Z

By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

33RD LONDON CRITICS’ CIRCLE FILM AWARDS NOMINATIONS

London – Tuesday 18 December 2012
The London Critics’ Circle is delighted to announce the nominations today for its 33rd Film Awards. Michael Haneke’s Amour and Paul Thomas Anderson’s The Master lead the nominations with seven apiece.

Amour received nods in categories including both Sky Movies Film of the Year and Foreign Language Film, the American Airlines Director and Screenwriter awards for Haneke, Actor for Jean-Louis Trintignant, Actress for Emmanuelle Riva and Supporting Actress for Isabelle Huppert.

The Master picked up nominations for Sky Movies Film, the American Airlines Director and Screenwriter awards for Anderson, Actor and Supporting Actor for Joaquin Phoenix and Philip Seymour Hoffman respectively and Supporting Actress for Amy Adams.

Having recently made box office history in the UK, Skyfall now becomes the most fêted Bond film at the Critics’ Circle Awards. It leads the British field with a stellar five nominations. These include The May Fair Hotel British Film award, British Actor of the Year for Daniel Craig and Judi Dench, who is nominated in two categories: Supporting Actress and British Actress of the Year, the latter of which is shared with her role in The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel.

Sightseers has been honoured with an impressive four nominations including The May Fair Hotel British Film, Breakthrough British Film-Maker for writers Alice Lowe and Steve Oram as well as British Actor and British Actress for Steve Oram and Alice Lowe respectively.

The British Actress award will also be contested by Helen Mirren, Emily Blunt and Andrea Riseborough as well as Judi Dench. Also nominated in the Actress category is Jessica Chastain, Marion Cotillard, Helen Hunt and Jennifer Lawrence whilst Daniel Day-Lewis and Mads Mikkelsen are included in the Spotlight award Actor category.

Also receiving four nominations apiece are Life of Pi and Argo, both nominated in the Sky Movies Film of the Year category, Lincoln and Les Miserables, which is included in The May Fair Hotel British Film category.

Documentary smash, The Imposter and Berberian Sound Studio are the other nominees in The May Fair Hotel British Film category, the former film also receiving nominations in two further categories. Also, battling it out for Sky Movies Film of the Year is Beasts of the Southern Wild.

The London Film Critics’ Circle comprises over 120 members of UK film critics, broadcasters and writers, who this year voted for more than 200 titles on their nominations ballots. The Circle’s Chairman, Jason Solomons commented:

“Once again, the selections of the British critics illustrate the great variation of extraordinary work in film over the last year.

In all categories, the films are of outstanding quality this year, indicating how the London critics view all films from around the world on a level footing – brilliance is the only benchmark. Choosing winners will be harder than ever, but never will they have been more deserving.

Such a perceptive and rigorous set of nominations ensures we’ll have another awards night of wonderful film talent where respect is afforded by all parties to make certain artistry and creativity continue to be valued and rewarded.

The many and varied characters played with such elan by our Dilys Powell recipient Helena Bonham Carter are also a perfect illustration of this, and stand as a perfect testament to what the London Film Critics’ Circle hopes to embody with its nominations.”

The 33rd annual edition London Critics’ Circle Film Awards will take place on Sunday 20th January. The awards ceremony has this year relocated to the May Fair Hotel, which is kindly supporting the event. This luxury 5 star hotel, located in the heart of London’s Mayfair, will provide a more glamorous, intimate location for the starry red carpet event. This year’s glittering ceremony will be held in aid of their charity partner Missing People, a 24/7 lifeline when someone disappears.

33rd LONDON CRITICS’ CIRCLE FILM AWARDS NOMINATIONS IN FULL

The Sky Movies Award: FILM OF THE YEAR
Amour (Artificial Eye)
Argo (Warners)
Beasts of the Southern Wild (StudioCanal)
Life of Pi (Fox)
The Master (Entertainment)

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM OF THE YEAR
Amour (Artificial Eye)
Holy Motors (Artificial Eye)
Once Upon a Time in Anatolia (New Wave)
Rust and Bone (StudioCanal)
Tabu (New Wave)

DOCUMENTARY OF THE YEAR
The Imposter (Picturehouse/Revolver)
London: The Modern Babylon (BFI)
Nostalgia for the Light (New Wave)
The Queen of Versailles (Dogwoof)
Searching for Sugar Man (StudioCanal)

The May Fair Hotel Award: BRITISH FILM OF THE YEAR
Berberian Sound Studio (Artificial Eye)
The Imposter (Picturehouse/Revolver)
Les Miserables (Universal)
Sightseers (StudioCanal)
Skyfall (Sony)

The Spotlight Award: ACTOR OF THE YEAR
Daniel Day-Lewis – Lincoln (Fox)
Hugh Jackman – Les Miserables (Universal)
Mads Mikkelsen – The Hunt (Arrow)
Joaquin Phoenix – The Master (Entertainment)
Jean-Louis Trintignant – Amour (Artificial Eye)

ACTRESS OF THE YEAR
Jessica Chastain – Zero Dark Thirty (Universal)
Marion Cotillard – Rust and Bone (StudioCanal)
Helen Hunt – The Sessions (Fox)
Jennifer Lawrence – Silver Linings Playbook (Entertainment)
Emmanuelle Riva – Amour (Artificial Eye)

SUPPORTING ACTOR OF THE YEAR
Alan Arkin – Argo (Warners)
Javier Bardem – Skyfall (Sony)
Michael Fassbender – Prometheus (Fox)
Philip Seymour Hoffman – The Master (Entertainment)
Tommy Lee Jones – Lincoln (Fox)

SUPPORTING ACTRESS OF THE YEAR
Amy Adams – The Master (Entertainment)
Judi Dench – Skyfall (Sony)
Sally Field – Lincoln (Fox)
Anne Hathaway – Les Miserables (Universal)
Isabelle Huppert – Amour (Artificial Eye)

BRITISH ACTOR OF THE YEAR – In association with Cameo Productions
Daniel Craig – Skyfall (Sony)
Charlie Creed-Miles – Wild Bill (The Works/Universal)
Daniel Day-Lewis – Lincoln (Fox)
Toby Jones – Berberian Sound Studio (Artificial Eye)
Steve Oram – Sightseers (StudioCanal)

BRITISH ACTRESS OF THE YEAR
Emily Blunt – Looper (eOne) and Your Sister’s Sister (StudioCanal)
Judi Dench – The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (Fox) and Skyfall (Sony)
Alice Lowe – Sightseers (StudioCanal)
Helen Mirren – Hitchcock (Fox)
Andrea Riseborough – Shadow Dancer (Paramount)

YOUNG BRITISH PERFORMER OF THE YEAR
Samantha Barks – Les Miserables (Universal)
Fady Elsayed – My Brother the Devil (Verve)
Tom Holland – The Impossible (eOne)
Will Poulter – Wild Bill (The Works/Universal)
Jack Reynor – What Richard Did (Artificial Eye)

The American Airlines Award: DIRECTOR OF THE YEAR
Paul Thomas Anderson – The Master (Entertainment)
Kathryn Bigelow – Zero Dark Thirty (Universal)
Nuri Bilge Ceylan – Once Upon a Time in Anatolia (New Wave)
Michael Haneke – Amour (Artificial Eye)
Ang Lee – Life of Pi (Fox)

SCREENWRITER OF THE YEAR
Paul Thomas Anderson – The Master (Entertainment)
Mark Boal – Zero Dark Thirty (Universal)
Michael Haneke – Amour (Artificial Eye)
Quentin Tarantino – Django Unchained (Sony)
Chris Terrio – Argo (Warners)

BREAKTHROUGH BRITISH FILM-MAKER
Ben Drew, writer/director – Ill Manors (Revolver)
Sally El Hosaini, writer/director – My Brother the Devil (Verve)
Dexter Fletcher, co-writer/director – Wild Bill (The Works/Universal)
Bart Layton, writer/director – The Imposter (Picturehouse/Revolver)
Alice Lowe & Steve Oram, writers – Sightseers (StudioCanal)

The Sky 3D Award: TECHNICAL ACHIEVEMENT AWARD
Anna Karenina – Jacqueline Durran, costumes (Universal)
Argo – William Goldenberg, film editing (Warners)
Beasts of the Southern Wild – Ben Richardson, cinematography (StudioCanal)
Berberian Sound Studio – Joakim Sundstrom & Stevie Haywood, sound design (Artificial Eye)
Holy Motors – Bernard Floch, makeup (Artificial Eye)
Life of Pi – Claudio Miranda, cinematography (Fox)
Life of Pi – Bill Westenhofer, visual effects (Fox)
The Master – Jack Fisk & David Crank, production design (Entertainment)
My Brother the Devil – David Raedeker, cinematography  (Verve)
Rust and Bone – Alexandre Desplat, music (StudioCanal)

DILYS POWELL AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN FILM: Sponsored by PREMIER
Helena Bonham Carter

Nb. Irish films, film-makers and performers are eligible in British categories.
About The Critics’ Circle
Established in 1913, The Critics’ Circle is the oldest organisation of its kind in the world, with more than 400 members who work in the UK media as critics of drama, art and architecture, music, film and dance. The Film Section has more than 120 voting members working as film critics, journalists and broadcasters, and has presented its awards annually since 1980. www.criticscircle.org.uk

About Missing People
An estimated 250,000 people go missing each year in the UK. The youngest of those can face physical and sexual abuse while 1 in 4 missing adults end up sleeping rough. Missing People has a team on hand 24 hours a day, providing a confidential free lifeline when someone disappears. The charity also coordinates a UK wide search network of volunteers, community and media partners. For every £1 donated the charity delivers £2 of value, enabling the safe reconnection of 1,051 missing people last year. www.missingpeople.org.uk.

Leave a Reply

Quote Unquotesee all »

Tsangari: With my next film, White Knuckles, it comes with a budget — it’s going to be a huge new world for me. As always when I enter into a new thing, don’t you wonder how it’s going to be and how much of yourself you are going to have to sacrifice? The ballet of all of this. I’m already imaging the choreography — not of the camera, but the choreography of actually bringing it to life. It is as fascinating as the shooting itself. I find the producing as exciting as the directing. The one informs the other. There is this producer-director hat that I constantly wear. I’ve been thinking about these early auteurs, like Howard Hawks and John Ford and Preston Sturges—all of these guys basically were hired by the studio, and I doubt they had final cut, and somehow they had films that now we can say they had their signatures.  There are different ways of being creative within the parameters and limitations of production. The only thing you cannot negotiate is stupidity.
Filmmaker: And unfortunately, there is an abundance of that in the world.
Tsangari: This is the only big risk: stupidity. Everything else is completely worked out in the end.
~ Chevalier‘s Rachel Athina Tsangari

“The middle-range movies that I was doing have largely either stopped being made, or they’ve moved to television, now that television is a go-to medium for directors who can’t get work in theatricals, because there are so few theatricals being made. But also with the new miniseries concept, you can tell a long story in detail without having to cram it all into 90 minutes. You don’t have to cut the characters and take out the secondary people. You can actually put them all on a big canvas. And it is a big canvas, because people have bigger screens now, so there’s no aesthetic difference between the way you shoot a movie and the way you shoot a TV show.

“Which is all for the good. But what’s happened in the interim is that theatrical movies being a spectacle business are now either giant blockbuster movies that run three hours—even superhero movies run three hours, they used to run like 58 minutes!—and the others, which are dysfunctional family independent movies or the slob comedy or the kiddie movie, and those are all low-budget. So the middle ground of movies that were about things, they’re just gone. Or else they’re on HBO. Like the Bryan Cranston LBJ movie, which years ago would’ve been made for theaters.

“You’ve got people like Paul Schrader and Walter Hill who can’t get their movies theatrically distributed because there’s no market for it. So they end up going to VOD, and VOD is a model from which no one makes any money, because most of the time, as soon as they get on the site, they’re pirated. So the whole model of the system right now is completely broken. And whether or not anybody’s going to try to fix, or if it even can be fixed, I don’t know. But it’s certainly not the same business that I got into in the ’70s.”
~ Joe Dante

Z Weekend Report