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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30 @ TIFF 2012: Silver Linings Playbook, actor Bradley Cooper

9 Responses to “DP/30 @ TIFF 2012: Silver Linings Playbook, actor Bradley Cooper”

  1. Andrew S says:

    Wow David – when did you become such a tough interviewer? You really grilled him, but in a good way. Kudos!

  2. David Poland says:

    Every conversation has its own atmosphere. Bradley was a very game subject. I didn’t think I was being tough at all.

  3. sanj says:

    DP – you didn’t ask enough about other movies other than hangover series ….

  4. StellaPD says:

    In all fairness, the conversation is less than 30 minutes long. He can only ask so many questions, and Cooper is promoting specific films that played in Toronto. Those films are mentioned along with The Hangover I/II and Limitless. If you tried covering everything he’s done, you’d have 15 second answers and a lackluster interview. I enjoyed it. Cooper seems like a thoughtful, intelligent dude.

  5. sanj says:

    yeah but they didn’t even talk about Limitless in any sort of detail .. discussing a few smaller movies he’s done might have been interesting …like the Midnight Meat Train

  6. berg says:

    I want to see a DP/30 with Joaquin Phoenix where you ask him his name five times in a row

  7. The Pope says:

    Great interview. Really fast, really engaging. A helluva lotta ground covered.

  8. Hallick says:

    It’s no longer the time to talk about Limitless in detail, sanj. If it didn’t come up, it didn’t come up.

  9. I totally agree with David, you will made this guy sweat like a pig and I like that too. I think these are the best interviews actually, when you will really put these guys in the spot with no worries.

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DP/30

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CATHERINE LACEY: Do you think that your writer DNA was sort of shaped by how your family was displaced by the Nazi regime before you were born?
RENATA ADLER: It’s funny that you should mention that because I think it affects a lot else, specifically being a refugee. I wasn’t born there. I didn’t experience any of it. But they were refugees. So then I was thinking of this business of being a refugee, no matter in what sense.

Prenatal refugee.
Prenatal refugee and actually postnatal refugee. And I thought there are probably things in common between being a child and being a refugee and being an anthropologist.

It gives you a sense of curiosity.
But also a complete displacement. You’ve got to read the situation. You’re the new kid in school all the time. But I wasn’t aware of it then. I’m aware of it now because language affects you differently, or not. But I used to talk to Mike Nichols about it because he was a refugee. Do you envision an audience when you write? Do you envision a particular person? 

No.
Every once in a while I think: Now, what would Mike say to that?

There’s that idea that when you’re blocked, you can always just write as if it was a letter to one specific person.
Oh, that’s good. That’s a wonderful idea. Mine is more in terms of criticism. If someone was to say, “I know what that is. Do you really want to do that?” But anyway, about Mike and his attitude toward language, I remember him saying—it was a question of whether something written was fresh or not—and he would ask, “Why not smell it?” Which, from an English speaker’s point of view, is hysterical.

~ Renata Adler and Catherine Lacey In Conversation 

“Oh it was just hellish. This is the worst thing that ever happened to me. It would be stupid for me to say that I didn’t know what I was getting into. It has taken me five years to decide on a first film and I always held out for something like this. The lesson to be learned is that you can’t take on an enterprise of this size and scope if you don’t have a movie like The Terminator or Jaws behind you. Because when everybody’s wringing their handkerchiefs and sweating and puking blood over the money, it’s very nice to be able to say, ‘This is the guy who directed the biggest grossing movie of all time, sit down, shut up and feel lucky that you’ve got him.’ It’s another thing when you are there and you’re going ‘Trust me, this is really what I believe in,’ and they turn round and say ‘Well, who the hell is this guy?’ If I make ten shitty movies, I’ll deserve the flak and if I go on to make 10 great ones, this’ll probably be looked upon as my first bungled masterpiece.”
~ David Fincher, 1992

 

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