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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

DP/30: Django Unchained, re-recording mixers Mike Minkler & Tony Lamberti and production sound mixer Mark Ulano

If you want perspective on how Tarantino works, these guys offer a lot, above and beyond their own work on this and other QT films.

3 Responses to “DP/30: Django Unchained, re-recording mixers Mike Minkler & Tony Lamberti and production sound mixer Mark Ulano”

  1. Not David Bordwell says:

    To hell with the digital age, can you image these guys working for George Stevens?

    Also interesting to hear Samuel L. Jackson saying the same exact thing about directors who film for coverage because they can’t make a choice to serve their own vision. Reminds me of ALL THAT JAZZ, where Joe Gideon can’t stop editing his Lenny Bruce routines and keeps kicking himself that he didn’t have tighter rein on his actor.

    OTOH, isn’t that how Hal Ashby worked?

  2. PastePotPete says:

    Different directors have different philosophies. Look at Kubrick. He shot tons of footage to have editing choices. He thought the real art was in the editing.

    Poland, btw, I’m not sure how popular this segment has been but I enjoyed it a great deal. Thank you for posting it, I’d enjoy seeing more below the line people on these DP30s.

  3. John McCain says:

    ‘Different directors have different philosophies. Look at Kubrick. He shot tons of footage to have editing choices. He thought the real art was in the editing.’

    That’s editing. Not directing.

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