By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

WARNER BROS. DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION LAUNCHES “INSIDE THE SCRIPT” DIGITAL PUBLISHING INITIATIVE

MOVIE FANS CAN NOW OWN DIGITAL VERSIONS OF SCRIPTS FROM ICONIC FILMS INCLUDING “CASABLANCA,” “BEN-HUR,” “AN AMERICAN IN PARIS” AND “NORTH BY NORTHWEST” COMPLETE WITH RARE NOTES, PUBLICITY STILLS AND OTHER INTERACTIVE ASSETS

FIRST “INSIDE THE SCRIPT” TITLES NOW AVAILABLE ON iBOOKSTORE, KINDLE AND NOOK®
BURBANK, CALIF., April 30, 2012 – Warner Bros. Digital Distribution (WBDD) today announced the launch of “Inside the Script” – a digital publishing initiative that gives movie fans an innovative new way to go deep inside their favorite films.  Available now for iBookstore, Kindle and NOOK by Barnes & Noble, “Inside the Script” is a series of highly illustrated eBooks that contain the film’s actual shooting script, rare materials from the Warner Bros. Corporate Archive and much more.  The first series of “Inside the Script” titles are based on timeless, cinematic treasures including “Casablanca,” “Ben-Hur,” “An American in Paris” and “North by Northwest.”

“Inside the Script” offers movie fans an all-access pass to go behind-the-scenes of the films they know and love.  Every “Inside the Script” title includes the film’s complete shooting script in a customizable eBook format; dozens of chapters about the script and the film that detail the movie’s development; rare historical documents such as production notes, storyboards and candid photos; and an interactive image gallery of costumes, on-set stills, movie posters, set designs and behind-the-scenes photos.
“People love movies because of the stories they tell,” said Thomas Gewecke, President of Warner Bros. Digital Distribution. “Now we can give fans rarely seen details of how these stories came together and take their enjoyment of films to a whole new level.”
Highlighted elements from “Inside the Script” titles include:


“Casablanca”

– Jack Warner’s telegrams and memos
– Producer Hal Wallis’ script and production notes
– Production Code Administration letters, notes and seal of approval
– Telegram from producer Hal Wallis refuting his fight with Jack Warner

“Ben-Hur”
– Rare behind-the-scenes materials including makeup and wardrobe tests, production design sketches, sample matte paintings
– A forward and captions written by Charlton Heston’s son, Fraser C. Heston
– Excerpts from Charlton Heston’s acting and shooting journals during filming
– Details about the development of Panavision and MGM’s proprietary widescreen process (MGM Camera 65)


“An American in Paris”
– Full shooting script
– Detailed descriptions from continuity script’s musical numbers
– Treatment for the ballet sequence from Vincente Minnelli’s papers
– Set design paintings from the MGM production design collection
– Tickets to the film’s Hollywood premiere from MGM makeup artist John Truwe


“North by Northwest”
– Director Alfred Hitchcock’s editing and main title sequence notes
– Composer Bernard Herrmann’s music notes
– Photos and documents from Alfred Hitchcock’s papers:
– story department photos
– storyboards and photos of crop duster sequence
– production schedules and daily scene reports
– hair and makeup tests
– costume sketches
“Inside the Script” releases are now available for iBookstore, Kindle and NOOK for $9.99 per title.  For more information visit www.facebook.com/insidethescript.



About Warner Bros. Digital Distribution
Warner Bros. Digital Distribution (WBDD) oversees the electronic distribution of Warner Bros. Home Entertainment Group’s content through Video-On-Demand, Pay-Per-View, Electronic Sell-Through and Subscription Video-On-Demand via cable, satellite, online and mobile channels.   WBDD also distributes content through third party digital retailers and licensees.  A worldwide industry leader since its inception, WBDD also manages the Studio’s E-commerce sites that include WBShop.com and WarnerArchive.com.  Twitter: @WBDigitalDist

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