By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30: Director Tony Scott, Unstoppable

5 Responses to “DP/30: Director Tony Scott, Unstoppable”

  1. quizkid8279 says:

    Wow, did Jeff Wells write the home-page blurb about this video?

  2. The Pope says:

    David,
    Thanks for reminding us of this interview. A jovial, soft spoken fellow who seems to have lived as much as he could when he could. I’m reading he had been diagnosed with inoperable brain cancer, so perhaps he could not face such a decline in activity. Thoughts to his wife and kids and his last surviving brother, Ridley.

    His first short film, an adaptation of Ambrose Bierce’s One of the Missing is available to view here.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s0cAi8LKXnM

  3. K. Bowen says:

    David, I love your breakdown of the Dargis tribute on the front page. You hit the right highlights. And yes, Dargis gets Tony Scott.

  4. David Poland says:

    KB – Ray Pride gets credit for that.

  5. James Westby says:

    Ray Pride RULES.

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“One of my favorite things in watching any performance on film is when there isn’t a lot of cutting going on and when you get a chance to become really absorbed in the artist in hand. The same way we do, hopefully, at a concert, when we get a chance to really trip in to something that’s happening on stage. Whether the singer’s singing, or one of the other musicians is playing, we sort of stay there instead of cutting round with our eyes a lot.”
~ Jonathan Demme

“We’ve talked about this before in the past, my obsession with the Shakespearean histories having the ideal combination of the sweet and the sour. In ‘Henry IV, Part II’ which we’ve discussed before, in the end of that story it’s very complex and haunting because Prince Hal becomes Henry the King, and he has transcended his hoodlum days and at the ceremony is Falstaff, his good friend with whom he has really fucked around and been a loser with, and Falstaff comes up to him and says, ‘Now that you’re king we can really party,’ and the king famously says, ‘I know thee not, old man.’ It becomes Henry IV’s anointment and Falstaff’s catastrophe. That’s life. I have experienced very little unfettered triumph. There are moments, such as when my children are born, but even that comes with new fears and anxieties. In a sense the better you can communicate that life is both at once, the more powerful over time something becomes. One strives for something where the threads are there because it lasts in way that is very palpable. The idea of a tragedy is powerful in literature and theater, but in cinema it doesn’t work, certainly not commercially, and less so critically. Why is that? I think it has to do with how movies are so close to us.”
~ James Gray