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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30: Django Unchained, re-recording mixers Mike Minkler & Tony Lamberti and production sound mixer Mark Ulano

If you want perspective on how Tarantino works, these guys offer a lot, above and beyond their own work on this and other QT films.

3 Responses to “DP/30: Django Unchained, re-recording mixers Mike Minkler & Tony Lamberti and production sound mixer Mark Ulano”

  1. Not David Bordwell says:

    To hell with the digital age, can you image these guys working for George Stevens?

    Also interesting to hear Samuel L. Jackson saying the same exact thing about directors who film for coverage because they can’t make a choice to serve their own vision. Reminds me of ALL THAT JAZZ, where Joe Gideon can’t stop editing his Lenny Bruce routines and keeps kicking himself that he didn’t have tighter rein on his actor.

    OTOH, isn’t that how Hal Ashby worked?

  2. PastePotPete says:

    Different directors have different philosophies. Look at Kubrick. He shot tons of footage to have editing choices. He thought the real art was in the editing.

    Poland, btw, I’m not sure how popular this segment has been but I enjoyed it a great deal. Thank you for posting it, I’d enjoy seeing more below the line people on these DP30s.

  3. John McCain says:

    ‘Different directors have different philosophies. Look at Kubrick. He shot tons of footage to have editing choices. He thought the real art was in the editing.’

    That’s editing. Not directing.

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“In some parts of the world, for instance among intellectuals in Italy, you do still feel the need to defend entertainment – where there is still a commitment to a certain traditional left realist project, or the ideas of Brecht or Godard and so on. But in Great Britain and North America and many parts of Europe, no, I don’t think there is a need. The question is: is there such a thing as entertainment anymore? That’s what I am not sure about. Entertainment is very much posited upon an idea of escape. When I started thinking about entertainment people would say things like ‘It takes you out of yourself’, or ‘It takes your mind off things’. And of course people still have problems, but there was very much the sense then that most of life was hard but you had entertainment to take you away from it for a bit. While now, because of all sorts of changes, you can listen to music anywhere you go all the time – and even choose the music, not just accept the music that is there. That sense of a gap between a bad life and something to escape into has disappeared or is greatly diminished. I don’t know whether that is a good or a bad thing but it changes the nature of entertainment. In that sense I would no longer know what I would then be defending. That despising of the popular, that despising of what is enjoyable, may still be there, but it is not a discourse that has so much weight anymore.”
~ Critic-Academic Richard Dyer On “Entertainment”

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