By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Voice Media Group Hires Scott Foundas as New York-Based Film Writer

Foundas’ Film Reviews and Features will Appear across Voice Media Group’s Print Publications, Websites and Mobile Platforms

DENVER, Oct. 31, 2012 — Voice Media Group announced today that Scott Foundas will join the staff of the Village Voice as its principal film writer.

Foundas spent the last three years as associate program director at the Film Society of Lincoln Center. Before moving to New York, he was the film editor at the Voice‘s sister paper in Los Angeles, LA Weekly, from 2005 to 2009.

“I’ve long admired Scott Foundas’ film writing and I’m delighted to be able to work with him again,” said Christine Brennan, VMG executive editor. “Scott is a formidable critic and a great addition to the film coverage our papers are known for.”

Foundas’ film reviews and features will appear in all of the Voice Media Group’s publications, as well as on their websites and mobile platforms.  VMG maintains a strong commitment to film journalism, employing two fulltime writers, one fulltime editor, and many freelance contributors. Its member newspapers covered more than 750 films last year, printed weekly film features and interviews, and published dispatches from national and international film festivals.

“I am thrilled to be returning to the world of weekly movie reviewing and feature writing,” said Foundas. “The VMG team of film critics publish exceptional work — always lively and thought-provoking — and I look forward to working alongside them.”

Foundas will begin his new assignment December 3.

About Voice Media Group Voice Media Group is a privately held media company focused on the creation of original news and entertainment content across print, mobile and web properties for the culturally aware consumer. The company will own and operate thirteen leading weekly newspapers — including Village Voice (New York), LA Weekly (Los Angeles), Westword (Denver), New Times (Phoenix), Houston Press, Dallas Observer, Riverfront Times (St. Louis), New Times (Miami), City Pages (Minneapolis), New Times (Broward), SF Weekly (San Francisco), Seattle Weekly, and OC Weekly (Orange County) — affiliated digital properties, and a national sales arm, VMG National. At its outset, VMG will reach more than seven million monthly readers in print and 16 million unique desktop visitors each month, in addition to 1.2 million email subscribers, more than 5.7 million visits on mobile, and more than forty signature food, music and arts events per year nationwide. Meanwhile, VMG National will serve more than 56 partner sites and publications with weekly print circulation of 3.14 million and 94 million pageviews per month. For more information, visit www.voicemediagroup.com.

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