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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

Walt Disney’s Taxi Driver by Bryan Boyce

The last minute’s the best minute.

And the Fair Use conversation… remains tough… but I think this is one with the right argument… and can never be distributed for money.

3 Responses to “Walt Disney’s Taxi Driver by Bryan Boyce”

  1. The Pope says:

    David,
    I think this would be protected because it is only a portion of the film. And it is also a parody… which would probably come under freedom of speech.

    For what it’s worth… Once upon a time, before the age of mass production, copyright did not exist. Once it arrived, laws had to be written to grasp this new reality. Same here with the internet. And until such time as the studios and Congress get themselves up to speed, they will not be able to enforce laws that are now antiquated.

  2. palmtree says:

    Also, the film has been altered.

  3. Bitplayer says:

    Nobody needs to enforce any laws one of the largest companies in the world will call one of the most powerful companies in the world and ask them to delete it and they will, end of story no “legal” action.

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“I am just grateful I am still around. I would love to be Steven Soderbergh, but I am lucky to be Joe Swanberg. Actors want to work with me, people want to give me money, and my nightmare scenario remains: Getting in bed with a studio, spending years on a movie, and it turns out horrible, but now I’m rich.”

Actually, by Hollywood standards, you’re right, I said. That is unambitious.

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~ Swanberg On Swanberg By Borelli

“In retrospect, nothing of that kind surprised me about Philip, because his intuition was luminous from the instant you met him. So was his intelligence. A lot of actors act intelligent, but Philip was the real thing: a shining, artistic polymath with an intelligence that came at you like a pair of headlights and enveloped you from the moment he grabbed your hand, put a huge arm round your neck and shoved a cheek against yours; or if the mood took him, hugged you to him like a big, pudgy schoolboy, then stood and beamed at you while he took stock of the effect.”
John le Carré on Philip Seymour Hoffman