By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Voice Media Group Hires Scott Foundas as New York-Based Film Writer

Foundas’ Film Reviews and Features will Appear across Voice Media Group’s Print Publications, Websites and Mobile Platforms

DENVER, Oct. 31, 2012 — Voice Media Group announced today that Scott Foundas will join the staff of the Village Voice as its principal film writer.

Foundas spent the last three years as associate program director at the Film Society of Lincoln Center. Before moving to New York, he was the film editor at the Voice‘s sister paper in Los Angeles, LA Weekly, from 2005 to 2009.

“I’ve long admired Scott Foundas’ film writing and I’m delighted to be able to work with him again,” said Christine Brennan, VMG executive editor. “Scott is a formidable critic and a great addition to the film coverage our papers are known for.”

Foundas’ film reviews and features will appear in all of the Voice Media Group’s publications, as well as on their websites and mobile platforms.  VMG maintains a strong commitment to film journalism, employing two fulltime writers, one fulltime editor, and many freelance contributors. Its member newspapers covered more than 750 films last year, printed weekly film features and interviews, and published dispatches from national and international film festivals.

“I am thrilled to be returning to the world of weekly movie reviewing and feature writing,” said Foundas. “The VMG team of film critics publish exceptional work — always lively and thought-provoking — and I look forward to working alongside them.”

Foundas will begin his new assignment December 3.

About Voice Media Group Voice Media Group is a privately held media company focused on the creation of original news and entertainment content across print, mobile and web properties for the culturally aware consumer. The company will own and operate thirteen leading weekly newspapers — including Village Voice (New York), LA Weekly (Los Angeles), Westword (Denver), New Times (Phoenix), Houston Press, Dallas Observer, Riverfront Times (St. Louis), New Times (Miami), City Pages (Minneapolis), New Times (Broward), SF Weekly (San Francisco), Seattle Weekly, and OC Weekly (Orange County) — affiliated digital properties, and a national sales arm, VMG National. At its outset, VMG will reach more than seven million monthly readers in print and 16 million unique desktop visitors each month, in addition to 1.2 million email subscribers, more than 5.7 million visits on mobile, and more than forty signature food, music and arts events per year nationwide. Meanwhile, VMG National will serve more than 56 partner sites and publications with weekly print circulation of 3.14 million and 94 million pageviews per month. For more information, visit www.voicemediagroup.com.

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What’s up with your people mover shot, where it seems like people are kind of floating along?
Oh, my signature shot? That’s just a new way for people to move! It’s really become my Alfred Hitchcock cameo. I did not invent that shot, but Ernest and I did it on the set of Mo Better Blues, when Shorty had to walk [through the park], and I thought, “Let’s try it.” But after that, we tried to have a reason for it. For example, that wonderful sequence in Malcolm X where you hear the great song, “A Change Is Gonna Come.” The final scene is like that, Malcolm floating along to his destiny. In 25th Hour, after Philip Seymour Hoffman has kissed Anna Paquin, we did a shot like that, and it shows his state of mind. In Inside Man, after Denzel thinks he’s witnessed the murder of a hostage, we did the floating shot there.

So you just like the way it looks?
Yeah!
~ Spike Lee To Matt Zoller Seitz

“I never accepted the term contrarian. I think that’s offensive, frankly. And my response to that is: if I’m a contrarian, what are other reviewers? What I strive to do is be a good critic, not somebody who simply accepts the product put in front of me. I guess it scares people to think that they don’t have any originality; that they don’t have the capacity to think for themselves.

“There’s a line a lot of reviewers use that I don’t like at all. They say ‘accept the film on its own terms.’ What that really means is, ‘accept the film as it is advertised.’ That’s got nothing to do with criticism. Nothing to do with having a response as a film watcher. A thinking person has to analyze what’s on screen, not simply rubber-stamp it or kowtow to marketing.”m

“To me, everything does have a political component and I think it’s an interesting way to look at art. It’s one way that makes film reviewing, I think, a politically relevant form of journalism. We do live in a political world, and we bring our political sense to the movies with us – unless you’re the kind of person who goes to the movies and shuts off the outside world. I’m not that kind of person.”
~ Armond White to Luke Buckmaster