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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

Guy Fieri On NYT Review

I didn’t see the show this week… but I did pass Guy Fieri’s new restaurant multiple times this week… and it was a weird feeling… though there were still people eating there. But if this got cut in dress, SNL must have had a really good week, because this is both very funny, simple to digest even outside of Manhattan, and brief… 3 great things that go great together on SNL.

It’s also a great piece about much of criticism in many quarters.

9 Responses to “Guy Fieri On NYT Review”

  1. movielocke says:

    SNL was pretty good this week, not as good as last week, but still, after these most recent two weeks we put it on series record for the first time ever.

  2. Don R. Lewis says:

    Dude, SNL was atrocious this week and they didn’t even have Hurricane Sandy to blame it on.

  3. J says:

    Yeah, this week was dreadful. If anything good got cut, it could have been for time, as Renner sure took his sleepwalking and giggling at himself through the monologue. And it was pretty much downhill from there.

    The previous two weeks were good, though.

  4. matthew says:

    You know what I’m always curious about with SNL is why Deadline and THR and other sites have to do those “SNL RECAP!” posts. I mean, if you don’t watch it, is a text recap really going to do much for you? Explaining sketch comedy seems like a pretty pointless endeavor.

    I can get behind posting clips, but I’ll never understand the text posts unless it’s just an excuse to have a story for people to comment on.

  5. Bitplayer says:

    The guy didn’t put much effort into his impression or wardrobe. No obnoxious rings on his fat fingers? His restaurant was destined to be shit but I have to say why review the place so soon after opening? Don’t most critics wait a bit to review a place?

  6. berg says:

    you do realize that THE DARK knight rises is only 6-minutes shorter than CLoud ATlas

  7. Krillian says:

    SNL was weak this week. My favorite sketch was the last one, where Jeremy Renner’s supposed to identity the dead body as his dead brother and he keeps getting it wrong. “That’s Steven Tyler.”
    “No, no, it’s not.”
    “This is hard.”
    “It’s not THAT hard.”

  8. hcat says:

    I’m not an avid watcher anymore and will sometimes catch up on Hulu when I have the time, but it seems to me that they are having an exceptionally good season. Perhaps its because it is an election year, or that with Wiig having moved on they aren’t focusing on all of her recurring parts but what I have seen seems stronger than it has in a long time.

    My personal favorites so far this year were the undecided voters, the apple review, and the second Presidential debate.

    “Are there any new policies for Gun Control?”
    “Nope”
    “Not a Damn Thing”

  9. Js Partisan says:

    Renner may not have been great but the autopsy sketch, may be one of the best of the season.

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