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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30 @ TIFF 2012: Silver Linings Playbook, actor Bradley Cooper

9 Responses to “DP/30 @ TIFF 2012: Silver Linings Playbook, actor Bradley Cooper”

  1. Andrew S says:

    Wow David – when did you become such a tough interviewer? You really grilled him, but in a good way. Kudos!

  2. David Poland says:

    Every conversation has its own atmosphere. Bradley was a very game subject. I didn’t think I was being tough at all.

  3. sanj says:

    DP – you didn’t ask enough about other movies other than hangover series ….

  4. StellaPD says:

    In all fairness, the conversation is less than 30 minutes long. He can only ask so many questions, and Cooper is promoting specific films that played in Toronto. Those films are mentioned along with The Hangover I/II and Limitless. If you tried covering everything he’s done, you’d have 15 second answers and a lackluster interview. I enjoyed it. Cooper seems like a thoughtful, intelligent dude.

  5. sanj says:

    yeah but they didn’t even talk about Limitless in any sort of detail .. discussing a few smaller movies he’s done might have been interesting …like the Midnight Meat Train

  6. berg says:

    I want to see a DP/30 with Joaquin Phoenix where you ask him his name five times in a row

  7. The Pope says:

    Great interview. Really fast, really engaging. A helluva lotta ground covered.

  8. Hallick says:

    It’s no longer the time to talk about Limitless in detail, sanj. If it didn’t come up, it didn’t come up.

  9. I totally agree with David, you will made this guy sweat like a pig and I like that too. I think these are the best interviews actually, when you will really put these guys in the spot with no worries.

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DP/30

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“There are critics who see their job as to be on the side of the artist, or in a state of imaginative sympathy or alliance with the artist. I think it’s important for a critic to be populist in the sense that we’re on the side of the public. I think one of the reasons is, frankly, capitalism. Whether you’re talking about restaurants or you’re talking about movies, you’re talking about large-scale commercial enterprises that are trying to sell themselves and market themselves and publicize themselves. A critic is, in a way, offering consumer advice. I think it’s very, very important in a time where everything is commercialized, commodified, and branded, where advertising is constantly bleeding into other forms of discourse, for there to be an independent voice kind of speaking to—and to some extent on behalf of—the public.”
~ A. O. Scott On One Role Of The Critic

“Every night, we’d sit and talk for a long, long time and talk about the process and I knew he was very, very intrigued about what could be happening. Then of course, one of the fascinating things he told me about was how he had readers who were reading for him that never knew it was Stanley Kubrick. So if he heard of a novel, he would send it out to people. I think he did it through newspaper ads at the time. And he would send it out to people and ask for a kind of synopsis or a critique of the novel. And he would read those. And it was done anonymously. But he said there were housewives and there were barristers and all sorts of people doing that. And I thought, yeah, that’s a really good way to open up the possibilities. Because otherwise, you’re randomly looking, walking through a bookstore or an airport. I said, “How many people are doing this?” It was about 30 people.”
~ George Miller’s Conversations With Kubrick