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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30: Django Unchained, re-recording mixers Mike Minkler & Tony Lamberti and production sound mixer Mark Ulano

If you want perspective on how Tarantino works, these guys offer a lot, above and beyond their own work on this and other QT films.

3 Responses to “DP/30: Django Unchained, re-recording mixers Mike Minkler & Tony Lamberti and production sound mixer Mark Ulano”

  1. Not David Bordwell says:

    To hell with the digital age, can you image these guys working for George Stevens?

    Also interesting to hear Samuel L. Jackson saying the same exact thing about directors who film for coverage because they can’t make a choice to serve their own vision. Reminds me of ALL THAT JAZZ, where Joe Gideon can’t stop editing his Lenny Bruce routines and keeps kicking himself that he didn’t have tighter rein on his actor.

    OTOH, isn’t that how Hal Ashby worked?

  2. PastePotPete says:

    Different directors have different philosophies. Look at Kubrick. He shot tons of footage to have editing choices. He thought the real art was in the editing.

    Poland, btw, I’m not sure how popular this segment has been but I enjoyed it a great deal. Thank you for posting it, I’d enjoy seeing more below the line people on these DP30s.

  3. John McCain says:

    ‘Different directors have different philosophies. Look at Kubrick. He shot tons of footage to have editing choices. He thought the real art was in the editing.’

    That’s editing. Not directing.

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“I wondered how different it would be to write a novel and it’s totally different. It’s very internal. The weird thing about it is that I found that novel-writing was much more like directing than it is like screenwriting. You’re casting it, you’re lighting it, you’re doing the costumes, you’re doing the locations, you’re doing it all yourself as a director would. In screenwriting, you don’t do that stuff. You don’t describe the face of the actor or the character when you’re writing a screenplay because Tom Cruise is going to do it and he doesn’t look like that, whereas in the novel to describe what he is is what he is. The actual act of writing, just like shooting on a set, is a slow slog. It’s going to work every day.”
~ David Cronenberg On Screenplay vs. Novel

“I was fortunate to be in the two big film epics of the last part of the 20th century: Godfather and “Lonesome Dove” on television, which was my favorite part. That’s my “Hamlet.” The English have Shakespeare; the French, Molière. In Argentina, they have Borges, but the western is ours. I like that.”
~ Robert Duvall