2013 Critics Awards: National Board Of Review

2003 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2011 | 2013 | 2014

 

Best Film: Zero Dark Thirty

Best Director: Kathryn Bigelow, Zero Dark Thirty

Best Actor: Bradley Cooper

Silver Linings Playbook

Best Actress: Jessica Chastain, Zero Dark Thirty

Best Supporting Actor: Leonardo DiCaprio, Django Unchained

Best Supporting Actress: Ann Dowd, Compliance

Best Original Screenplay: Rian Johnson ,Looper

Best Adapted Screenplay: David O. Russell, Silver Linings Playbook

Best Animated Feature: Wreck-It Ralph

Special Achievement in Filmmaking: Ben Affleck, Argo

Breakthrough Actor: Tom Holland, The Impossible

Breakthrough Actress: Quvenzhané Wallis, Beasts of the Southern Wild

Best Directorial Debut: Benh Zeitlin, Beasts of the Southern Wild

Best Foreign Language Film:  Amour

Best Documentary: Searching For Sugar Man

William K. Everson Film History Award: 50 Years of Bond Films

Best Ensemble: Les Misérables

Spotlight Award: John Goodman

NBR Freedom of Expression Award: Central Park Five

NBR Freedom of Expression Award: Promised Land

 

 

Top 10 films

Argo

Beasts of the Southern Wild

Django Unchained

Les Miserables

Lincoln

Looper

The Perks of Being a Wallflower

Promised Land

Silver Linings Playbook

 

Top 10 Independent Films

Arbitrage

Bernie

Compliance

End of Watch

Hello I Must Be Going

Little Birds

Moonrise Kingdom

On the Road

Quartet

Sleepwalk with Me

 

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“There are critics who see their job as to be on the side of the artist, or in a state of imaginative sympathy or alliance with the artist. I think it’s important for a critic to be populist in the sense that we’re on the side of the public. I think one of the reasons is, frankly, capitalism. Whether you’re talking about restaurants or you’re talking about movies, you’re talking about large-scale commercial enterprises that are trying to sell themselves and market themselves and publicize themselves. A critic is, in a way, offering consumer advice. I think it’s very, very important in a time where everything is commercialized, commodified, and branded, where advertising is constantly bleeding into other forms of discourse, for there to be an independent voice kind of speaking to—and to some extent on behalf of—the public.”
~ A. O. Scott On One Role Of The Critic

“Every night, we’d sit and talk for a long, long time and talk about the process and I knew he was very, very intrigued about what could be happening. Then of course, one of the fascinating things he told me about was how he had readers who were reading for him that never knew it was Stanley Kubrick. So if he heard of a novel, he would send it out to people. I think he did it through newspaper ads at the time. And he would send it out to people and ask for a kind of synopsis or a critique of the novel. And he would read those. And it was done anonymously. But he said there were housewives and there were barristers and all sorts of people doing that. And I thought, yeah, that’s a really good way to open up the possibilities. Because otherwise, you’re randomly looking, walking through a bookstore or an airport. I said, “How many people are doing this?” It was about 30 people.”
~ George Miller’s Conversations With Kubrick