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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

Walt Disney’s Taxi Driver by Bryan Boyce

The last minute’s the best minute.

And the Fair Use conversation… remains tough… but I think this is one with the right argument… and can never be distributed for money.

3 Responses to “Walt Disney’s Taxi Driver by Bryan Boyce”

  1. The Pope says:

    David,
    I think this would be protected because it is only a portion of the film. And it is also a parody… which would probably come under freedom of speech.

    For what it’s worth… Once upon a time, before the age of mass production, copyright did not exist. Once it arrived, laws had to be written to grasp this new reality. Same here with the internet. And until such time as the studios and Congress get themselves up to speed, they will not be able to enforce laws that are now antiquated.

  2. palmtree says:

    Also, the film has been altered.

  3. Bitplayer says:

    Nobody needs to enforce any laws one of the largest companies in the world will call one of the most powerful companies in the world and ask them to delete it and they will, end of story no “legal” action.

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Aloha is the movie equivalent of a man in a donkey suit with a tree branch growing out of his forehead. I don’t know what the fuck this movie is. It feels like Cameron Crowe tried to make some Pynchonesque contemporary riff on Casablanca, then either or he or the studio chickened out halfway through and tried to turn it back into Jerry Maguire. But don’t confuse Aloha with hackwork. It’s more like a mad scientist had 10 beakers bubbling, and instead of unlocking cold fusion, he blew up his lab and melted an ear. I swear, this movie is like some bastard offspring of Casablanca, Inherent Vice, ‘Goosebumps,’ and ‘Baywatch Hawaii.’ My takeaway? Making movies is hard, yo.”
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“We don’t defy the laws of physics: There are no flying men or cars in this movie. So it made sense to do it old-school: real vehicles and real human beings in the desert. We shot the movie more or less in continuity, because the cars and the characters get really banged up along the way. The biggest benefit of digital technology for me was that the cameras were smaller and much more agile, so you could put them anywhere. We also spent a huge amount of time on spatial awareness—making sure the viewer could follow the action and understand what was happening. There has to be a strong causal connection from one shot to the next, just the same way that in music, there has to be a connection from one note to the next. Otherwise it’s just noise. Too often, if you just cram a lot of stuff into the frame, you get the illusion of a fast pace. But there’s no coherence. It doesn’t flow. It comes off as headbanging music, and it can be exhausting. We storyboarded the movie before we had a script: We had 3,500 boards, which helps the cast and crew understand how everything is going to fit together. Movies are getting faster and faster. The Road Warrior had 1,200 cuts. This one has 2,700 cuts. You have to treat it like a symphony.”
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