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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30: Cloud Atlas, screenwriter/directors Lana Wachowski, Tom Tykwer, Andy Wachowski

7 Responses to “DP/30: Cloud Atlas, screenwriter/directors Lana Wachowski, Tom Tykwer, Andy Wachowski”

  1. berg says:

    at the 17 minutes mark (approx) the interview soars to new heights

  2. Heisenberg says:

    Damn, aside from Tom Tykwer desperately trying to get out of there at the 30 minute mark, and their publicist throwing out a bit of a burn towards DP at the very end, it was a great interview. Loved the epic rants on the philosophical nature of “Revolutions,” as well as Andy Wachowski’s understandable annoyance with film junkets.

  3. djiggs says:

    Amazing interview…I wish I had the chance to catch the late screening with Q&A at Fantastic Fest…Profound love/respect/admiration to the Wachowskis, Tykwer, and you David. Cornel West was not joshing when he said Lana was laser smart. What a wonderful soul.

  4. Danny says:

    Inspiring trio. Artistically and personally.

  5. Captain_Celluloid says:

    Yeah, AMAZING interview.

    Three totally different totally interesting
    personas. Well wrangled, David.

    All were impressively articulate and comfortably erudite
    without being pretentious . . . . loved the ONE BROW FILM
    line . . . . as Hollywood has forgotten how to make
    smart and adult large scale films . . . . which is sadly ironic
    considering how well Hollywood did with that type of film in the 70’s . . . . .

    I am now totally prepared to like the CLOUD ATLAS . . . . I am also now totally and pleasantly surprised by how comfortable we’ve all gotten with Lana NEE Larry . . . I know I have.

    I may still have trouble with pronoun selection but Lana is a totally interesting — and forgive me for framing it this way — “non-freakish” person . . . .
    as is Andy . . . . and I am really glad they’ve decided to start talking about their work. I guess we can at least partially thank Tom Tykwer

  6. sanj says:

    Andy Wachowski is funny….get him back …let him go off topic about movies.

  7. Rashad says:

    I really wish someone would get the Wachowskis for an hour, and have them talk about their 10 favorite movies. Would love to hear their thoughts.

    And I love Revolutions as well.

DP/30

Quote Unquotesee all »

“When books become a thing, they can no longer be fine.

“Literary people get mad at Knausgård the same way they get mad at Jonathan Franzen, a writer who, if I’m being honest, might be fine. I’m rarely honest about Jonathan Franzen. He’s an extremely annoying manI have only read bits and pieces of his novels, and while I’ve stopped reading many novels even though they were pretty good or great, I have always stopped reading Jonathan Franzen’s novels because I thought they were aggressively boring and dumb and smug. But why do I think this? I didn’t read him when he was a new interesting writer who wrote a couple of weird books and then hit it big with ‘The Corrections,’ a moment in which I might have picked him up with curiosity and read with an open mind; I only noticed him once, after David Foster Wallace had died, he became the heir apparent for the Great American Novelist position, once he had had that thing with Oprah and started giving interviews in which he said all manner of dumb shit; I only noticed him well after I had been told he was An Important Writer.

“So I can’t and shouldn’t pretend that I am unmoved by the lazily-satisfied gentle arrogance he projects or when he is given license to project it by the has-the-whole-world-gone-crazy development of him being constantly crowned and re-crowned as Is He The Great American Writer. What I really object to is this, and if there’s anything to his writing beyond it, I can’t see it and can’t be bothered. Others read him and tell me he’s actually a good writer—people whose critical instincts I have learned to respect—so I feel sure that he’s probably a perfectly fine, that his books are fine, and that probably even his stupid goddamned bird essays are probably also fine.

“But it’s too late. He has become a thing; he can’t be fine.”
~ Aaron Bady

“You know how in postproduction you are supposed to color-correct the picture so everything is smooth and even? Jean-Luc wants the opposite. He wants the rupture. Color and then black and white, or different intensities of color. Or how in this film, sometimes you see the ratio of the frame change after the image begins. That happens when he records from his TV onto his old DVCAM analog machine, which is so old we can’t even find parts when it needs to be repaired. The TV takes time to recognize and adjust to the format on the DVD or the Blu-ray. Whether it’s 1:33 or 1:85. And one of the TVs he uses is slower than the other. He wants to keep all that. I could correct it, but he doesn’t want me to. See, here’s an image from War and Peace. He did the overlays of color—red, white, and blue—using an old analog video effects machine. That’s why you have the blur. When I tried to redo it in digital, I couldn’t. The edges were too sharp. And why the image jitters—I don’t know how he did that. Playing with the cable maybe. Handmade. He wants to see that. It’s a gift from his old machine.”
~ Fabrice Aragno