MCN Columnists
David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

20W2O: You’ve Been Globed

The Globes are a weird phenomenon.

All publicity is good publicity, right? And none of the smarminess of the HFPA directly rubs off on the nominees. Nor should it.

But… oy.

Is Christoph Waltz or Leonardo DiCaprio really giving a better acting performance in Django Unchained than DeNiro in Silver Linings Playbook? Oh the irony that chewing scenery is what DeNiro has been mocked for in recent years and now that he finds a real acting role again… f-off, pal. (And don’t even get me started on how much better Samuel L. Jackson is than anyone in that movie.)

And will people really remember either Django supporting role over Jason Clarke’s turn in Zero Dark Thirty? No. Both Waltz and DiCaprio have other stuff more interesting and more memorable. but Jason is “new” and is not yet getting Oscar buzz of real magnitude, so…

Any by the way… Django is a drama? Not a comedy?

And the notion that Musical/Comedy isn’t a ghetto… well, don’t tell David O. Russell or Tom Hooper this morning.

Personally? Thrilled for Rachel Weisz and Nicole Kidman, two actresses who committed completely to tough roles in small films and are getting some love for that. It’s HFPA, so I can’t say that it’s not because they are who they are. But love is love. And for films that small, the attention is really important.

And I feel bad for Emmanuelle Riva and Keira Knightley… who should not be anything close to written off at this point.

I’m happy for the people who got Salmon Fishing in the Yemen made, including Ewan McGregor, Emily Blunt, and Lasse Hallstrom, who I was with just yesterday. This is one of those cases where the HFPA liked the movie months ago and it just never got pushed out of the way. (Sad for This is 40… but box office may comfort the Apatows.) It’s a good get for the very busy Terry Press… but not shocking in Comedy/Musical.

Given where this season is… these nominations are pretty much a non-event. Really, the one thing that turned up here that could move the meter a touch when Oscar voting starts on Monday (and ends in 3 weeks and a day) is Rachel Weisz, who has now been honored here and by NYFCC. But the rest… not really anything outside of the curve as has been laid out for weeks and months.

[The nominations list is here.]

6 Responses to “20W2O: You’ve Been Globed”

  1. Keil S. says:

    Seems like a list of the noms or a link to them would make sense in this piece.

  2. Daniella Isaacs says:

    I, too, am glad to see Weisz getting more attention. I only saw DEEP BLUE SEA after the NYFC announcement–even though I’ve been a fan of Davies for years–but think she absolutely ranks very high this year.

  3. Walter says:

    SO glad to see the Django nods (especially DiCaprio), and also the nominations for Salmon Fishing… which I loved.

  4. “Is Christoph Waltz or Leonardo DiCaprio really giving a better acting performance in Django Unchained than DeNiro in Silver Linings Playbook?”

    Yes.

    “And will people really remember either Django supporting role over Jason Clarke’s turn in Zero Dark Thirty?”

    Love Jason though I do, absolutely.

  5. Alex says:

    I wonder if Kidman is set for another Oscar nomination now that she has SAG and GG nominations. Since she is in Supporting we don’t have to worry about comparing Drama/Musical&Comedy categories.

  6. Alex says:

    Now to answer my own question, the last supporting actresses who got SAG & GG nominations but weren’t nominated for Oscars were:

    – Mila Kunis (2010)
    – Maria Bello (2003)

    In light of this I think Kidman stands a very good chance of being nominated. She isn’t a newcomer like Mila Kunis (that year the category was also very crowded), nor is she an underrated and underused actress like Bello.

    Of course you can’t go on the basis of statistics alone, and I the 4th/5th slots are definitely a 3 way contest between Kidman/Smith/Adams, but with enough screeners, FYC ads and press, I think Kidman should be able to get over the line. She is definitely popular and the role of Charlotte Bless is sure to attract some attention.

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“When Bay keeps these absurd plot-gears spinning, he’s displaying his skill as a slick, professional entertainer. But then there are the images of motion—I hesitate to say, of things in motion, because it’s not clear how many things there are in the movie, instead of mere digital simulations of things. It doesn’t matter. What matters is that there’s a car chase through London, seen from the level of tires, that could have gone on for an hour, um, tirelessly. What matters is that the defenestrated Cade saves himself by leaping from drone to drone in midair like a frog skipping among lotus pads; that he and Vivian slide along the colossal, polished expanses of sharply tilting age-old fields of metal like luge Olympians. What matters is that, when this heroic duo find themselves thrust out into the void of inner space from a collapsing planet, it has a terrifyingly vast emptiness that Bay doesn’t dare hold for more than an instant lest he become the nightmare-master. What matters is that the enormous thing hurtling toward Earth is composed in a fanatical detail that would repay slow-motion viewing with near-geological patience. Bay has an authentic sense of the gigantic; beside the playful enormity of his Transformerized universe, the ostensibly heroic dimensions of Ridley Scott’s and Christopher Nolan’s massive visions seem like petulant vanities.”
~ Michael Bay Gives Richard Brody A Tingle

How do you see film evolving in this age of Netflix?

I thought the swing would be quicker and more violent. There have been two landmark moments in the history of French film. First in 1946, with the creation of the CNC under the aegis of Malraux. He saved French cinema by establishing the advance on receipts and support fund mechanisms. We’re all children of this political invention. Americans think that the State gives money to French films, but they’re wrong. Through this system, films fund themselves!

The other great turning point came by the hand of Jack Lang in the 1980s, after the creation of Canal+. While television was getting ready to become the nemesis of film, he created the decoder, and a specific broadcasting space between film and television, using new investments for film. That once again saved French film.

These political decisions are important. We’re once again facing big change. If our political masters don’t take control of the situation and new stakeholders like Netflix, Google and Amazon, we’re headed for disaster. We need to create obligations for Internet service providers. They can’t always be against film. They used to allow piracy, but now that they’ve become producers themselves, they’re starting to see things in a different light. This is a moment of transition, a strong political act needs to be put forward. And it can’t just be at national level, it has to happen at European level.

Filmmaker Cédric Klapisch