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By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Dave Brubeck “Take Five,” Live, 1966 (5’22″)

4 Responses to “Dave Brubeck “Take Five,” Live, 1966 (5’22″)”

  1. Donny Vosburgh says:

    I met them all and studied with Joe Morello in the late 60′s. Dave and Joe and Paul and Eugene were great to be around. Once again I am saden at hearing of Dave’s Passing, A great man!

  2. wim rutten says:

    it is due to a friend drummer, a man I consider to be like a brother, that I learned more about Dave, and Joe Morello.
    Daves music is stained in my brain.
    A great musician.

  3. Sara says:

    My Dad was his greatest fan when I was a kid. I swear “Take Five” is etched in my brain, forever. Sad when they go, but this man left “forever” for us to enjoy in his music. Rest in Peace, Dave! And, thank you for sharing your great, great talent with the world!

  4. Ben says:

    Dave Brubeck another great talent lost in this world. Hope more people learn about him.

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A statement from David Chase’s representative, Leslee Dart:

A journalist for Vox misconstrued what David Chase said in their interview. To simply quote David as saying,“ Tony Soprano is not dead,” is inaccurate. There is a much larger context for that statement and as such, it is not true. As David Chase has said numerous times on the record, “Whether Tony Soprano is alive or dead is not the point.” To continue to search for this answer is fruitless. The final scene of THE SOPRANOS raises a spiritual question that has no right or wrong answer.
~ David Chase Refutes Vox Writer

“By the time the sounds of the Von Trapp children warbling ‘Silent Night’ drift through The Giver, you may find yourself wondering what fresh movie hell this is. In truth, the enervating hash of dystopian dread, vague religiosity and commercial advertising-style uplift is nothing if not stale. Adapted from Lois Lowry’s book for young readers, the story involves an isolated society that, with its cubistic dwellings, mindless smiles, monochromatic environs and nebulous communitarianism, seem modeled on a Scandinavian country or an old Mentos commercial.”
~ Manohla Dargis’ Deadly Lede For Review Of The Giver