By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

A24 OPENS DOORS FOR FILM DISTRIBUTION, FINANCE AND PRODUCTION

Daniel Katz, David Fenkel, John Hodges launch Company 

NEW YORK, NY (August 20, 2012) — Daniel Katz, David Fenkel and John Hodges today announced the formation of A24, a New York-based film company focused on distribution, financing and production. A24 will acquire finished films, and also finance and produce its own content.  The company plans to distribute eight to ten titles per year, several of which will have wide theatrical releases.

Commented Katz, Fenkel, and Hodges: “We see an exciting opportunity right now for movies in the domestic space especially given all the new ways to target moviegoers and the changes that are happening in the marketplace. We are looking forward to working with great storytellers to bring their films to audiences.”

Katz led the film finance group at Guggenheim Partners where he participated in over $500 million of film, TV and digital financing transactions, including THE SOCIAL NETWORK, ZOMBIELAND, the TWILIGHT franchise and TENDERNESS.

Fenkel was formerly President and Partner of NYC-based Oscilloscope Laboratories, Adam Yauch’s film distribution and production company.  Fenkel and Yauch co-founded the company in 2008, and Fenkel maintained oversight of all aspects of the company including theatrical, in-house DVD, and direct digital distribution, acquisitions, marketing, and operations.  In its first four years, Oscilloscope’s films received six Oscar nominations.  Fenkel spearheaded releases for Lynne Ramsay’s Golden Globenominated WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT KEVIN starring Tilda Swinton, John C. Reilly, and Ezra Miller, Oren Moverman’s Oscar-nominated THE MESSENGER starring Ben Foster, Woody Harrelson and Samantha Morton and Kelly Reichardt’s WENDY & LUCY, both starring Michelle Williams.

Hodges previously served as Head of Production & Development at Big Beach Films (LITTLE MISS SUNSHINE, SUNSHINE CLEANING, AWAY WE GO, OUR IDIOT BROTHER).  Hodges executive produced the Jesse Peretz’s OUR IDIOT BROTHER starring Paul Rudd and Elizabeth Banks; and Colin Trevorrow’s SAFETY NOT GUARANTEED starring Aubrey Plaza and Jake M. Johnson.  He also produced the just completed Jordan Vogt-Roberts TOY’S HOUSE, based on Chris Gulletta’s Black List script. Prior to joining Big Beach, Hodges was a Production Executive at Lorne Michaels and John Goldwyn’s Paramount-based production company, and previously was an Acquisitions Executive at both Focus Features and USA Films.

A24 headquarters will be in NYC.

Facebook.com/A24Films

A24Films.com

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2 Responses to “A24 OPENS DOORS FOR FILM DISTRIBUTION, FINANCE AND PRODUCTION”

  1. Paul Friedman says:

    TO: Daniel Katz, David Fenkel and John Hodges
    at A24

    Dear Mr. Kata, Fenkel and Hodges,

    I am aware that A24 often produces its own content. Below, I seek your company’s interest in producing my spec comedy “MOB CAMP”.

    “MOB CAMP”
    – A coming-of-age satirical black comedy –

    LOGLINE: Rebellious teens of Mafia dons are packed off to ‘Mob Camp’ to learn the tools-of-the-trade, but the choice of camp-location has dislodged the brutal Spanish-Harlem Mafia: Big Mistakesy!

    ****

    A Teensy-Weensy More Story: The young hero of our story, never interested in the ‘family business’, wants to be a writer. His first book, a sex manual for teenagers titled: “DOING IT RIGHT THE FIRST TIME” is a New York Times Best Seller! — Near the end of camp training, our young hero’s father (a Mafia don) is seriously wounded and the youngster returns home to destroy his father’s enemies.

    Nothing wrong with that, but the kid has fallen in love with the daughter of his father’s most dreaded enemy, a don of the ruthless Spanish Mafia!

    May I send you a copy of Mob Camp?

    Paul L. Friedman
    Adjunct Professor, USC Cinema
    Screenwriting Div.
    friedmac3@gmail.com
    310-433-3436 Cell

  2. Paul Friedman says:

    TO: Daniel Katz, David Fenkel and John Hodges
    at A24

    Dear Mr. Kata, Fenkel and Hodges,

    I am aware that A24 often produces its own content. Below, I seek your company’s interest in producing my spec comedy “MOB CAMP”.

    “MOB CAMP”
    – A coming-of-age satirical black comedy –

    LOGLINE: Rebellious teens of Mafia dons are packed off to ‘Mob Camp’ to learn the tools-of-the-trade, but the choice of camp-location has dislodged the brutal Spanish-Harlem Mafia: Big Mistakesy!

    ****

    A Teensy-Weensy More Story: The young hero of our story, never interested in the ‘family business’, wants to be a writer. His first book, a sex manual for teenagers titled: “DOING IT RIGHT THE FIRST TIME” is a New York Times Best Seller! — Near the end of camp training, our young hero’s father (a Mafia don) is seriously wounded and the youngster returns home to destroy his father’s enemies.

    Nothing wrong with that, but the kid has fallen in love with the daughter of his father’s most dreaded enemy — a don of the ruthless Spanish Mafia!

    May I send you a copy of Mob Camp?

    Paul L. Friedman
    Adjunct Professor
    USC Cinema – Screenwriting Div.
    friedmac3@gmail.com
    310-433-3436 Cell

Quote Unquotesee all »

“I had this friend who was my roommate for a while. She seemed really normal in every way except that she wouldn’t buy shampoo. She would only use my shampoo. And after a year it’s like, “When are you going to buy your own shampoo?” It was her way of digging in her heels. It was a certain sense of entitlement, or a certain anger. It was so interesting to me why she wouldn’t buy her own fucking shampoo. It was like,“I’m gonna use yours.” It was coming from a place of “You have more money than me, I just know it”—whether I did or I didn’t. Or maybe she felt, “You have a better life than me,” or “You have a better room than me in the apartment.” It was hostile. And she was a really close friend! There was never any other shampoo and I knew she was washing her hair. And clearly I have a thing about shampoo, as we see in ‘Friends with Money.’ I had some nice shampoo. So I found that psychologically so interesting how a person can function normally in every way and yet have this aberrance—it’s like a skip in the record. It was a sense of entitlement, I think. I put that in Olivia’s character, too, with her stealing someone’s face cream.”
Nicole Holofcener

“When books become a thing, they can no longer be fine.

“Literary people get mad at Knausgård the same way they get mad at Jonathan Franzen, a writer who, if I’m being honest, might be fine. I’m rarely honest about Jonathan Franzen. He’s an extremely annoying manI have only read bits and pieces of his novels, and while I’ve stopped reading many novels even though they were pretty good or great, I have always stopped reading Jonathan Franzen’s novels because I thought they were aggressively boring and dumb and smug. But why do I think this? I didn’t read him when he was a new interesting writer who wrote a couple of weird books and then hit it big with ‘The Corrections,’ a moment in which I might have picked him up with curiosity and read with an open mind; I only noticed him once, after David Foster Wallace had died, he became the heir apparent for the Great American Novelist position, once he had had that thing with Oprah and started giving interviews in which he said all manner of dumb shit; I only noticed him well after I had been told he was An Important Writer.

“So I can’t and shouldn’t pretend that I am unmoved by the lazily-satisfied gentle arrogance he projects or when he is given license to project it by the has-the-whole-world-gone-crazy development of him being constantly crowned and re-crowned as Is He The Great American Writer. What I really object to is this, and if there’s anything to his writing beyond it, I can’t see it and can’t be bothered. Others read him and tell me he’s actually a good writer—people whose critical instincts I have learned to respect—so I feel sure that he’s probably a perfectly fine, that his books are fine, and that probably even his stupid goddamned bird essays are probably also fine.

“But it’s too late. He has become a thing; he can’t be fine.”
~ Aaron Bady