By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

WARNER BROS. DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION LAUNCHES “INSIDE THE SCRIPT” DIGITAL PUBLISHING INITIATIVE

MOVIE FANS CAN NOW OWN DIGITAL VERSIONS OF SCRIPTS FROM ICONIC FILMS INCLUDING “CASABLANCA,” “BEN-HUR,” “AN AMERICAN IN PARIS” AND “NORTH BY NORTHWEST” COMPLETE WITH RARE NOTES, PUBLICITY STILLS AND OTHER INTERACTIVE ASSETS

FIRST “INSIDE THE SCRIPT” TITLES NOW AVAILABLE ON iBOOKSTORE, KINDLE AND NOOK®
BURBANK, CALIF., April 30, 2012 – Warner Bros. Digital Distribution (WBDD) today announced the launch of “Inside the Script” – a digital publishing initiative that gives movie fans an innovative new way to go deep inside their favorite films.  Available now for iBookstore, Kindle and NOOK by Barnes & Noble, “Inside the Script” is a series of highly illustrated eBooks that contain the film’s actual shooting script, rare materials from the Warner Bros. Corporate Archive and much more.  The first series of “Inside the Script” titles are based on timeless, cinematic treasures including “Casablanca,” “Ben-Hur,” “An American in Paris” and “North by Northwest.”

“Inside the Script” offers movie fans an all-access pass to go behind-the-scenes of the films they know and love.  Every “Inside the Script” title includes the film’s complete shooting script in a customizable eBook format; dozens of chapters about the script and the film that detail the movie’s development; rare historical documents such as production notes, storyboards and candid photos; and an interactive image gallery of costumes, on-set stills, movie posters, set designs and behind-the-scenes photos.
“People love movies because of the stories they tell,” said Thomas Gewecke, President of Warner Bros. Digital Distribution. “Now we can give fans rarely seen details of how these stories came together and take their enjoyment of films to a whole new level.”
Highlighted elements from “Inside the Script” titles include:


“Casablanca”

- Jack Warner’s telegrams and memos
- Producer Hal Wallis’ script and production notes
- Production Code Administration letters, notes and seal of approval
- Telegram from producer Hal Wallis refuting his fight with Jack Warner

“Ben-Hur”
– Rare behind-the-scenes materials including makeup and wardrobe tests, production design sketches, sample matte paintings
- A forward and captions written by Charlton Heston’s son, Fraser C. Heston
- Excerpts from Charlton Heston’s acting and shooting journals during filming
- Details about the development of Panavision and MGM’s proprietary widescreen process (MGM Camera 65)


“An American in Paris”
- Full shooting script
- Detailed descriptions from continuity script’s musical numbers
- Treatment for the ballet sequence from Vincente Minnelli’s papers
- Set design paintings from the MGM production design collection
- Tickets to the film’s Hollywood premiere from MGM makeup artist John Truwe


“North by Northwest”
- Director Alfred Hitchcock’s editing and main title sequence notes
- Composer Bernard Herrmann’s music notes
- Photos and documents from Alfred Hitchcock’s papers:
- story department photos
- storyboards and photos of crop duster sequence
- production schedules and daily scene reports
- hair and makeup tests
- costume sketches
“Inside the Script” releases are now available for iBookstore, Kindle and NOOK for $9.99 per title.  For more information visit www.facebook.com/insidethescript.



About Warner Bros. Digital Distribution
Warner Bros. Digital Distribution (WBDD) oversees the electronic distribution of Warner Bros. Home Entertainment Group’s content through Video-On-Demand, Pay-Per-View, Electronic Sell-Through and Subscription Video-On-Demand via cable, satellite, online and mobile channels.   WBDD also distributes content through third party digital retailers and licensees.  A worldwide industry leader since its inception, WBDD also manages the Studio’s E-commerce sites that include WBShop.com and WarnerArchive.com.  Twitter: @WBDigitalDist

Leave a Reply

Quote Unquotesee all »

MB Cool. I was really interested in the aerial photography from Enter the Void and how one could understand that conceptually as a POV, while in fact it’s more of an objective view of the city where the story takes place. So it’s an objective and subjective camera at the same time. I know that you’re interested in Kubrick. We’ve talked about that in the past because it’s something that you and I have in common—

GN You’re obsessed with Kubrick, too.

MB Does he still occupy your mind or was he more of an early influence?

GN He was more of an early influence. Kubrick has been my idol my whole life, my own “god.” I was six or seven years old when I saw 2001: A Space Odyssey, and I never felt such cinematic ecstasy. Maybe that’s what brought me to direct movies, to try to compete with that “wizard of Oz” behind the film. So then, years later, I tried to do something in that direction, like many other directors tried to do their own, you know, homage or remake or parody or whatever of 2001. I don’t know if you ever had that movie in mind for your own projects. But in my case, I don’t think about 2001 anymore now. That film was my first “trip” ever. And then I tried my best to reproduce on screen what some drug trips are like. But it’s very hard. For sure, moving images are a better medium than words, but it’s still very far from the real experience. I read that Kubrick said about Lynch’s Eraserhead, that he wished he had made that movie because it was the film he had seen that came closest to the language of nightmares.

Matthew Barney and Gaspar Noé

A Haunted House 2 is not a movie. It is a nervous breakdown. Directed by Michael Tiddes but largely the handiwork of star, producer, and co-writer Marlon Wayans, the film is being billed as yet another Wayans-ized spoof of the horror movie genre, à la the first Haunted House movie and the wildly successful Scary Movie series. (Keenen Ivory Wayans and his brothers were responsible for the first two Scary Movie films; they have since left that franchise, which may explain why a new one was needed.) And there are some familiar digs at recent horror flicks: This time, the creepy doll and the closet from The Conjuring, the family-murdering demon from Sinister, and the dybbuk box from The Possession all make appearances. But this new film is mostly an excuse for star Marlon Wayans to have extended freak-outs in response to the horrors visited upon him—shrieking, screaming, crying, cowering, and occasionally hate-fucking for minutes on end. Yes, you read that last bit right. A Haunted House 2 puts the satyriasis back in satire.”
Ebiri On A Haunted House 2