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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30 @ TIFF 2012: Silver Linings Playbook, actor Bradley Cooper

9 Responses to “DP/30 @ TIFF 2012: Silver Linings Playbook, actor Bradley Cooper”

  1. Andrew S says:

    Wow David – when did you become such a tough interviewer? You really grilled him, but in a good way. Kudos!

  2. David Poland says:

    Every conversation has its own atmosphere. Bradley was a very game subject. I didn’t think I was being tough at all.

  3. sanj says:

    DP – you didn’t ask enough about other movies other than hangover series ….

  4. StellaPD says:

    In all fairness, the conversation is less than 30 minutes long. He can only ask so many questions, and Cooper is promoting specific films that played in Toronto. Those films are mentioned along with The Hangover I/II and Limitless. If you tried covering everything he’s done, you’d have 15 second answers and a lackluster interview. I enjoyed it. Cooper seems like a thoughtful, intelligent dude.

  5. sanj says:

    yeah but they didn’t even talk about Limitless in any sort of detail .. discussing a few smaller movies he’s done might have been interesting …like the Midnight Meat Train

  6. berg says:

    I want to see a DP/30 with Joaquin Phoenix where you ask him his name five times in a row

  7. The Pope says:

    Great interview. Really fast, really engaging. A helluva lotta ground covered.

  8. Hallick says:

    It’s no longer the time to talk about Limitless in detail, sanj. If it didn’t come up, it didn’t come up.

  9. I totally agree with David, you will made this guy sweat like a pig and I like that too. I think these are the best interviews actually, when you will really put these guys in the spot with no worries.

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“We don’t defy the laws of physics: There are no flying men or cars in this movie. So it made sense to do it old-school: real vehicles and real human beings in the desert. We shot the movie more or less in continuity, because the cars and the characters get really banged up along the way. The biggest benefit of digital technology for me was that the cameras were smaller and much more agile, so you could put them anywhere. We also spent a huge amount of time on spatial awareness—making sure the viewer could follow the action and understand what was happening. There has to be a strong causal connection from one shot to the next, just the same way that in music, there has to be a connection from one note to the next. Otherwise it’s just noise. Too often, if you just cram a lot of stuff into the frame, you get the illusion of a fast pace. But there’s no coherence. It doesn’t flow. It comes off as headbanging music, and it can be exhausting. We storyboarded the movie before we had a script: We had 3,500 boards, which helps the cast and crew understand how everything is going to fit together. Movies are getting faster and faster. The Road Warrior had 1,200 cuts. This one has 2,700 cuts. You have to treat it like a symphony.”
~ George Miller

“I was having issues with my script for It’s All About Love, so I called Ingmar Bergman and we ended up talking about everything but the script. He said, “Well, Festen is a masterpiece, so what are you going to do now?” At that point, I had not decided if I was going to make It’s All About Love, so I answered, “Hmmm, I don’t know. Maybe this, maybe that.” There was just a long pause, and then he said, “You’re fucked.” I said, “Well, how can you know?” “Well, Thomas, you always have to decide your next movie before the movie you’re doing presently opens.” And I said, “Why is that?” “Well, two things can happen. One thing is that you fail, and then you’ll feel scared and humiliated. It’ll get into your head. Second, and even worse, you have success, and then you’ll want more of it, or you’ll want to maintain it. But if you decide on your next film while you’re in the middle of editing, it becomes a very nonchalant choice. And then it’s shorter from the heart to the hand.”
~ Thomas Vinterberg

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