By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

2013 National Board Of Review Awards

 

Best Film: Zero Dark Thirty

Best Director: Kathryn Bigelow, Zero Dark Thirty

Best Actor: Bradley Cooper

Silver Linings Playbook

Best Actress: Jessica Chastain, Zero Dark Thirty

Best Supporting Actor: Leonardo DiCaprio, Django Unchained

Best Supporting Actress: Ann Dowd, Compliance

Best Original Screenplay: Rian Johnson ,Looper

Best Adapted Screenplay: David O. Russell, Silver Linings Playbook

Best Animated Feature: Wreck-It Ralph

Special Achievement in Filmmaking: Ben Affleck, Argo

Breakthrough Actor: Tom Holland, The Impossible

Breakthrough Actress: Quvenzhané Wallis, Beasts of the Southern Wild

Best Directorial Debut: Benh Zeitlin, Beasts of the Southern Wild

Best Foreign Language Film:  Amour

Best Documentary: Searching For Sugar Man

William K. Everson Film History Award: 50 Years of Bond Films

Best Ensemble: Les Misérables

Spotlight Award: John Goodman

NBR Freedom of Expression Award: Central Park Five

NBR Freedom of Expression Award: Promised Land

 

 

Top 10 films

Argo

Beasts of the Southern Wild

Django Unchained

Les Miserables

Lincoln

Looper

The Perks of Being a Wallflower

Promised Land

Silver Linings Playbook

 

Top 10 Independent Films

Arbitrage

Bernie

Compliance

End of Watch

Hello I Must Be Going

Little Birds

Moonrise Kingdom

On the Road

Quartet

Sleepwalk with Me

 

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A statement from David Chase’s representative, Leslee Dart:

A journalist for Vox misconstrued what David Chase said in their interview. To simply quote David as saying,“ Tony Soprano is not dead,” is inaccurate. There is a much larger context for that statement and as such, it is not true. As David Chase has said numerous times on the record, “Whether Tony Soprano is alive or dead is not the point.” To continue to search for this answer is fruitless. The final scene of THE SOPRANOS raises a spiritual question that has no right or wrong answer.
~ David Chase Refutes Vox Writer

“By the time the sounds of the Von Trapp children warbling ‘Silent Night’ drift through The Giver, you may find yourself wondering what fresh movie hell this is. In truth, the enervating hash of dystopian dread, vague religiosity and commercial advertising-style uplift is nothing if not stale. Adapted from Lois Lowry’s book for young readers, the story involves an isolated society that, with its cubistic dwellings, mindless smiles, monochromatic environs and nebulous communitarianism, seem modeled on a Scandinavian country or an old Mentos commercial.”
~ Manohla Dargis’ Deadly Lede For Review Of The Giver