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By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Dante Ferretti On Working With Pasolini (2’36″)

From Criterion’s “Trilogy of Life” boxset. “Legendary production designer Dante Ferretti is known to moviegoers everywhere for the elaborate and period-precise but fanciful worlds he has created for such films as Terry Gilliam’sThe Adventures of Baron MunchausenNeil Jordan’s Interview with the Vampire, and Martin Scorsese’s Hugo (for which he won an Oscar this year). Among his first projects as art director were the films in Pier Paolo Pasolini’s “Trilogy of Life,” which also tread the line between the gritty and the fantastic. In this clip from a new Criterion interview with him—who had already served as an assistant production designer on Pasolini’s The Gospel According to St. Matthew, The Hawks and the Sparrows, and Oedipus RexFerretti describes envisioning The Decameron with Pasolini, divulges the director’s penchant for sliding down banisters, and explains the importance of making mistakes.”

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“I am just grateful I am still around. I would love to be Steven Soderbergh, but I am lucky to be Joe Swanberg. Actors want to work with me, people want to give me money, and my nightmare scenario remains: Getting in bed with a studio, spending years on a movie, and it turns out horrible, but now I’m rich.”

Actually, by Hollywood standards, you’re right, I said. That is unambitious.

“It is, and yet, if you can go to bed happy at night, doing what you want, isn’t that ambition for a lifetime?”
~ Swanberg On Swanberg By Borelli

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