. I’m so happy to have seen it and I’ve watched it twice. It’s absolutely NOT what anyone thinks it is (unless you know what it is from reading the Eggers story) and also, it’s simply NOT going to get noticed in this awards season. It’s a dead film walking, which, is unfortunate but also, who cares? This movie has much more going for it than awards bait.

    A movie as good as this deserves better than to be rolled by this field of nominees that are already decided. PROMISED LAND is not among them. That’s a fact. I wish Focus Features would ever so quietly back away from releasing it, sit back and wait till after the Oscars/the spring and let it live. It will find an audience.

    This movie is fucking great. Dropping it in theaters now will be a huge waste and relegate it to DVD/home viewing and thus take away from it’s impact. I don’t even know if a studio can like….quietly walk out right now but if they can, I wish it would sneak away and come back in the spring so it can be seen. So, so good.

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“There are critics who see their job as to be on the side of the artist, or in a state of imaginative sympathy or alliance with the artist. I think it’s important for a critic to be populist in the sense that we’re on the side of the public. I think one of the reasons is, frankly, capitalism. Whether you’re talking about restaurants or you’re talking about movies, you’re talking about large-scale commercial enterprises that are trying to sell themselves and market themselves and publicize themselves. A critic is, in a way, offering consumer advice. I think it’s very, very important in a time where everything is commercialized, commodified, and branded, where advertising is constantly bleeding into other forms of discourse, for there to be an independent voice kind of speaking to—and to some extent on behalf of—the public.”
~ A. O. Scott On One Role Of The Critic

“Every night, we’d sit and talk for a long, long time and talk about the process and I knew he was very, very intrigued about what could be happening. Then of course, one of the fascinating things he told me about was how he had readers who were reading for him that never knew it was Stanley Kubrick. So if he heard of a novel, he would send it out to people. I think he did it through newspaper ads at the time. And he would send it out to people and ask for a kind of synopsis or a critique of the novel. And he would read those. And it was done anonymously. But he said there were housewives and there were barristers and all sorts of people doing that. And I thought, yeah, that’s a really good way to open up the possibilities. Because otherwise, you’re randomly looking, walking through a bookstore or an airport. I said, “How many people are doing this?” It was about 30 people.”
~ George Miller’s Conversations With Kubrick