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Kim Voynar

By Kim Voynar Voynar@moviecitynews.com

Who Was Amos Vogel?

Over on Film Comment, Film Society of Lincoln Center’s Eugene Hernandez has a nice piece up about independent film vanguard Amos Vogel, who passed away today at the age of 91, and if you don’t know much about Vogel you should go read it. Eugene’s piece points to this excellent documentary about Vogel, Film as a Subversive Art, which you can watch in its entirety for free on Vimeo. It’s roughly 56 minutes long, and you’ll likely learn something about this amazing man to whom independent cinema owes a debt of eternal gratitude. Most of it is Vogel, just talking to the camera about his life and career. It’s pretty awesome. Check it out.

RIP, Amos Vogel.

Click here to view the video.

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 “Teaching how to make a film is like trying to teach someone how to fuck. You can’t. You have to fuck to learn how to fuck. It’s just how it is. The filmmaker has to protect the adventurous side of their self. I’m an explorer, I’m an inventor. Doc Brown is the character I relate to the most and he’s a madman. He’s a madman alone, locked up with his ideas but he does whatever he wants. He makes what he makes because he wants to make it. Yes, the DeLorean has to work in order for him to be a madman with a purpose—the DeLorean should work—but the point is I think everyone should try and find their own DeLorean. When Zemeckis was trying to get Back To The Future made, which he was for seven years, he was trying to get a film made where basically a teenager gets in a time machine, goes back to 1954 and almost —-s his mother. That pitch is extremely subversive and twisted in a way. My point is, he had a fascinating idea that no one had done before, but was clearly special to him and he stuck to it and made it what it was. When you do that you can create culture, but I think a lot of movies are just echoing culture and there’s a difference.”
~ A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night Filmmaker Ana Lily Amirpour

Six rules for filmmaking from Mike Nichols
1. The careful application of terror is an important form of communication.
2. Anything worth fighting for is worth fighting dirty for.
3. There’s absolutely no substitute for genuine lack of preparation.
4. If you think there’s good in everybody, you haven’t met everybody.
5. Friends may come and go but enemies will certainly become studio heads.
6. No one ever lost anything by asking for more money.
~ Via Larry Karaszewski and Howard A. Rodman On Facebook