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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30 @ TIFF 2012: Silver Linings Playbook, actor Bradley Cooper

9 Responses to “DP/30 @ TIFF 2012: Silver Linings Playbook, actor Bradley Cooper”

  1. Andrew S says:

    Wow David – when did you become such a tough interviewer? You really grilled him, but in a good way. Kudos!

  2. David Poland says:

    Every conversation has its own atmosphere. Bradley was a very game subject. I didn’t think I was being tough at all.

  3. sanj says:

    DP – you didn’t ask enough about other movies other than hangover series ….

  4. StellaPD says:

    In all fairness, the conversation is less than 30 minutes long. He can only ask so many questions, and Cooper is promoting specific films that played in Toronto. Those films are mentioned along with The Hangover I/II and Limitless. If you tried covering everything he’s done, you’d have 15 second answers and a lackluster interview. I enjoyed it. Cooper seems like a thoughtful, intelligent dude.

  5. sanj says:

    yeah but they didn’t even talk about Limitless in any sort of detail .. discussing a few smaller movies he’s done might have been interesting …like the Midnight Meat Train

  6. berg says:

    I want to see a DP/30 with Joaquin Phoenix where you ask him his name five times in a row

  7. The Pope says:

    Great interview. Really fast, really engaging. A helluva lotta ground covered.

  8. Hallick says:

    It’s no longer the time to talk about Limitless in detail, sanj. If it didn’t come up, it didn’t come up.

  9. I totally agree with David, you will made this guy sweat like a pig and I like that too. I think these are the best interviews actually, when you will really put these guys in the spot with no worries.

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DP/30

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Tsangari: With my next film, White Knuckles, it comes with a budget — it’s going to be a huge new world for me. As always when I enter into a new thing, don’t you wonder how it’s going to be and how much of yourself you are going to have to sacrifice? The ballet of all of this. I’m already imaging the choreography — not of the camera, but the choreography of actually bringing it to life. It is as fascinating as the shooting itself. I find the producing as exciting as the directing. The one informs the other. There is this producer-director hat that I constantly wear. I’ve been thinking about these early auteurs, like Howard Hawks and John Ford and Preston Sturges—all of these guys basically were hired by the studio, and I doubt they had final cut, and somehow they had films that now we can say they had their signatures.  There are different ways of being creative within the parameters and limitations of production. The only thing you cannot negotiate is stupidity.
Filmmaker: And unfortunately, there is an abundance of that in the world.
Tsangari: This is the only big risk: stupidity. Everything else is completely worked out in the end.
~ Chevalier‘s Rachel Athina Tsangari

“The middle-range movies that I was doing have largely either stopped being made, or they’ve moved to television, now that television is a go-to medium for directors who can’t get work in theatricals, because there are so few theatricals being made. But also with the new miniseries concept, you can tell a long story in detail without having to cram it all into 90 minutes. You don’t have to cut the characters and take out the secondary people. You can actually put them all on a big canvas. And it is a big canvas, because people have bigger screens now, so there’s no aesthetic difference between the way you shoot a movie and the way you shoot a TV show.

“Which is all for the good. But what’s happened in the interim is that theatrical movies being a spectacle business are now either giant blockbuster movies that run three hours—even superhero movies run three hours, they used to run like 58 minutes!—and the others, which are dysfunctional family independent movies or the slob comedy or the kiddie movie, and those are all low-budget. So the middle ground of movies that were about things, they’re just gone. Or else they’re on HBO. Like the Bryan Cranston LBJ movie, which years ago would’ve been made for theaters.

“You’ve got people like Paul Schrader and Walter Hill who can’t get their movies theatrically distributed because there’s no market for it. So they end up going to VOD, and VOD is a model from which no one makes any money, because most of the time, as soon as they get on the site, they’re pirated. So the whole model of the system right now is completely broken. And whether or not anybody’s going to try to fix, or if it even can be fixed, I don’t know. But it’s certainly not the same business that I got into in the ’70s.”
~ Joe Dante

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